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By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | July 28, 2003
I could hear Al Green, but I couldn't see him because the crowd was too thick. The gospel-soul legend performed Friday night - the biggest act of this year's Artscape, the city's celebration of music, dance, theater, visual arts and literature. During the next two days, I and the other music lovers who thronged to the festival reveled in sounds ranging from Afro-Cuban jazz to the digital beats of electronica. Green's unmistakable sound hung in the air like the smell of ham hocks and collard greens, whetting my appetite for something I knew would fill me up. Finally, after stepping on a few toes and pushing past some folks, I was able to see the man. Telling us that "everythang's gon be alright/He's comin' back/like He said He would," Rev. Al, decked out in a three-piece ivory suit, was in country-preacher mode but only for a moment.
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By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | May 11, 2008
By the time Al Green was 25 years old in 1972, he had become one of the biggest stars in pop and soul. After about five years of developing his unique style, scoring a few R&B hits along the way, the Arkansas native landed a No. 1 pop smash that year with "Let's Stay Together." A long stream of hits flowed over the next four years: "I'm Still in Love With You," "You Ought to Be With Me," "Call Me (Come Back Home)," "Here I Am (Come and Take Me)." The seven albums Green released during that period, including a greatest hits collection, are all regarded as classics.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Randy Lewis and Randy Lewis,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 9, 2005
It doesn't take much to get Al Green - the Rev. Al Green, that is - up on his pulpit. Especially when the subject is love. The most acclaimed soul singer since Ray Charles has seen love, experienced it and sung about it from many perspectives: as an R&B sex symbol in the 1970s, as a reborn gospel singer and preacher in the '80s and '90s, and lately as a man who has struck a balance between the secular and the spiritual. When Green decided last year to reunite with his longtime songwriting partner and producer Willie Mitchell - with whom he created some of the most enticing, sensual soul records ever in Let's Stay Together, Tired of Being Alone and You Ought to Be With Me - his first stop was his mother's house.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN REPORTER | August 8, 2007
The Paetec Jazz Festival, coming to Baltimore this week, has its bases covered. Blues? B.B. King. Rock? Little Richard. Soul? Al Green. Funk? Earth, Wind & Fire. But jazz? Not so much. "It's a music festival," said Andy Bienstock, host of a nightly jazz show on WYPR-FM. He said he wouldn't describe it as a jazz festival since the majority of the 40 acts fall into some other category. But Bienstock knows the reality of the market: Jazz doesn't sell. "What's interesting is that jazz as a marketing term seems to mean more than jazz itself," he said.
NEWS
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | May 11, 2008
By the time Al Green was 25 years old in 1972, he had become one of the biggest stars in pop and soul. After about five years of developing his unique style, scoring a few R&B hits along the way, the Arkansas native landed a No. 1 pop smash that year with "Let's Stay Together." A long stream of hits flowed over the next four years: "I'm Still in Love With You," "You Ought to Be With Me," "Call Me (Come Back Home)," "Here I Am (Come and Take Me)." The seven albums Green released during that period, including a greatest hits collection, are all regarded as classics.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | July 25, 2007
One legend replaces another for the final, Saturday night concert of the Paetec Jazz Festival on Aug. 11 at Pier Six Concert Pavilion. Because of illness, Etta James will be replaced on the bill by rock pioneer Little Richard. He'll join Al Green and B.B. King on the lineup. "On behalf of everyone at the Paetec Jazz Festival, we send Ms. James our best wishes for a speedy recovery," said Marc Iacona, co-producer of the festival. "We are very pleased, however, that Little Richard ... will join American music legends B.B. King and Al Green in what we know will be an incredible concert of memorable music.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | October 10, 1993
