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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 26, 2011
Ann P. "Nip" Melocik, a retired parochial school physical education instructor, died Wednesday of heart failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Loch Raven Village resident was 80. The daughter of a restaurateur and a homemaker, the former Ann Palmisano was born in Shamokin, Pa. She moved to Hamilton with her family in 1940 when her father opened several Palmisano's Sub Shops in the area. "She got her nickname 'Nip' from taking a little sip of her father's drink, so he named her 'Nipper,' and then everyone began calling her 'Nip,'" said a niece, Wendy Strassner of Atlanta.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2011
Ann P. "Nip" Melocik, a retired parochial school physical education instructor, died Wednesday of heart failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Loch Raven Village resident was 80. The daughter of a restaurateur and a homemaker, the former Ann Palmisano was born in Shamokin, Pa. She moved to Hamilton with her family in 1940 when her father opened several Palmisano's Sub Shops in the area. "She got her nickname 'Nip' from taking a little sip of her father's drink, so he named her 'Nipper,' and then everyone began calling her 'Nip,'" said a niece, Wendy Strassner of Atlanta.
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NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | October 14, 2007
Wait a minute. Wait a minute. You ain't heard nothin' yet." Before it was a cliche, it was a prophecy: Eighty years ago this month, audiences watched - and listened - as a character in a major motion picture spoke to them for the first time. The actor was Al Jolson, and the movie was The Jazz Singer. The effect was revolutionary. Within two years, talking pictures were everywhere, no one was releasing silent films, and three decades of silent-filmmaking was obsolete - tossed on the scrap heap.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | October 14, 2007
Wait a minute. Wait a minute. You ain't heard nothin' yet." Before it was a cliche, it was a prophecy: Eighty years ago this month, audiences watched - and listened - as a character in a major motion picture spoke to them for the first time. The actor was Al Jolson, and the movie was The Jazz Singer. The effect was revolutionary. Within two years, talking pictures were everywhere, no one was releasing silent films, and three decades of silent-filmmaking was obsolete - tossed on the scrap heap.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | September 23, 1995
Bouncing Bobby Berger strolled into Luigi Petti's restaurant in Little Italy on Tuesday, giving me a wave as he approached my table. Dressed in a short-sleeve black shirt open at the collar and beige pants, he sat down and ordered coffee only.Bobby Berger, head of B.B.B. (Bouncing Bobby Berger) Productions and a former Baltimore City police officer, gained notoriety in the 1980s for performing an imitation of Al Jolson -- complete with blackface makeup. An NAACP protest forced the cancellation of his show at the Hilton Hotel in 1982.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1998
A New Yorker in Baltimore to tap dance in a musical profile of Al Jolson was mugged and shot late Friday on a downtown street outside his hotel after one of his performances.James Branford Pace was recovering at Johns Hopkins Hospital from a bullet wound to his neck. He was in serious condition. Police said he might be paralyzed."Everybody, including my staff, we're all down," said Robert M. Pomory, president of Lyric Theatre, where the show "Jolson: The Musical" ended its six-day run Sunday before heading to Florida yesterday.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 10, 1996
George Burns, the beloved cigar-puffing comedian whose career spanned vaudeville, radio, movies and television, died yesterday at his home in Beverly Hills, Calif.Mr. Burns, 100, was the foremost comic "straight man" of his time in a partnership with his late wife, the scatterbrained Gracie Allen. He began a new solo career in show business when he was nearly 80.When he was well into his 90s, Mr. Burns announced with his customary brio that he had arranged to celebrate his 100th birthday, on Jan. 20, 1996, with an engagement at the London Palladium.
NEWS
January 25, 2004
On January 21, 2004, JOHN THORNTON BERGER, devoted father of Sandie Castle, Leslie and Rodney Berger and the late John Thornton Berger, Jr., Edward Matthew and Victoria Lynn Berger, dear brother of Albert J. and Thomas E. Berger, Bobby "Al Jolson" Berger, Jane Ann Laird, Patricia A. Sansone, Collette Schmidt and Loretta Paone; loving grandfather of Shawn C. H. Baron, Edward Berger, Josh and Sean Snyder and Rodney M. Berger, II and Jennifer Berger....
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 15, 1996
Bouncing Bobby Berger greeted me with a hug at the doors of the dinner theater of the Best Western Motel in Baltimore Travel Plaza."Greg, I didn't think you'd make it," Bobby said, obviously happy to see me. He didn't know the half of it. I'd promised him last month that I would attend his retirement performance Mother's Day. That was before I was sent on an assignment abroad. I returned to Baltimore only the previous Monday.So here I was, about to watch Bobby perform his blackface Al Jolson routine for the last time.
BUSINESS
By Ed Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2010
A landmark apartment building on Baltimore's West Side, the 36-unit Congress Hotel, is going on the auction block. The foreclosure auction will be at 2:30 p.m. on Sept. 28 at the Clarence M. Mitchell Court House, according to the website for Alex Cooper Auctioneers, which is handling the sale. The eight-story building, constructed in 1903 and once known as the Kernan Hotel, was renovated to contain 12 one-bedroom and 24 two-bedroom apartments nearly 10 years ago by Kernan Apartments LLC, an affiliate of Struever Bros.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1998
A New Yorker in Baltimore to tap dance in a musical profile of Al Jolson was mugged and shot late Friday on a downtown street outside his hotel after one of his performances.James Branford Pace was recovering at Johns Hopkins Hospital from a bullet wound to his neck. He was in serious condition. Police said he might be paralyzed."Everybody, including my staff, we're all down," said Robert M. Pomory, president of Lyric Theatre, where the show "Jolson: The Musical" ended its six-day run Sunday before heading to Florida yesterday.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | September 23, 1995
Bouncing Bobby Berger strolled into Luigi Petti's restaurant in Little Italy on Tuesday, giving me a wave as he approached my table. Dressed in a short-sleeve black shirt open at the collar and beige pants, he sat down and ordered coffee only.Bobby Berger, head of B.B.B. (Bouncing Bobby Berger) Productions and a former Baltimore City police officer, gained notoriety in the 1980s for performing an imitation of Al Jolson -- complete with blackface makeup. An NAACP protest forced the cancellation of his show at the Hilton Hotel in 1982.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | November 3, 2007
When the name of singer Ronnie Dove is mentioned, the phase "Baltimore's own" usually precedes it. Although born in Herndon, Va., Dove has been part of Baltimore's popular music scene since the mid-1950s. Retirement is not in his vocabulary. He'll be singing tonight in Queenstown at the Bay Country Moose Lodge. In February, he's leading a Caribbean cruise. "I sang all through high school," he said the other day from his home in Pasadena. He credited his grandmother as his musical inspiration.
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