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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2012
If there is one television sportscaster to whom the adjective “legendary” can honestly be applied, it is Al Michaels, play-by-play announcer of NBC's “Sunday Night Football.” From almost two decades in the booth at ABC's “Monday night Football,” to his “Do you believe in miracles?” call of the U.S. victory over the Russian hockey team at 1980 Olympics, Michaels' resume and the history of the biggest moments of TV sports are practically one and the same. Michaels and his colleagues on NBC Sunday Night Football will be in Baltimore when the Ravens meet the New England Patriots.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2013
It was true last year, and it was true again Thanksgiving night: No one does the NFL like “NBC Sunday Night Football.” From the opening aerial shots making even old Baltimore look all glittery and glam, to Bob Costas welcoming tens of millions of viewers to M&T Bank Stadium, NBC made the Ravens-Pittsburgh Steelers game seem like the only place in the world to be Thursday night. After weeks of CBS Sports, what a pleasure it was to be in the skilled veteran hands of coordinating producer Fred Gaudelli, director Drew Esocoff, play-by-play announcer Al Michaels and analyst Cris Collinsworth.
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SPORTS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 27, 2003
A matchup between All-Star centers Shaquille O'Neal and Yao Ming failed to boost the preliminary rating for ABC's first NBA telecasts of the season. The rating for the Walt Disney Co. network's Christmas Day doubleheader fell 9 percent from last year in the top 55 U.S. markets, according to Nielsen Media Research Inc. The Dallas Mavericks vs. Sacramento Kings and O'Neal's Los Angeles Lakers vs. Yao's Houston Rockets were watched by an average 4.1 percent of households in the top markets.
NEWS
February 15, 2013
Although I've lived all my life within 30 miles of Times Square, I've never been much of a Giants or Jets fan (when people ask my favorite team, I usually say the Buffalo Bills, because unlike the players for the Jets or Giants, the Bills' high salaries help hold down my New York state income taxes). Yet, as I watched the Super Bowl , I found myself rooting for Baltimore because: •So much of Baltimore is so much like the neighborhood where I grew up in Queens. The attached brick houses with metal awnings shading what our parents called picture windows.
NEWS
August 30, 1996
Raiders at RavensTime: 1 p.m. Sunday, Ch. 11Announcers: Tom Hammond and Bob Trumpy.Why to watch: Baltimore returns to the NFL after 12 years, so let's vent one last time about Tagliabue, Cooke, et al, and get on with it.If it's a blowout: Watch till the end, anyway. It's history.Saints at 49ersTime: 4 p.m. Sunday, Ch. 45.Announcers: Kevin Harlan and Jerry Glanville.Why to watch: See Jerry Rice run, see Jerry Rice catch, see Jerry Rice score. And see Jim Mora frown, again.If it's a blowout: Unhook the cable and try to tune in the Patriots against the Dolphins on Washington's Channel 4.Bills at GiantsTime: 8 p.m. Sunday, TNTAnnouncers: Verne Lundquist and Pat Haden.
SPORTS
November 26, 2009
Monday night chemistry Joseph Schwerdt Sun Sentinel All the greats were and are minimalists. Ray Scott may be the best ever. Pat Summerall was calm and cool next to blustery John Madden. Dick Enberg, two words: "Oh, my!" Verne Lundquist is the best in the business today. Smooth and smart, he doesn't get in the way of the game. But the best team on an NFL game? It's the ESPN "Monday Night Football" crew. Three in the booth and two sideline reporters? Way too much chatter.
SPORTS
By Los Angeles Times | January 8, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- John Madden may eventually end up in ABC's "Monday Night Football" booth, replacing Dan Dierdorf, but he said yesterday that reports that a deal has already been completed were not accurate."
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER and RAY FRAGER,SUN REPORTER | February 9, 2006
Al Michaels won't be sticking around Monday nights this fall. ESPN let the veteran play-by-play announcer out of his contract to continue as the voice of Monday Night Football when it moves from ABC next season and yesterday announced a new three-man team for the booth - Mike Tirico on play-by-play, joined by ex-quarterback Joe Theismann and Washington Post columnist Tony Kornheiser. "Al let us know he was not comfortable with our vision in what we were doing," John Skipper, ESPN executive vice president for content, said in a teleconference yesterday.
NEWS
February 15, 2013
Although I've lived all my life within 30 miles of Times Square, I've never been much of a Giants or Jets fan (when people ask my favorite team, I usually say the Buffalo Bills, because unlike the players for the Jets or Giants, the Bills' high salaries help hold down my New York state income taxes). Yet, as I watched the Super Bowl , I found myself rooting for Baltimore because: •So much of Baltimore is so much like the neighborhood where I grew up in Queens. The attached brick houses with metal awnings shading what our parents called picture windows.
