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By JoAnna Daemmrich | March 11, 1991
The 19-year-old in the leather trench coat made his big mistake when he fumbled through a briefcase full of cash at a small, security-conscious Virginia airport Saturday afternoon.Trying to buy a one-way ticket to Philadelphia, robbery suspect Sadiyq Abdullah Muhammed, also known as Tony Bedford, already stood out at the Newport News-Williamsburg Airport with his flashy coat and gold chains.A ticket agent became suspicious after a request for identification led the young man to fish through a briefcase stuffed with $100 bills, airport police said yesterday, explaining how tightened security since the Persian Gulf War helped net their biggest arrest in years.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2011
A Virginia couple, staying at a hotel near the airport, was forced into a vehicle as a Glen Burnie man attempted to rob them Thursday, Anne Arundel County police said. The 43-year-old woman and 44-year-old man from Richmond were getting into their vehicle at about 9:45 p.m. near a restaurant in the area of West Nursery Road and Winterson Road when an armed man forced them into their vehicle and demanded money, police said. The couple told him they had no money but had some in their nearby hotel in the 1100 block of Winterson Road, near BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport.
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NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | August 14, 1997
James J. Harrison Jr., whose wife's slaying remains a mystery, was arrested Tuesday and charged with punching an airport police officer after US Airways had refused to let him board a plane for Florida, where he was going to visit his grandson.Harrison, 60, of the 600 block of W. Timonium Road was charged with disorderly conduct, second-degree assault on a police officer and resisting arrest. He was released on his own recognizance shortly after midnight yesterday.As he was being released, Harrison scrawled "I am completely innocent!
TRAVEL
By Jane Engle and Jane Engle,Los Angeles Times | July 20, 2008
LOS ANGELES - Jeffrey R. Neuman had flown halfway to Chicago when he glanced at his wrist and "got a sinking feeling." His vintage Cartier watch, which his wife gave him two decades ago, was missing. Panicked, the marketing executive asked her to call lost-and-found at Los Angeles International Airport while he tried to find a replacement online. She called the Transportation Security Administration. "I knew it wouldn't be at the TSA," Neuman said. He was wrong. He had left the watch at a security checkpoint, and TSA staff offered to express mail it to him. Like Neuman, thousands of passengers leave behind treasures at Los Angeles and other airport security checkpoints every year.
NEWS
March 24, 2003
Using BWI? Plan ahead and arrive early Officials at Baltimore-Washington International Airport are advising travelers to plan ahead when traveling. Travelers should contact their airlines to check on the status of flights or to change plans before arriving at the airport. Passengers should check in 90 minutes before domestic flights and two hours before international flights. Travelers should be aware of the increased police presence, police-dog patrols and vehicle inspections. They should also remember to avoid leaving luggage and bags unattended in the airport terminal.
TRAVEL
By Jane Engle and Jane Engle,Los Angeles Times | July 20, 2008
LOS ANGELES - Jeffrey R. Neuman had flown halfway to Chicago when he glanced at his wrist and "got a sinking feeling." His vintage Cartier watch, which his wife gave him two decades ago, was missing. Panicked, the marketing executive asked her to call lost-and-found at Los Angeles International Airport while he tried to find a replacement online. She called the Transportation Security Administration. "I knew it wouldn't be at the TSA," Neuman said. He was wrong. He had left the watch at a security checkpoint, and TSA staff offered to express mail it to him. Like Neuman, thousands of passengers leave behind treasures at Los Angeles and other airport security checkpoints every year.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2001
The orange fence blocks now-forbidden parking spaces, the yellow signs warn of security checkpoints. Airport personnel flashing red badges flock to help those in line, while airport police in blue windbreakers rush between the conveyor belts and the ticket counters. Baltimore-Washington International Airport looked as close to normal as it has since it shut down one week ago, after terrorists hijacked four planes and killed thousands of people. But for the region's busiest airport, normal won't be the same, at least for the time being.
NEWS
By Bob Pool and Bob Pool,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 17, 2004
LOS ANGELES - He speaks only an obscure tribal dialect found in a corner of Vietnam's Pleiku district. So for nearly a month, a homesick Vietnamese refugee stranded at Los Angeles International Airport slept on airport benches and spent his days silently dreaming of getting out of Los Angeles. Then the man yearning to see relatives in one of Vietnam's Montagnard villages was embraced by an unexpected "family" - airport police, airline employees and others who work at Tom Bradley International Terminal and offered him food and shelter.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1996
The baggage claim operation at Baltimore-Washington International Airport is no better or worse than at any other airport around the country, despite fears raised by the arrest of a Baltimore man who police say was part of a ring of thieves that stole luggage from carousels.Less than 1 percent of passengers at BWI report bags stolen to airport police each year. In 1995 -- the year officials say the theft ring began operating -- 131 bags were reported stolen from 13.2 million customers, according to Kerry Brandt, Maryland Transportation Authority Police spokesmanThis year, 62 bags have been reported stolen from 7.7 million passengers who used BWI through July.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER and MICHAEL DRESSER,SUN REPORTER | July 16, 2006
Top officials of the Maryland Transportation Authority Police have ordered officers to destroy records of the extra security the department provides to VIPs at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport - expunging the paper trail showing its armed escorts of celebrities. Based on such documents, The Sun reported May 17 that the department had adopted a practice of routinely providing free escorts by uniformed officers to sports and entertainment stars upon request. Among those receiving such special treatment - unusual for American airports-were former Orioles stars Cal Ripken Jr. and Eddie Murray.
