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NEWS
By Mary Pearce | September 26, 1990
Around Mt. Washington I am known as the bicycle lady who lives in Al Capone's house.I live in the red brick house on Pimlico Road where Alphonse "Scarface Al" Capone lived from November 1939 to March 1940. Indeed, I live in the same second floor apartment that Capone rented.According to a Jan. 8, 1940, Evening Sun story, "Capone moves into Mt. Washington home," Scarface Al came to Baltimore on Nov. 16, 1939, following his release from federal prison at Lewisburg, Pa. That same day he checked into Union Memorial Hospital.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | September 17, 2012
"Every day in every way I am getting better and better. " - Nelson Van Alden What's that, "Boardwalk Empire" without its tragic hero, Jimmy Darmody? What's next, an aviatrix (or "lady flyer" if you prefer) navigating across the continent? As the third season of "Boardwalk" soldiers on sans Jimmy, everyone else in Atlantic City and beyond seems to be aspiring to be a better "them" in 1923. Well, almost everyone (looking at you, Al Capone). For as long as Jimmy was around, he always reminded Nucky Thompson that he couldn't be "half a gangster.
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NEWS
By Lee Johnson | August 22, 1991
Jack Davidson, a nonagenarian who lives in Hagerstown, told this story to Lee Johnson, also of Hagerstown. Johnson is a retired salesman. WHEN YOU PASS 90, the things you used to take for granted become more and more important with each passing year. Such is the case with my occasional Sunday afternoon rides over territory that once was exquisitely familiar but now is barely recognizable. I'm talking about the routes and places I knew 60 years ago while I was delivering illegal whiskey for Al Capone.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2011
The gift that a notorious gangster made to Union Memorial Hospital 72 years ago is still giving. The weeping cherry, known to all in the hospital community as the Capone tree, is showing its age but remains resplendent and fertile with its glorious spring blossoms, abundant seedlings and rich wood. The tree donated by Al Capone lost a hefty limb in the 2010 snow storms. The toppled branch left a gaping hole halfway up the trunk and raised concerns for the longstanding landmark on East 33rd Street.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 13, 1993
MOSCOW -- Thugs had been demanding protection money from the businessman for some time. Then one recent day, his wife opened the door of their apartment and a bomb went off. She bled to death in front of their two small children.At Russia's fortress-like police headquarters, Officer Vladimir A. Petukhov, the harried and dour veteran lawman in charge of investigating contract killings, estimated that 100 to 150 businessmen have been murdered this year by extortionists, gangsters and free-lance hit men. As for the gangland-style bombing at the home of the manager of a Russian-Swiss venture, it raised no eyebrows.
FEATURES
By Don Aucoin and Don Aucoin,BOSTON GLOBE | June 3, 1999
It does the heart good somehow to see an inflated reputation reduced to a popped balloon by a few piercing words. In that spirit, American Heritage does solid service with its second annual list of the most overrated and underrated people, things, ideas, and events in U.S. history.You may find yourself lingering upon the "overrated" list, especially given the scathing treatment some of the subjects receive. Among those whose reputations are cut down to size: Gloria Steinem, Al Capone, Ernest Hemingway, Isaac Asimov, the 1960s, Shel Silverstein, John Adams, Boss Tweed, atomic power, Alfred Eisenstaedt, Hunter S. Thompson, Gary Cooper, the idea of progress, Alexis de Tocqueville, Yalta and the Beatles.
FEATURES
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1996
CHICAGO -- Frankie swaggers onto the black bus with bullet holes in the windows and snarls at the passengers. "All right, shut up!" Then he pulls out his gun and starts firing.Everybody ducks, before the momentary shock gives way to guffaws. Frankie, a k a Michael Moylan -- surrogate gangster, tour guide, historian, comedian -- smiles mischievously. "Hmm," he mutters, "you must all be from New York."With that, we're off to Prohibition-era Chicago on a most unconventional tour, led by Moylan and his partner in crime re-creation, "Shoulders," street name for Randy Craig.
NEWS
By Andrei Codrescu | November 13, 1995
ST. LOUIS -- Someone said to me, while I watched a big gambling boat suck and spew suckers in St. Louis, ''Did you know that birds shed their brains when they migrate?'' I didn't know that, but seeing the tourists being swallowed by the casino, I could believe it.My interlocutor was bird-like himself, a Chicago salesman who had been spending so much time on the road, he had begun studying migratory birds in an effort to understand himself.There is an unspoken solidarity among us travelers.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2000
Catoctin Colorfest in Thurmont Welcome fall at the 37th Annual Catoctin Colorfest Arts and Crafts Show, Saturday and Sunday in Thurmont. The event will feature the wares of more than 360 juried craftspeople. Browse the many stands displaying paintings, stained glass, pottery, baskets, tablecloths, leather and woodcrafts. Feast on your choice of crab cakes, soup, hot dogs, apple pie and barbecue chicken. Entertainment will be provided by the Hagerstown Country Western Dance Association and students of Linda L. Elower's Studio of Dance.
