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By Donna Abel and Donna Abel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 7, 1999
PUPILS AT MOUNT Airy Elementary had an opportunity to show off their talents at the school's Science Fair last month.Co-chairs Valerie Gilman and Dana Buswell and hostess Tammy Lyons helped the children find tables to set up their displays and answered questions.Projects included everything from hands-on demonstrations with static electricity to displays of animals and plants, human anatomy/physiology and techniques for treating water.Those attending the event April 21 also had the opportunity to throw water balloons outside as part of one pupil's project on distance and kinetics.
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NEWS
By GINA DAVIS and GINA DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | May 14, 2006
Pauline Buckman may not have been a teacher, but she said her classroom - the school cafeteria - was one place where all of Mount Airy Elementary's pupils spent time when she was in charge back in the 1940s. Helen Simpson, 89, a lifelong Mount Airy resident, credits her longevity to the lessons about good eating habits learned in the lunch line. "She told the kids she has lived to 89 because of eating according to the food pyramid," Buckman, 87, announced during a recent visit at the school.
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NEWS
By Donna Abel and Donna Abel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 28, 2000
MOUNT AIRY Elementary School held its annual talent show on April 13. Songs, dances, skits and poetry and several comedy acts performed by school staff members were featured. Dance performances were given by Brittany Bullock, Stephanie Hettchen, Becky Abel, Christine Shumar, Katie VanSant, Jennifer Fogle, Sarah Culler, Jennifer Skroupa, Brittany Burdette, Michelle Parks, Katia Racine, Jamey Nyberg, Erin Popa, Arianna Franca, Jackie Hood, Melissa Neagle, Damian Bosiacki, Shane Connors, Adam Culler, Kyle Purkey, Danielle Clark, Elisabeth Salmon, Paige Guay, Stepanie Clark, Jessica Sowder, Vassiliki Ellwood, Katerina Chaconas and Maria Chaconas.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2005
Most of Carroll County's 29,004 students will be cool in their air-conditioned classrooms tomorrow, even if typical August temperatures prevail at the start of the 2005-2006 school year. Enrollment has increased by 230 since last year and the county has hired another 212 teachers, bringing the number of employees to 3,383. And nearly all of them will have the comforts of climate control. All but one of the county's 44 school buildings, including its newest and first primary, Parr's Ridge Elementary in Mount Airy, are air-conditioned.
NEWS
By Lesa Jansen and Lesa Jansen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 13, 2002
THEY ARE A group of nine mothers who saw a need, decided what to do and carried out their objective beyond their expectations. It's been more than a year since the Mount Airy Elementary School Playground Committee began meeting to see what could be done to replace the aging and deteriorating playground equipment at their children's school. Now, $47,000 has been raised through their efforts and the first phase of a new playground will be installed this fall. "The wheels of progress are definitely moving," said Lucy Burnett, chairwoman of the Mount Airy Elementary School Playground Committee.
NEWS
By Christy Kruhm and Christy Kruhm,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 27, 2000
AS ONE OF the oldest schools in Carroll County, Mount Airy Elementary boasts a rich past. It's a history school officials, past and present, are working to preserve for future generations. Principal Thomasina Piercy has formed a Celebration of Mount Airy Elementary's History Committee. The committee is collecting pieces of the school's history to foster community spirit. Like many communities in Carroll County, Mount Airy is growing rapidly, with new names and faces entering the school each year.
NEWS
By Christy Kruhm and Christy Kruhm,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 19, 1996
WHILE THOUSANDS of athletes around the world are preparing to compete for Olympic gold this summer in Atlanta, hundreds of students are "reading for the gold" at Mount Airy Elementary School.The theme for this school year's reading incentive program parallels the 1996 Summer Olympic Games. The elementary students are being asked to focus on developing lifelong gold medal reading habits.Students who reach their monthly reading goals will be declared "Gold Medal Readers" and receive a sticker.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | May 28, 1993
Mount Airy Elementary will remain open despite some parents' pleas that the building be closed because of health worries, Carroll school officials said yesterday."
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2002
Faced with the prospect of having two elementary schools nearly back to back, Carroll school officials have recommended converting Mount Airy Elementary into a school for third-, fourth- and fifth-graders and opening a school for primary grades. If approved by the school board, which will discuss the proposal tonight and vote on the recommendation this month, the switch at the 67-year-old school would coincide with the opening of a $13.2 million elementary school in August 2005. The concept of dividing an elementary school between two buildings - called a "split school" - has been around for years.
