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By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | July 31, 2002
Twenty-six homicides in a month. A 13-year-old caught in a drive-by shooting. A triple killing in South Baltimore. A teen slain while trying to steal a bicycle. July would seem to have been one troubled stretch for the city, leading local news stations to serve up an unhappy cocktail of violence and fear. That leaves viewers with a key question: How could you tell the difference from any other month? The truth about television news on local stations is that it is almost always unrelentingly defined by the violence it serves up at the top of the hour.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2014
If one of the hallmarks of true greatness is consistency, NBC Sports is a truly great operation, because again, it came, it covered, it turned in another top-notch Preakness telecast. Covering a horse race for a mainstream audience is not nearly as easy as NBC Sports makes it look. Among the hardest parts is holding the attention of enough general viewers to earn respectable ratings, while talking to the hardcore horse-race aficionados who are your base audience for such events.
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NEWS
By Ted Rall | April 9, 1996
NEW YORK -- They've torched Huck Finn. They've decided to censor the Internet. They've forced Congress to adapt their moronic "V-chip" rating scheme. Now the Christian fundamentalists who run America have turned on tabloid TV talk shows.At first glance, daytime "trash television" looks like a fat target for censorship. Sally Jessy Raphael's "Teen Sex -- Better in the House Than in the Back of the Car," Ricki Lake's "Fighting Fathers and Stepfathers," Jerry Springer's "Poor Black Teen Buries Her Baby Alive," and Montel Williams' "Teens Who Refuse to Practice Safe Sex" are exploitative themes in the finest tradition of the American kitsch aesthetic.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | March 31, 2009
WYPR to offer free airtime to arts groups Baltimore's highest-rated public radio station announced Monday that it would be offering free airtime to local arts and cultural institutions over the next six months. Beginning with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra on April 6, WYPR-FM (88.1) will broadcast spots that highlight the work of 12 Baltimore-area museums, performance groups and cultural institutions. The spots, or "vignettes," will focus on the mission of each group and will be read by such personalities as conductor Marin Alsop (for the BSO)
NEWS
By From Sun news services | March 31, 2009
WYPR to offer free airtime to arts groups Baltimore's highest-rated public radio station announced Monday that it would be offering free airtime to local arts and cultural institutions over the next six months. Beginning with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra on April 6, WYPR-FM (88.1) will broadcast spots that highlight the work of 12 Baltimore-area museums, performance groups and cultural institutions. The spots, or "vignettes," will focus on the mission of each group and will be read by such personalities as conductor Marin Alsop (for the BSO)
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | June 12, 1995
Some quick observations from three nights of NBC's coverage of the NBA championship series.* The three-man booth with Marv Albert, Matt Guokas and Bill Walton is working far better in this series than it did in the Western Conference telecasts, because Guokas and Walton aren't just arguing for the sake of arguing, as it seemed Walton and Steve Jones were doing out West.And while Walton has made the more outrageous statements, Guokas has been quietly superb so far, with intelligent analysis of play on both sides of the ball.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun Reporter | November 30, 2006
Despite having less campaign money, Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley spent $1 million more on television advertising in the final days of the gubernatorial election than Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., detailed finance reports released yesterday by the Maryland State Board of Elections show. Buoyed by a last-minute, $500,000 loan from retired Washington attorney John P. Coale, O'Malley spent $2.7 million producing television advertisements and buying airtime - mainly through Washington-based firm Media Strategies & Research - between Oct. 23 and Nov. 21, the report shows.
FEATURES
By Randi Henderson | October 23, 1990
It was business as usual -- almost -- for WHFS-FM disc jockey Damian Einstein as he returned to regular duties yesterday morning, 18 months after station management removed him from his DJ slot citing a decline in ratings.Not exactly usual, however, was the bouquet of balloons in the control room reading "Welcome back!" Several flower arrangements in Mr. Einstein's office and dozens of messages faxed in during his 9 a.m.-to-noon on-air shift also were clues that this was not quite an average business day.And if there were any lingering doubts, they were dispelled by the three TV camera crews pressing in to record for posterity (or at least the evening news)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2014
If one of the hallmarks of true greatness is consistency, NBC Sports is a truly great operation, because again, it came, it covered, it turned in another top-notch Preakness telecast. Covering a horse race for a mainstream audience is not nearly as easy as NBC Sports makes it look. Among the hardest parts is holding the attention of enough general viewers to earn respectable ratings, while talking to the hardcore horse-race aficionados who are your base audience for such events.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2000
Energized by a radio debut that he says clicked on all fronts, Rabbi Gavriel Newman yesterday couldn't wait to return to the WCBM studios for Night 2 of his radio show, "Doctoring the Soul." The Feb. 8 kick-off "went better than expected," says Newman, who had been a frequent guest on radio but had never had his own show. "I was very nervous, and I had no idea how people would respond. But the feedback since last week has been outstanding. People were uplifted by the show and really found the issues very relevant to their lives, which is the exact sort of feedback I was hoping to get."
