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By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | October 8, 1998
Akbar in Randallstown, one of three Akbars in the area, has been sold. The new owner is Chandra Nigam; he's renamed it the Akbar Palace. The restaurant was formerly known for its northern Indian cuisine; Nigam has expanded the menu to include specialties from various regions in India. Signature dishes include tandoori salmon, baby lamb chops and dosas (filled pancakes). Also new: live sitar music on the weekends. Akbar Palace is at 3541 Brenbrook Drive.Fondue restaurant to openThe opening of the area's first fondue restaurant, once set for July, is now scheduled for mid- to late-October.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2010
There's probably some Australopithecine lizard brain thing that triggers my sense of conspiratorial intimacy whenever I go below street level to dine or drink. That or something about strangers gathering in dimly lit subterranean chambers appeals to the suppressed romantic in me. Genetic or poetic, it hardly matters when once below ground I'm facing a flank of chafing dishes offering mouth-watering food from the Indian subcontinent. 12:27 p.m. We make our way down the steps and enter Akbar , 823 N. Charles St. Judging from the size of the crowd, my dining companion and I are far from the only Australopithecine romantics in Baltimore.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Lynn Williams and Lynn Williams,Sun Restaurant Critic | March 8, 1991
Akbar has taken to advertising itself with the line "Voted Best Indian Restaurant by The Baltimore Sun." When I first saw this, I was tempted to ask for a recount. Nobody had asked me, and frankly, my vote would have gone elsewhere.But hey, everybody loves a winner, and the time seemed ripe to find out whether or not Akbar had improved since my last visit. (Which was, I figured, just before Bombay Grill opened.)While I still wouldn't give it top honors, Akbar turned out to be much better than remembered.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | August 13, 2009
When it comes to hip-hop, Baltimore doesn't have too many nationally recognized artists. The major hip-hop record labels focus on cities like New York and Atlanta and spend little time or attention on Baltimore. Musician and event organizer Jamel Jones, who knows there's no easy fix for the situation, hopes that wide-reaching events at well-regarded venues are a step in the right direction. That's why Jones, a 28-year-old Baltimore native, helped put together Burn Tha Mic, an evening of hip-hop, R&B and gospel performances.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | October 25, 1998
In July the Randallstown Akbar became the Akbar Palace.The name change is significant. Or maybe I should say the lack of name change. The Indian restaurant has a new owner, Chandra Nigam, who has some connections to the former owners. (They still own an Akbar downtown and one in Columbia.).The connection is reflected in both the name and the menu. Nigam has expanded the latter to include some new specialties and some Southern Indian dishes, but what's noteworthy is that there are no great changes.
NEWS
May 23, 1995
An item in Friday's Maryland Live section contained an incorrect address for the new Akbar restaurant in Columbia. Thecorrect address is 9400 Snowden River Parkway.The Sun regrets the errors.
NEWS
By Richard A. Serrano and Richard A. Serrano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 17, 2003
FORT KNOX, Ky. - Two military officers testified yesterday that a man resembling Army Sgt. Asan Akbar warned that their unit was under attack moments before allegedly rolling grenades into headquarters tents in Kuwait in the early days of the war against Iraq in March. The testimony came during the first day of a weeklong preliminary hearing that will determine whether Akbar, 32, a native of Los Angeles, will be tried before a general court-martial. Army prosecutors contend that Akbar struck out against the military by also hurling grenades and shooting at soldiers as they fled from the burning tents.
NEWS
By Richard A. Serrano and Richard A. Serrano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 21, 2003
FORT KNOX, Ky. - An Army investigating officer recommended yesterday that Sgt. Asan Akbar, a Los Angeles soldier accused of a grenade and rifle attack on his superior officers in Kuwait, stand trial at a general court-martial. Lt. Col. Patrick Reinert ruled swiftly after the close of a weeklong preliminary hearing that the March 23 ambush was "a surprise attack executed by stealth." During the hearing, Army prosecutors and defense lawyers argued about whether Akbar deliberately planned the attack or whether he was being falsely accused because of his deeply held Islamic religious beliefs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | November 30, 1995
Maybe all the competition in the neighborhood has kept Akbar on its toes. Mount Vernon has more than its share of good ethnic restaurants, including three good Indian restaurants. Who would have thought that one of them, Akbar, would be even better than when it opened?It's been so long I can't quite remember what Akbar's dining room looked like then, but it seems warmer and cozier now. Banquettes line one wall; on the other side is a floor-to-ceiling mirror that opens up the small room.When Akbar first appeared in a basement dining room under the Green Earth on North Charles Street, it was something Baltimore hadn't seen before: an Indian restaurant that specialized in dishes like crab Malabar (crab meat in a coriander cream sauce)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | August 13, 2009
When it comes to hip-hop, Baltimore doesn't have too many nationally recognized artists. The major hip-hop record labels focus on cities like New York and Atlanta and spend little time or attention on Baltimore. Musician and event organizer Jamel Jones, who knows there's no easy fix for the situation, hopes that wide-reaching events at well-regarded venues are a step in the right direction. That's why Jones, a 28-year-old Baltimore native, helped put together Burn Tha Mic, an evening of hip-hop, R&B and gospel performances.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | August 22, 2007
India Rasoi Akbar Restaurant 823 N. Charles St., Baltimore -- 410-539-0944 Hours --Lunch: 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Monday-Friday, noon-3 p.m. Saturday-Sunday; dinner: 5 p.m.-11 p.m. Sunday-Thursday, 5 p.m.-11:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday Restaurant's estimate --5-10 minutes Ready in --11 minutes The pair of samosas in this order, $4.45, were relatively small and didn't impress us. The dough was decent - slightly salty and fried brown - but the stuffing could...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 13, 2007
KABUL, Afghanistan -- Afghanistan's foreign minister, Rangin Dadfar Spanta, lost a no-confidence vote in parliament yesterday after he was unable to stop the expulsion of tens of thousands of Afghan refugees and illegal workers from Iran in the past three weeks. Spanta was blamed for failing to find a diplomatic solution with Iran that would have prevented the expulsions. He won only 73 votes, while 141 legislators voted against him. Iran has expelled thousands of Afghans before. But the number it expelled this time, more than 50,000, was high for such a short period.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | July 3, 2005
From childhood, Majnum burned with passion for the beautiful Layla, and she returned his devotion. But because the couple could not marry, Majnum went mad and wandered through the wilderness clad only in rags. Then Majnum's friend, seeking to test Layla's love, told her Majnum was dead. This news broke Layla's heart, and she perished from grief. When Majnum arrived at her funeral, so overcome with remorse was he that he leapt into the grave beside his beloved and died on the spot. This tragic tale of star-crossed lovers forms the central chapter of the Khamsa -- or quintet of tales -- by Amir Khusraw, a 13th-century Persian-language poet known as "the Parrot of India."