NEWS
By Lesa Jansen and Lesa Jansen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 23, 2002
SHE'S NURTURED the minds of young pupils whose numbers rise into the thousands. Now, Mount Airy Elementary kindergarten teacher Wendy Gahm has turned her nurturing to the environment, and, in the process, wants to see her school honored for its efforts. Three years ago, Gahm saw a need to spruce up the school's landscaping. She also saw a learning opportunity for herself and her young charges. "I started the Garden Club because I've had an interest in gardening since I was a kid," said Gahm.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2004
Lockers need to be labeled, the calendar needs to be posted, and the nametags need to be laminated for the desks. But Natalie Herrick, who is starting her first year of teaching, is most excited about Monday, when she will meet her pupils. Yesterday was her first full day at Mount Airy Elementary School, where she is one of seven first-grade teachers and the only new one. Her day started with an orientation for all teachers in the cafeteria, but Herrick was concerned about getting her classroom prepared for the pupils, who will be back in less than a week.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2004
Lockers need to be labeled, the calendar needs to be posted, and the name tags need to be laminated for the desks. But Natalie Herrick, who is starting her first year of teaching, is most excited about Monday, when she will meet her pupils. Yesterday was her first full day at Mount Airy Elementary School, where she is one of seven first-grade teachers and the only new one. Her day started with an orientation for all teachers in the cafeteria, but Herrick was concerned about getting her classroom prepared for the pupils, who will be back in less than a week.
NEWS
May 11, 2004
Public hearing on county budget planned tonight A public hearing on Carroll County's proposed $260.7 million budget for fiscal year 2005 is scheduled for 7:30 tonight at Carroll Community College. The proposed spending plan is 6.5 percent higher than this year's budget of $244.7 million. Most of the $16 million increase would go toward schools funding, round-the-clock ambulance service, the Sheriff's Office and the detention center. Residents can submit written comments to county budget director Ted Zaleski, 225 N. Center St., Room 315, Westminster; or ntzaleski@ccg.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2003
New pupils streamed in throughout the school year, oftentimes arriving without anyone to sit with at lunch, talk to on the bus or show them the ropes at Mount Airy Elementary School. Concerned that too many children in the fast-growing area and crowded school were getting thrown into a new classroom without the same doting attention paid to newcomers at the beginning of the school year, guidance counselor Ann Horner decided to make welcoming midyear newcomers a little more hospitable. "I felt like we were getting to the point that new students were coming in so frequently that it was almost like, `Oh, here's another new student,' and they kind of got lost in the shuffle," she said.
NEWS
May 24, 2003
A time to curb the ravages of reckless growth It is about time citizens and elected officials took action to curb irresponsible growth ("Suburbs in fight to curb growth," May 18). As a parent of a fifth-grader who was shunted along with the entire Mount Airy Elementary fifth-grade class to a portable village behind Mount Airy Middle School and of a second-grader who studies in a portable village behind Mount Airy Elementary School, I have had it with the greed of homebuilders and of the elected officials who enabled them.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2003
When Kay Hayes plans reading lessons for her third-graders at Mount Airy Elementary School, the 29-year teaching veteran frequently ends up on something of a scavenger hunt while rummaging for instructional materials. "Now you have to go searching," she said. "You go to the reading books in the school storage room. Each grade level also has a storage site. And then we each have our own supply of materials we've collected over the years. We kind of beg and borrow from each other." But a new collection of books introduced at the school this week - nearly $94,000 worth of teacher guidebooks, lesson planners, pupils' textbooks, intervention handbooks and books targeted for children reading on, below and above grade level - is changing that, teachers and administrators said.
NEWS
By GINA DAVIS and GINA DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | May 14, 2006
Pauline Buckman may not have been a teacher, but she said her classroom - the school cafeteria - was one place where all of Mount Airy Elementary's pupils spent time when she was in charge back in the 1940s. Helen Simpson, 89, a lifelong Mount Airy resident, credits her longevity to the lessons about good eating habits learned in the lunch line. "She told the kids she has lived to 89 because of eating according to the food pyramid," Buckman, 87, announced during a recent visit at the school.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | April 10, 1991
They joke that "it's something in the water."Whatever it is, Mount Airy Elementary School finds itself with an unusual distinction: 16 sets of twins. And another set -- second-graders -- will be added to the school roster in May. Three more sets have registered for kindergarten next year."
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2003
When Kay Hayes plans reading lessons for her third-graders at Mount Airy Elementary School, the 29-year teaching veteran frequently ends up on something of a scavenger hunt while rummaging for instructional materials. "Now, you have to go searching," she said. "You go to the reading books in the school storage room. Each grade level also has a storage site. And then we each have our own supply of materials we've collected over the years. We kind of beg and borrow from each other." But a new collection of books introduced at the school this week - nearly $94,000 worth of teacher guidebooks, lesson planners, pupils' textbooks, intervention handbooks and books targeted for children reading on, below and above grade level - is changing that, teachers and administrators said.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2003
For months, the school scheduled to open in August 2005 in Mount Airy has been referred to as the southwest-area elementary school or, more commonly, the new Mount Airy elementary school. Now Carroll school officials are close to giving the school an official name - and it's likely to have ties to one of the town's first known schools. Parr's Ridge Elementary - one of 94 prospective names submitted for the $14.5 million school and one of three finalists being considered - would recognize the crest on which the town sits.
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