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | August 15, 2008
Forget the city-financed hotel and tourism slogans. Seems all Baltimore needs to reel in out-of-towners is pigs - pigs going to slaughter. Or rather, a festival celebrating the doomed porkers. The annual Pigtown Festival is one of Baltimore's quirkier events - and that's saying something - recalling the days when pigs were herded from the B&O and Union rail yards to the slaughterhouses of South Baltimore. Highlight: the Running of the Pigs, a sort of porcine Pamplona, except the pigs tend to take their time along Washington Boulevard, just as they did when they really were headed for the abattoir.
FEATURES
By Verne Gay | January 3, 2008
Maybe after all this time (seven months since the last edition) and a steady, unremitting, grinding and pitiless decline in audience favor, a refresher is in order. So here goes. The Apprentice: Once the most important program on NBC and a showcase for the world's most unstoppable ego! The future of television! The replacement for Friends! The new king of Thursday nights! An international phenomenon! An advertiser's best friend! Creator of indelible catchphrases ("You're fired!"). And, incidentally, when it first launched almost exactly four years ago, not a bad show, either.
BUSINESS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | September 23, 2007
Turn the radio dial these days and hear show host Troy Duran talking up buying opportunities in stocks of little-known companies that mine gold, uranium and more obscure minerals like molybdenum. Or hear Bob and David Hanson on another program saying that now is the time to buy that vacation home or investment property. But Duran is not an investment professional, and the Hansons aren't impartial experts. Their shows are paid advertisements. Increasingly, this is the sound of talk radio.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,Sun reporter | December 23, 2006
Joe Fitzpatrick's cheeks flushed a rosy red, his long-sleeve T-shirt was soaked with sweat and his chest rose and fell like a sprinter nearing the finish line, but he wasn't quitting until the video camera trained on his feet captured a perfect image of his skateboarding stunt work. At least a hundred, maybe 200 times, Fitzpatrick, 17, kick-flipped his board hard on the concrete at an abandoned lumber yard in White Marsh and smoothly sailed along on his board at almost a 90-degree angle.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun Reporter | November 30, 2006
Despite having less campaign money, Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley spent $1 million more on television advertising in the final days of the gubernatorial election than Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., detailed finance reports released yesterday by the Maryland State Board of Elections show. Buoyed by a last-minute, $500,000 loan from retired Washington attorney John P. Coale, O'Malley spent $2.7 million producing television advertisements and buying airtime - mainly through Washington-based firm Media Strategies & Research - between Oct. 23 and Nov. 21, the report shows.
FEATURES
By Alexa James and Alexa James,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2002
Tonight, catch one of Maryland's own, where the wild things are. Former Miss Maryland Megan Gunning makes her pitch for a new job, as one of the featured applicants on E!'s Wild On Wants You. The show, set for 10 p.m., is the latest chapter in the cable network's continuing search for a new host for Wild On, a televised tour of the world's coolest hot spots. Although Gunning, 24, was not one of a dozen finalists for the job, she'll still get her moment of cable-TV glory. Tonight, the Fallston resident will be seen at Lulu's Mardi Gras Club in Washington, part of Wild On Wants You: The Heartland.
TOPIC
By Josh Silver | January 21, 2001
AS ELECTION DAY recedes into history, the fund-raising frenzy has been tallied, and the situation is bleak. Not just because the average U.S. senator spent over $5.5 million to win election, or because the two major presidential candidates spent over $300 million in hard money, or because the amount spent in the 2000 elections is up more than a third from 1996, or that the moneyed interests that invested in their candidates are set to receive the requisite...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | September 2, 2001
Like many other fans of R&B singer Aaliyah, I awoke last Sunday to a shock: the news of a plane crash that had killed her the night before. I felt disbelief, horror and sadness. I'd been a fan since her first hit, 1994's sultry Back and Forth, and had liked her more as she churned out hits like Try Again, won Grammy nominations and starred in last year's Romeo Must Die. But as the day dragged on and I listened to Aaliyah sporadically playing on the radio, my sorrow gradually subsided.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | July 31, 2002
Twenty-six homicides in a month. A 13-year-old caught in a drive-by shooting. A triple killing in South Baltimore. A teen slain while trying to steal a bicycle. July would seem to have been one troubled stretch for the city, leading local news stations to serve up an unhappy cocktail of violence and fear. That leaves viewers with a key question: How could you tell the difference from any other month? The truth about television news on local stations is that it is almost always unrelentingly defined by the violence it serves up at the top of the hour.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | September 2, 2001
Like many other fans of R&B singer Aaliyah, I awoke last Sunday to a shock: the news of a plane crash that had killed her the night before. I felt disbelief, horror and sadness. I'd been a fan since her first hit, 1994's sultry Back and Forth, and had liked her more as she churned out hits like Try Again, won Grammy nominations and starred in last year's Romeo Must Die. But as the day dragged on and I listened to Aaliyah sporadically playing on the radio, my sorrow gradually subsided.
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