At one point early on in the novel "Swann's Way," Proust's narrator describes how the taste of a madeleine -- a small, sweet cake -- soaked in tea so suffused him with pleasure that all the petty annoyances of everyday life seemed to melt away before him. It was as if he'd been whisked away to the Sunday mornings of his youth, sipping lime tea in his aunt's house inCombray.But only for a moment; by his third mouthful, the potion began to lose its power. Soon, the magical madeleine was just a sweet cake to be eaten with tea, and Proust's narrator was once again mired in the present.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | January 13, 1995
New York -- Awards shows are usually stuffy, star-studded events at which everything said sounds as if it came straight off the TelePrompTer. They're predictable, monotonous and stupifyingly dull.Fortunately, the 10th Annual Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Induction Dinner is nothing like an awards show.Sure, speeches are made and statues change hands, but where that's usually the end of awards shows, that's only the beginning for the Hall of Fame. For one thing, most of the inductees and many of the inductors come ready to play -- meaning that this year's crowd got to hear first-rate performances by everyone from the Allman Brothers Band to Al Green (on his own and with Willie Nelson)
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN REPORTER | August 8, 2007
The Paetec Jazz Festival, coming to Baltimore this week, has its bases covered. Blues? B.B. King. Rock? Little Richard. Soul? Al Green. Funk? Earth, Wind & Fire. But jazz? Not so much. "It's a music festival," said Andy Bienstock, host of a nightly jazz show on WYPR-FM. He said he wouldn't describe it as a jazz festival since the majority of the 40 acts fall into some other category. But Bienstock knows the reality of the market: Jazz doesn't sell. "What's interesting is that jazz as a marketing term seems to mean more than jazz itself," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | May 10, 2007
Just as I do with my clothes when the seasons change, I pull out or buy music appropriate for the shift in temperature. More sun for me means more uptempo grooves at the crib and in my ride. My playlist in the past week or so has been dominated by classic disco (the 12-inch mixes of Donna Summer's "Spring Affair" and "I Feel Love"), feel-good funk (Mass Production's "Welcome to Our World of Merry Music" and Bernard Wright's "Haboglabotribin'") and sun-drenched soul (Stevie Wonder's "As" and Minnie Riperton's "Reasons")
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | July 25, 2007
One legend replaces another for the final, Saturday night concert of the Paetec Jazz Festival on Aug. 11 at Pier Six Concert Pavilion. Because of illness, Etta James will be replaced on the bill by rock pioneer Little Richard. He'll join Al Green and B.B. King on the lineup. "On behalf of everyone at the Paetec Jazz Festival, we send Ms. James our best wishes for a speedy recovery," said Marc Iacona, co-producer of the festival. "We are very pleased, however, that Little Richard ... will join American music legends B.B. King and Al Green in what we know will be an incredible concert of memorable music.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | June 21, 2007
He hopes you feel him. As R&B newcomer Keite Young discusses his debut, The Rise & Fall of Keite Young, he stresses the idea of the record being an intense, soul-baring conversation with the listener. "My vision for this record revolved around relating to people," says the singer-songwriter, who plays Eden's Lounge tonight. "Some scenarios are personal, some I imagined. I wanted to give a sense of kinship." In doing that, Young (whose first name is pronounced "keet") leans on familiar elements of Prince, Sly Stone and Al Green as he croons kaleidoscopic songs of redemptive and romantic love.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | May 10, 2007
Just as I do with my clothes when the seasons change, I pull out or buy music appropriate for the shift in temperature. More sun for me means more uptempo grooves at the crib and in my ride. My playlist in the past week or so has been dominated by classic disco (the 12-inch mixes of Donna Summer's "Spring Affair" and "I Feel Love"), feel-good funk (Mass Production's "Welcome to Our World of Merry Music" and Bernard Wright's "Haboglabotribin'") and sun-drenched soul (Stevie Wonder's "As" and Minnie Riperton's "Reasons")
ENTERTAINMENT
By Randy Lewis and Randy Lewis,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 9, 2005