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 19, 2007
MOSCOW -- Former chess champion Garry Kasparov is finding out what it means to take on the Kremlin. Last month he was arrested by Moscow riot police at a pro-democracy march he helped organize and then grilled by Russian security agents on suspicion of seeding extremism. Yesterday, as he checked in at Moscow's Sheremetyevo Airport for a morning flight to the Volga River city of Samara to take part in a protest march coinciding with a Russia-European Union summit, a Russian police officer approached.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER and MICHAEL DRESSER,SUN REPORTER | July 16, 2006
Top officials of the Maryland Transportation Authority Police have ordered officers to destroy records of the extra security the department provides to VIPs at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport - expunging the paper trail showing its armed escorts of celebrities. Based on such documents, The Sun reported May 17 that the department had adopted a practice of routinely providing free escorts by uniformed officers to sports and entertainment stars upon request. Among those receiving such special treatment - unusual for American airports-were former Orioles stars Cal Ripken Jr. and Eddie Murray.
NEWS
By Bob Pool and Bob Pool,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 17, 2004
LOS ANGELES - He speaks only an obscure tribal dialect found in a corner of Vietnam's Pleiku district. So for nearly a month, a homesick Vietnamese refugee stranded at Los Angeles International Airport slept on airport benches and spent his days silently dreaming of getting out of Los Angeles. Then the man yearning to see relatives in one of Vietnam's Montagnard villages was embraced by an unexpected "family" - airport police, airline employees and others who work at Tom Bradley International Terminal and offered him food and shelter.
NEWS
March 24, 2003
Using BWI? Plan ahead and arrive early Officials at Baltimore-Washington International Airport are advising travelers to plan ahead when traveling. Travelers should contact their airlines to check on the status of flights or to change plans before arriving at the airport. Passengers should check in 90 minutes before domestic flights and two hours before international flights. Travelers should be aware of the increased police presence, police-dog patrols and vehicle inspections. They should also remember to avoid leaving luggage and bags unattended in the airport terminal.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 12, 2001
WASHINGTON - A month to the day after hijackers turned commercial airliners into lethal weapons, the Senate moved to tighten airport security and give police sweeping new powers to help track down terrorists. By a vote of 100-0, the Senate agreed after days of delaying tactics to hire thousands of new federal workers to screen passengers and baggage at airport gates, replacing the contract employees retained by airlines who have been doing these jobs for years. "We knew we were going to have to be bipartisan if we were going to get any kind of real security in the airports and air travel in this country," said Sen. Ernest F. Hollings, the South Carolina Democrat who chairs the Commerce Committee.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2001
The orange fence blocks now-forbidden parking spaces, the yellow signs warn of security checkpoints. Airport personnel flashing red badges flock to help those in line, while airport police in blue windbreakers rush between the conveyor belts and the ticket counters. Baltimore-Washington International Airport looked as close to normal as it has since it shut down one week ago, after terrorists hijacked four planes and killed thousands of people. But for the region's busiest airport, normal won't be the same, at least for the time being.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2011
A Virginia couple, staying at a hotel near the airport, was forced into a vehicle as a Glen Burnie man attempted to rob them Thursday, Anne Arundel County police said. The 43-year-old woman and 44-year-old man from Richmond were getting into their vehicle at about 9:45 p.m. near a restaurant in the area of West Nursery Road and Winterson Road when an armed man forced them into their vehicle and demanded money, police said. The couple told him they had no money but had some in their nearby hotel in the 1100 block of Winterson Road, near BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport.
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 19, 2007
MOSCOW -- Former chess champion Garry Kasparov is finding out what it means to take on the Kremlin. Last month he was arrested by Moscow riot police at a pro-democracy march he helped organize and then grilled by Russian security agents on suspicion of seeding extremism. Yesterday, as he checked in at Moscow's Sheremetyevo Airport for a morning flight to the Volga River city of Samara to take part in a protest march coinciding with a Russia-European Union summit, a Russian police officer approached.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | August 14, 1997
James J. Harrison Jr., whose wife's slaying remains a mystery, was arrested Tuesday and charged with punching an airport police officer after US Airways had refused to let him board a plane for Florida, where he was going to visit his grandson.Harrison, 60, of the 600 block of W. Timonium Road was charged with disorderly conduct, second-degree assault on a police officer and resisting arrest. He was released on his own recognizance shortly after midnight yesterday.As he was being released, Harrison scrawled "I am completely innocent!
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1996
The baggage claim operation at Baltimore-Washington International Airport is no better or worse than at any other airport around the country, despite fears raised by the arrest of a Baltimore man who police say was part of a ring of thieves that stole luggage from carousels.Less than 1 percent of passengers at BWI report bags stolen to airport police each year. In 1995 -- the year officials say the theft ring began operating -- 131 bags were reported stolen from 13.2 million customers, according to Kerry Brandt, Maryland Transportation Authority Police spokesmanThis year, 62 bags have been reported stolen from 7.7 million passengers who used BWI through July.
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