Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAl D Amato
IN THE NEWS

Al D Amato

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By MARIE COCCO | August 9, 1995
As a child enchanted by the spell of his gregarious grandfather, little Al D'Amato would fetch fresh drinks and empty ashtrays for the men at the Sunday card games that went on in the basement of his grandparents' Brooklyn home, while the women cooked upstairs.''I learned the ways of men and cards -- a life of bluffing, folding, smoking, bragging and losing a game without losing your composure,'' the New York senator writes in his new autobiography. ''If I stood by a winning hand, I might get a dime or a nickel or a pat on the head.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | November 2, 1998
WASHINGTON -- New Yorkers like to imagine that they are living in the capital of culture and sophistication. Then there is Sen. Al D'Amato.The question of the moment is whether the Republican senator might have gone just a tad too far in calling his Democratic challenger, Rep. Charles Schumer, a "putzhead." There is some disagreement over precisely what the term means, but no one believes it is a compliment, whether in Yiddish or English. Mr. D'Amato himself confirmed that view by first denying he ever said it, then yielding to the inevitable proof.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of the Sun | July 16, 1995
There was Sen. Alfonse M. D'Amato last January, riding high on the GOP jet stream to power and position. He was now chairman of the Senate Banking Committee, chairman of the Republican senators' fund-raising committee.He was now one of the most influential men in the Senate.There would be no more singing "Old MacDonald had some pork" on the Senate floor. No more loud and showy productions with a giant "Taxasaurus" prop. No more Mad Dog D'Amato.He would be a statesman now. A gentleman senator.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 25, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Seymour Rubin, an enduring lawyer who arrived in Washington as a Roosevelt-era Wunderkind, gently sipped his martini, deciding how to defend his reputation in a controversy rooted 50 years deep in history."
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | March 21, 1994
Before Walt Disney Co. and the working man's friend Peter Angelos are through, watching a game in spring training is going to cost even more than in Oriole Park.It has just dawned on people that before the Clintons were running the country from the noblest of motives, they were making out in Arkansas politics. We are shocked, shocked.The Republicans finally produced a moralist: Al D'Amato.It turns out some old film cartoons were really animated. Long before gangsta rap.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | July 19, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Having Al D'Amato probe your ethics is like having a blindfolded fortune teller read your palm: How much can you really trust the result?It is not known, for instance, whether Senator D'Amato, Republican from New York, would actually recognize an ethical lapse if he came across one.He certainly has never found one in his own oft-questioned behavior.But as chairman of something called the Senate Special Committee on Whitewater, D'Amato is now in charge of finding out, as he once put it, "What did the president know and when did Hillary tell him?"
NEWS
By William Safire | November 2, 1994
REPUBLICAN PARTY loyalty has just been dramatically tested from coast to coast.In New York's grudge fight, a Republican mayor jumped ship to save a sinking Democratic governor; that was flat-out party disloyalty. Contrariwise, in California, a GOP presidential hopeful disagreed with a Republican governor on principle: that was in the zestiest tradition of fighting for a party's soul.New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani, a '70s Democrat who turned Republican in the '80s, made another turn in the '90s to support the last true-believer Democrat, Gov. Mario Cuomo, who is losing.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | April 7, 1995
Al D'Amato is a jerk.(If I've offended anybody by that statement, I apologize.)Al D'Amato is a clown. He's a goof. He was voted the senator most likely to make a fool of himself.(If I've said anything that could in any way be considered offensive, I'm deeply sorry.)Usually, he's harmless. Usually, Big Al spends his time calling press conferences on the Capitol steps to announce that he's in love, like he and his main squeeze -- millionaire gossip columnist Claudia Cohen -- are another John and Yoko.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Staff Writer | February 23, 1995
Let me preface this by saying that I am no looker myself and that, when viewed in a certain light and at just the right angle, have been known to resemble a younger Charles Durning.But even a schlub like me can see that there is a preponderance in the celebrity world of great-looking women with men who are, um, not so great-looking.The latest example of this involves New York Sen. Al D'Amato, 57, and Claudia Cohen, 44, who is now being referred to as "millionaire TV gossip reporter Claudia Cohen," much as you might refer to "hard-throwing right-hander Roger Clemens."
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | November 2, 1998
WASHINGTON -- New Yorkers like to imagine that they are living in the capital of culture and sophistication. Then there is Sen. Al D'Amato.The question of the moment is whether the Republican senator might have gone just a tad too far in calling his Democratic challenger, Rep. Charles Schumer, a "putzhead." There is some disagreement over precisely what the term means, but no one believes it is a compliment, whether in Yiddish or English. Mr. D'Amato himself confirmed that view by first denying he ever said it, then yielding to the inevitable proof.