It doesn't take much to get Al Green - the Rev. Al Green, that is - up on his pulpit. Especially when the subject is love. The most acclaimed soul singer since Ray Charles has seen love, experienced it and sung about it from many perspectives: as an R&B sex symbol in the 1970s, as a reborn gospel singer and preacher in the '80s and '90s, and lately as a man who has struck a balance between the secular and the spiritual. When Green decided last year to reunite with his longtime songwriting partner and producer Willie Mitchell - with whom he created some of the most enticing, sensual soul records ever in Let's Stay Together, Tired of Being Alone and You Ought to Be With Me - his first stop was his mother's house.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | July 28, 2003
I could hear Al Green, but I couldn't see him because the crowd was too thick. The gospel-soul legend performed Friday night - the biggest act of this year's Artscape, the city's celebration of music, dance, theater, visual arts and literature. During the next two days, I and the other music lovers who thronged to the festival reveled in sounds ranging from Afro-Cuban jazz to the digital beats of electronica. Green's unmistakable sound hung in the air like the smell of ham hocks and collard greens, whetting my appetite for something I knew would fill me up. Finally, after stepping on a few toes and pushing past some folks, I was able to see the man. Telling us that "everythang's gon be alright/He's comin' back/like He said He would," Rev. Al, decked out in a three-piece ivory suit, was in country-preacher mode but only for a moment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | June 8, 2000
AROUND THE HARBOR Volleyball Marathon Take part or cheer on teams in the 24th annual Volleyball Marathon and third annual Volleyball Tournament this weekend at Rash Field. Players spike up for the National Kidney Foundation of Maryland from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday. There also will be information booths on health-related subjects and children's activities, including face-painting. Admission is free for spectators both days. Registration for players is free Saturday and $35 Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | June 21, 2007
He hopes you feel him. As R&B newcomer Keite Young discusses his debut, The Rise & Fall of Keite Young, he stresses the idea of the record being an intense, soul-baring conversation with the listener. "My vision for this record revolved around relating to people," says the singer-songwriter, who plays Eden's Lounge tonight. "Some scenarios are personal, some I imagined. I wanted to give a sense of kinship." In doing that, Young (whose first name is pronounced "keet") leans on familiar elements of Prince, Sly Stone and Al Green as he croons kaleidoscopic songs of redemptive and romantic love.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | November 16, 1995
Alice in ChainsAlice in Chains (Columbia 677243)In some ways, the most impressive thing about "Alice in Chains" isn't that it boasts some of the crunchiest guitar and heaviest riffs Alice in Chains has ever used but that it does so without really sounding like a metal album. It helps, of course, that Layne Staley totally avoids the standard metal mannerisms -- the stentorian shriek, the mock-operatic histrionics -- preferring instead to multi-track his tart, alterna-rock baritone into harmonies so complex it's like hearing the Beach Boys at half speed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | November 16, 1995
Alice in ChainsAlice in Chains (Columbia 677243)In some ways, the most impressive thing about "Alice in Chains" isn't that it boasts some of the crunchiest guitar and heaviest riffs Alice in Chains has ever used but that it does so without really sounding like a metal album. It helps, of course, that Layne Staley totally avoids the standard metal mannerisms -- the stentorian shriek, the mock-operatic histrionics -- preferring instead to multi-track his tart, alterna-rock baritone into harmonies so complex it's like hearing the Beach Boys at half speed.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | January 13, 1995
New York -- Awards shows are usually stuffy, star-studded events at which everything said sounds as if it came straight off the TelePrompTer. They're predictable, monotonous and stupifyingly dull.Fortunately, the 10th Annual Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Induction Dinner is nothing like an awards show.Sure, speeches are made and statues change hands, but where that's usually the end of awards shows, that's only the beginning for the Hall of Fame. For one thing, most of the inductees and many of the inductors come ready to play -- meaning that this year's crowd got to hear first-rate performances by everyone from the Allman Brothers Band to Al Green (on his own and with Willie Nelson)
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