NEWS
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
Baltimore's Jim McKay anchored the first American telecast of the Summer Olympics in 1960 from a primitive CBS studio in Grand Central Terminal in New York City. Coverage of the Rome Games totaled 20 hours and cost the network $394,000 in rights fees. On Friday night, starting with the Opening Ceremonies, NBC Universal will launch what will ultimately total 5,535 hours of Olympics coverage across six network and cable outlets and one live streaming website over 17 days and nights.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2012
If there is one television sportscaster to whom the adjective “legendary” can honestly be applied, it is Al Michaels, play-by-play announcer of NBC's “Sunday Night Football.” From almost two decades in the booth at ABC's “Monday night Football,” to his “Do you believe in miracles?” call of the U.S. victory over the Russian hockey team at 1980 Olympics, Michaels' resume and the history of the biggest moments of TV sports are practically one and the same. Michaels and his colleagues on NBC Sunday Night Football will be in Baltimore when the Ravens meet the New England Patriots.
NEWS
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
Baltimore's Jim McKay anchored the first American telecast of the Summer Olympics in 1960 from a primitive CBS studio in Grand Central Terminal in New York City. Coverage of the Rome Games totaled 20 hours and cost the network $394,000 in rights fees. On Friday night, starting with the Opening Ceremonies, NBC Universal will launch what will ultimately total 5,535 hours of Olympics coverage across six network and cable outlets and one live streaming website over 17 days and nights.
SPORTS
By Sports on TV | December 5, 2010
After 25 years in the booth with two of the NFL's most storied and successful media franchises, NBC sportscaster Al Michaels has become the voice of prime-time TV football. But his voice extends even further throughout American culture and shared memory as a result of his work at the microphone during such landmark events as the U.S. victory in men's hockey at the Winter Olympics in 1980 and his coverage of an earthquake in San Francisco during the 1989 World Series. Michaels came to NBC's "Sunday Night Football" five years ago after 20 years with ABC's legendary "Monday Night Football.
SPORTS
December 20, 2009
Michaels says ... Brett Favre and Adrian Peterson could each have big nights. The Vikings are looking to wrap up a first-round bye, and that should be motivation enough to keep them interested against an overmatched opponent. The Panthers do have a running game, and they've got one of the better backs in the league in DeAngelo Williams, but he'll have to have a very big game for the Panthers to have a shot. And against Minnesota's vaunted run defense? Good luck. Collinsworth says ... For Brett Favre, he has a chance to go out in a dream scenario.
SPORTS
November 26, 2009
Monday night chemistry Joseph Schwerdt Sun Sentinel All the greats were and are minimalists. Ray Scott may be the best ever. Pat Summerall was calm and cool next to blustery John Madden. Dick Enberg, two words: "Oh, my!" Verne Lundquist is the best in the business today. Smooth and smart, he doesn't get in the way of the game. But the best team on an NFL game? It's the ESPN "Monday Night Football" crew. Three in the booth and two sideline reporters? Way too much chatter.
SPORTS
November 22, 2009
Al says … "The Eagles are what the NFL has become: very unpredictable. They were playing pretty well, then inexplicably lost to Oakland - how did that happen? - come back and kill the Giants, close game against Dallas but can't deliver, fall way behind in San Diego and rally but lose again. The one thing about the Eagles that people should know by now - the last few years this has happened - is they'll look like they're dead, and all of a sudden they play extremely well down the stretch."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,Special to the Sun | July 30, 2000
She's successful, beautiful, and -- get this, guys -- she knows more about football than you do. Now for the bad news: She's also engaged. But you can still see Melissa Stark every week on ABC's "Monday Night Football." The Baltimore native will be reporting from the sidelines during games as part of an almost completely new broadcasting lineup -- including comedian Dennis Miller -- put together for the show's 31st season. She and the rest of team, which ABC hopes will help revive "Monday Night Football's" flagging ratings, make their debut tomorrow night in a pre-season game between the New England Patriots and the San Francisco 49ers.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | April 26, 1991
In the beginning, there was the Encyclopaedia Britannica. And Jim McKay had it with him wherever he went, from Bridgeport to "A Bridge Too Far.""It was a savior during those early days of 'Wide World of Sports;' you'd be amazed what good, concise articles it has on just about every game known to man," said McKay, on the occasion of the show's 30th anniversary special on ABC Sunday (4:30 p.m.)What an adventure it has been the last three decades, not only for the veteran anchor of the program, but for viewers who grew up enjoying the full spectrum of sports, often presented in travelogue fashion.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER and RAY FRAGER,SUN REPORTER | February 9, 2006
Al Michaels won't be sticking around Monday nights this fall. ESPN let the veteran play-by-play announcer out of his contract to continue as the voice of Monday Night Football when it moves from ABC next season and yesterday announced a new three-man team for the booth - Mike Tirico on play-by-play, joined by ex-quarterback Joe Theismann and Washington Post columnist Tony Kornheiser. "Al let us know he was not comfortable with our vision in what we were doing," John Skipper, ESPN executive vice president for content, said in a teleconference yesterday.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | July 29, 2005
THE BEST PART of Tuesday's announcement by ESPN of its Monday Night Football announcing team - Al Michaels, Joe Theismann, Suzy Kolber and Michele Tafoya - came when network executive Mark Shapiro was asked about finding enough air time for sideline reporters Kolber and Tafoya. "It only works if we can keep Joe's comments to a minimum," Shapiro said during a conference call. The shame of it is, he was joking. As anyone who has watched ESPN's Sunday night NFL games knows, Theismann certainly enjoys the sound of his own voice.
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