NEWS
By George F. Will | May 13, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Recollecting in tranquility the delights of politics in 1800, a retired congressman said, ''It was a pleasure to live in those good old days, when a Federalist could knock a Republican down in the streets and not be questioned about it.''In 1996, Republicans knock Republicans down. Bob Dole, who talks about leadership, should show some by knocking enough heads together to restore order in his party's ranks.Newt Gingrich and Pat Buchanan have been called liabilities by Al D'Amato -- talk about being called ugly by a frog -- and some conservatives suspect that Govs.
NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | May 8, 1996
WASHINGTON -- As Republican leaders read the polls and steadily grow more panicky about the November outlook for presumptive presidential nominee Bob Dole, more and more demands are being heard for him to specify just what he would do as president to improve the lot of average Americans.Ordinarily, that isn't a problem for a nominee, because he usually marches in front of an ideological parade that either he has recruited or he has inherited. Ronald Reagan in 1980 and 1984 did the former; George Bush in 1988 and 1992 did the latter, and it produced victory three times out of four.
NEWS
By MARIE COCCO | August 9, 1995
As a child enchanted by the spell of his gregarious grandfather, little Al D'Amato would fetch fresh drinks and empty ashtrays for the men at the Sunday card games that went on in the basement of his grandparents' Brooklyn home, while the women cooked upstairs.''I learned the ways of men and cards -- a life of bluffing, folding, smoking, bragging and losing a game without losing your composure,'' the New York senator writes in his new autobiography. ''If I stood by a winning hand, I might get a dime or a nickel or a pat on the head.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | July 19, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Having Al D'Amato probe your ethics is like having a blindfolded fortune teller read your palm: How much can you really trust the result?It is not known, for instance, whether Senator D'Amato, Republican from New York, would actually recognize an ethical lapse if he came across one.He certainly has never found one in his own oft-questioned behavior.But as chairman of something called the Senate Special Committee on Whitewater, D'Amato is now in charge of finding out, as he once put it, "What did the president know and when did Hillary tell him?"
FEATURES
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of the Sun | July 16, 1995
There was Sen. Alfonse M. D'Amato last January, riding high on the GOP jet stream to power and position. He was now chairman of the Senate Banking Committee, chairman of the Republican senators' fund-raising committee.He was now one of the most influential men in the Senate.There would be no more singing "Old MacDonald had some pork" on the Senate floor. No more loud and showy productions with a giant "Taxasaurus" prop. No more Mad Dog D'Amato.He would be a statesman now. A gentleman senator.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | April 7, 1995
Al D'Amato is a jerk.(If I've offended anybody by that statement, I apologize.)Al D'Amato is a clown. He's a goof. He was voted the senator most likely to make a fool of himself.(If I've said anything that could in any way be considered offensive, I'm deeply sorry.)Usually, he's harmless. Usually, Big Al spends his time calling press conferences on the Capitol steps to announce that he's in love, like he and his main squeeze -- millionaire gossip columnist Claudia Cohen -- are another John and Yoko.
NEWS
August 3, 1994
Before the main event -- Roger Altman vs. Al D'Amato -- started yesterday in the Senate's Whitewater hearings, there was a revealing exchange between Sen. Paul Sarbanes and Josh Steiner, the bright young chief of staff for Secretary of the Treasury Lloyd Bentsen.Some of Mr. Steiner's diary entries strongly suggest Mr. Altman, when he was acting director of the Resolution Trust Corporation -- the agency that oversaw failed savings and loans -- was less than honest in his committee testimony about the Whitewater affair back in February.
NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | May 8, 1996
WASHINGTON -- As Republican leaders read the polls and steadily grow more panicky about the November outlook for presumptive presidential nominee Bob Dole, more and more demands are being heard for him to specify just what he would do as president to improve the lot of average Americans.Ordinarily, that isn't a problem for a nominee, because he usually marches in front of an ideological parade that either he has recruited or he has inherited. Ronald Reagan in 1980 and 1984 did the former; George Bush in 1988 and 1992 did the latter, and it produced victory three times out of four.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Staff Writer | February 23, 1995
Let me preface this by saying that I am no looker myself and that, when viewed in a certain light and at just the right angle, have been known to resemble a younger Charles Durning.But even a schlub like me can see that there is a preponderance in the celebrity world of great-looking women with men who are, um, not so great-looking.The latest example of this involves New York Sen. Al D'Amato, 57, and Claudia Cohen, 44, who is now being referred to as "millionaire TV gossip reporter Claudia Cohen," much as you might refer to "hard-throwing right-hander Roger Clemens."
NEWS
By William Safire | February 7, 1995
THE BEST line so far of the '96 presidential campaign was Sen. Bob Dole's, when asked why he was running: "Every country needs a president."Seemingly offhand and self-mocking; but on second thought, the remark tapped a growing feeling that this country is presidentially bereft. The Oval Office seems somehow vacant; the job is open.Mr. Dole was forced to make his pre-announcement because he had to show supporters his candidacy was certain. With Jack Kemp removing himself, Mr. Dole needed to move on Mr. Kemp's financial and ideological supporters: These are broad-spectrum Republicans, ever-more-quietly pro-life but unabashedly reaching out to minorities and optimists.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.