NEWS
By Maria Archangelo and Maria Archangelo,Staff writer | November 14, 1990
WESTMINSTER - Drug dealers in Carroll don't have much in common with Chicago's infamous gangster Al Capone, but County Attorney Chuck W.Thompson hopes a newly enacted ordinance changes some of that.The County Commissioners passed yesterday a law designed to hit drug dealers where it hurts -- in their wallets and pocketbooks. The ordinance levies a 50 percent sales tax on illegal drug transactions, and will penalize dealers who evade the tax."If you remember, they didn't get Al Capone for the other crimes he was accused of," said Thompson, who drafted the law for the county.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Laura Smitherman and Gadi Dechter and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporters | July 25, 2008
State Sen. Ulysses Currie, whose work for Shoppers Food Warehouse is being investigated by the FBI's public corruption squad, was paid more than $200,000 by the regional grocery chain over five years, according to documents unsealed yesterday. Federal authorities are looking at whether the Lanham-based supermarket company hired the leading Prince George's County Democrat to use the prestige of his office to secure favorable legislation and actions by state agencies, documents show. According to portions of a search warrant affidavit unsealed at the request of The Sun and other media organizations, Currie was paid about $207,000 between 2003 and 2007.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2001
A colorful chapter in the history of Northwest Baltimore - where Al Capone once had a hideout and revelers came to dance the night away - was closed this week with the news that Bonnie View Country Club will be moving to make way for more housing. The club, whose 167-acre golf course on Smith Avenue sprawls across the city-county line near Mount Washington, announced that it would move within two years to a new home near Reisterstown. The move, Bonnie View officials said, is contingent on the $15 million sale of the club to Stavrou Associates of Lanham, which plans to build a retirement community on the property.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2000
Catoctin Colorfest in Thurmont Welcome fall at the 37th Annual Catoctin Colorfest Arts and Crafts Show, Saturday and Sunday in Thurmont. The event will feature the wares of more than 360 juried craftspeople. Browse the many stands displaying paintings, stained glass, pottery, baskets, tablecloths, leather and woodcrafts. Feast on your choice of crab cakes, soup, hot dogs, apple pie and barbecue chicken. Entertainment will be provided by the Hagerstown Country Western Dance Association and students of Linda L. Elower's Studio of Dance.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1999
For more than 60 years, barber John V. Patti Jr. was known for his 15-minute haircuts and for wielding quite possibly the fastest pair of scissors in a North Howard Street tonsorial parlor.Mr. Patti, who was known as the "mayor of Howard Street," died Sept. 9 of congestive heart failure at Northwest Hospital Center near his home in Margate, Fla. He was 86.Mr. Patti, who also maintained a home in Milford Mill, bought his first shop on the west side of Howard Street near Baltimore Street in 1940.
TOPIC
By Herbert London | August 22, 1999
NEW YORK -- Geraldo Rivera has made a reputation for himself with grand events such as the opening of gangster Al Capone's vault.The vault turned out to be empty, as have so many of the claims from the TV talk show host. Yet, stories such as these, devoid of factual content, haven't stood in the way of Rivera's rise to television fame.He commands a salary well into seven figures. His television persona (on display on the CNBC talk show "Rivera Live!") is based on indignation -- over the way President Clinton has been treated, over the O.J. Simpson verdict, over political views he doesn't share.
FEATURES
By Don Aucoin and Don Aucoin,BOSTON GLOBE | June 3, 1999
It does the heart good somehow to see an inflated reputation reduced to a popped balloon by a few piercing words. In that spirit, American Heritage does solid service with its second annual list of the most overrated and underrated people, things, ideas, and events in U.S. history.You may find yourself lingering upon the "overrated" list, especially given the scathing treatment some of the subjects receive. Among those whose reputations are cut down to size: Gloria Steinem, Al Capone, Ernest Hemingway, Isaac Asimov, the 1960s, Shel Silverstein, John Adams, Boss Tweed, atomic power, Alfred Eisenstaedt, Hunter S. Thompson, Gary Cooper, the idea of progress, Alexis de Tocqueville, Yalta and the Beatles.
FEATURES
By Adon Taft and Adon Taft,Knight-Ridder | August 28, 1991
When you've jumped out of a plane at 9,600 feet to celebrate your 86th birthday by sky diving, what's left?Manya Joyce is taking classes in scuba diving and would love to drive the pace car for the Indianapolis 500."You've got to reach out for glorious experiences," says the Russian-born resident of Singer Island in Palm Beach County, Fla., who received worldwide attention -- press calls from Australia, Europe and Canada -- for her April aerial antics above Clewiston, Fla. She welcomes the publicity if it creates interest in her pet project, the Senior Olympics.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | May 19, 1994
There ought to be a bus marked George Mohr's Tours.It would depart from Winner Avenue, not too far from some of the oldest barns at Pimlico Race Course, ramble along Belvedere Avenue and crisscross Mount Washington.For the next hour, you'd learn about the people, the hidden landmarks, the bulldozed farms and the vanished streets of the racing village that once surrounded Old Hilltop.George Mohr at 78 is a legend in racing circles, a distinguished trainer of top thoroughbreds who has never left his old neighborhood.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | April 20, 1997
The story of Union Memorial's Al Capone tree has become part of Baltimore lore -- a tale often repeated at this time of year, when the old weeping cherry just east of the hospital's 33rd Street facade bursts into bloom.Legend has it that Capone gave the hospital the tree as a gift after being treated there for syphilis. No one has ever proven this to be true, although hospital employees have long sworn by the story.It is hard to think of this glorious botanical specimen as the legacy of one of gangland's most famous characters, the man remembered as the architect of the bloody St. Valentine's Day Massacre.
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