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 1, 2004
FALLUJAH, Iraq - Blowing up earth berms and emptying sandbags, thousands of Marines abandoned 3-week-old positions in embattled Fallujah yesterday, leaving behind hundreds of Iraqi troops who once served in Saddam Hussein's army to subdue an anti-American insurgency. The effort failed to bring immediate peace. A suicide bomber attacked U.S. armor escorting the U.S. forces, killing two Marines outside the city. Still, the general in charge of U.S. operations in the Middle East characterized the experiment of rearming an old foe as a proxy force as "a possible breakthrough" in the battle to tame Fallujah, in the area known as the Sunni Triangle.
NEWS
By Richard A. Serrano and Richard A. Serrano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 21, 2003
FORT KNOX, Ky. - An Army investigating officer recommended yesterday that Sgt. Asan Akbar, a Los Angeles soldier accused of a grenade and rifle attack on his superior officers in Kuwait, stand trial at a general court-martial. Lt. Col. Patrick Reinert ruled swiftly after the close of a weeklong preliminary hearing that the March 23 ambush was "a surprise attack executed by stealth." During the hearing, Army prosecutors and defense lawyers argued about whether Akbar deliberately planned the attack or whether he was being falsely accused because of his deeply held Islamic religious beliefs.
NEWS
By Richard A. Serrano and Richard A. Serrano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 17, 2003
FORT KNOX, Ky. - Two military officers testified yesterday that a man resembling Army Sgt. Asan Akbar warned that their unit was under attack moments before allegedly rolling grenades into headquarters tents in Kuwait in the early days of the war against Iraq in March. The testimony came during the first day of a weeklong preliminary hearing that will determine whether Akbar, 32, a native of Los Angeles, will be tried before a general court-martial. Army prosecutors contend that Akbar struck out against the military by also hurling grenades and shooting at soldiers as they fled from the burning tents.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 13, 2007
KABUL, Afghanistan -- Afghanistan's foreign minister, Rangin Dadfar Spanta, lost a no-confidence vote in parliament yesterday after he was unable to stop the expulsion of tens of thousands of Afghan refugees and illegal workers from Iran in the past three weeks. Spanta was blamed for failing to find a diplomatic solution with Iran that would have prevented the expulsions. He won only 73 votes, while 141 legislators voted against him. Iran has expelled thousands of Afghans before. But the number it expelled this time, more than 50,000, was high for such a short period.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | July 3, 2005
From childhood, Majnum burned with passion for the beautiful Layla, and she returned his devotion. But because the couple could not marry, Majnum went mad and wandered through the wilderness clad only in rags. Then Majnum's friend, seeking to test Layla's love, told her Majnum was dead. This news broke Layla's heart, and she perished from grief. When Majnum arrived at her funeral, so overcome with remorse was he that he leapt into the grave beside his beloved and died on the spot. This tragic tale of star-crossed lovers forms the central chapter of the Khamsa -- or quintet of tales -- by Amir Khusraw, a 13th-century Persian-language poet known as "the Parrot of India."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | August 17, 2000
Sometimes good restaurants start out when the owner needs a place to eat. I have no idea if Great Fortune (10026 York Road, Cockeysville) will be a great restaurant (it's scheduled to open this week or next), but I do know that the owner - Lo, as he likes to be known - wants a place where he can get a fresh, consistently good lunch in under an hour. His new place is a buffet restaurant with a regular menu of Chinese food. The buffet will have a cold section, with 20 to 30 salads and salad items, and two hot bars.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | August 10, 2000
Jennifer Marx says she and her husband, Michael, searched up and down the East Coast from South Carolina to Maine for a city that would welcome the Nuevo Mexicano and Southwestern restaurant they wanted to open. They found it in Baltimore. To create Blue Agave (1032 Light St.), they spent the last couple of years gutting and renovating the space where the old McHenry Theater was in Federal Hill. Jennifer, who designed the interior, traveled to Mexico for decorative elements. Michael Marx, who's from Southern California, worked with Coyote Cafe, a respected chain of Mexican restaurants, before they moved East.
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