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By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
Wings stood off to one side. The propeller lay in a carton. But the main part of Carl Kesselring's pet project was clearly recognizable as an airplane in progress. "I don't have fear of getting in an airplane," he said, standing in a hangar in Suburban Airport in Laurel surrounded by tools, parts and the remains of a bird's nest that fell through a hole in the roof. "I have confidence in my ability to make it work properly. " Kesselring's daring hobby is increasingly shared by other enthusiasts as the number of amateur-built airplanes grows every year, according to the Experimental Aircraft Association.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
Dolores B. Scott, a retired educator and librarian who taught in Baltimore public schools for three decades and was a world traveler, died Nov. 19 of Alzheimer's disease at Chaparral Winds Hospice in Sun City West, Ariz. The longtime Randallstown resident was 86. The daughter of Howard Brown, a hotel headwaiter, and Eva Brown, a homemaker, Dolores Brown was born in Baltimore and raised in the 2300 block of McCulloh St. in the city's Sugar Hill neighborhood. Mrs. Scott graduated with honors in 1945 from Frederick Douglass High School and was second in her class at what is now Coppin State University, where she earned her bachelor's degree in 1949.
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TOPIC
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2003
We think of war and we think of airplanes. But when Orville and Wilbur Wright invented the airplane a century ago, they did not envision massive aerial bombardments of "shock and awe." In fact, the Ohio brothers once thought their invention would become the great deterrent to warfare. It was an idea shared by many after the inception of flight. War would become practically impossible, the brothers thought, because the scouting done by aircraft would equalize opposing nations with information on each other's movements, preventing surprise attacks.
NEWS
June 21, 2013
Scale model aircraft take to the skies at Airplanes of the World, Saturday, June 22 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Konterra Model Air Park, 6050 Van Dusen Road. Spectators are welcome; remote control pilots are required to pay a $10 fee and have a current valid American Modelers Association membership card to participate. Watch the flight of scale-model aircraft ranging from biplanes of early 20th-century up to today's jets, including fixed wing, helicopter, electric, gas and glow.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2013
Sol Kramer, who turned a Depression-era 15-cent balsa toy airplane business into a leading wholesale hobby empire, died of pneumonia April 24 at Hospice by the Sea in Pompano Beach, Fla. The former Pikesville resident was 96. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Lithuanian immigrants. His father, Morris, was a Saratoga Street tailor. His mother, Dora, was a homemaker. Mr. Kramer was a graduate of the old Robert E. Lee School and received his diploma from City College at age 14. "He and his brother, Lou, belonged to the Junior Birdmen of America, a model airplane club promoted by the Hearst newspapers," said his son, Dr. Karl Kramer of Coral Gables, Fla. "His brother was really the airplane builder.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 16, 2001
Having your first film as a director hailed as one of the funniest comedies in movie history is pretty heady stuff. But when, more than 20 years later, the accolades continue - when even the august American Film Institute ranks it among America's all-time 10 best laugh-fests - does the head rush continue? Well, maybe the adrenaline doesn't pump as fast. But for Jerry Zucker, the idea of being one of the warped brains that begat Airplane! is still something to be savored. "The legacy of Airplane!
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2002
FONTANA, Calif. -Eight days after a near-fatal airplane crash, Winston Cup car owner Jack Roush was sitting up in his hospital bed taking part in a telephone news conference. "I'd estimate less than five out of a hundred would have survived these injuries, let alone be on the phone for a press conference," said Roush's doctor, Samuel Wyndham, assistant professor of surgery at the University of Alabama-Birmingham's Division of Trauma, Burns and Surgical Critical Care, referring to the critical head, lung, rib and leg injuries Roush sustained.
TOPIC
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2003
One in a series of occasional articles With the luster of its potential tarnished by a century of use, it now seems odd to think of the airplane as anything more than a convenient way to get from one city or country to another. But at the turn of the century, some believed that the technology was capable of bringing about profound social change, including promoting greater equality for women and African-Americans. The notion gained proponents among a smattering of women and black pilots during the "Golden Age of Aviation" - a 20-year period between the two world wars when aviation was in its infancy and flying machines were wondrous.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2010
They twist and turn, fly in a straight line and plummet to earth in death spirals. In the hands of an expert like 16-year-old Zach Bury, remote-controlled aircraft can do almost anything. But most of all, they amaze. "Imagine taking a quarter, flipping it, and watching it twisting and falling at the same time — that's how fast these things are flipping," says proud papa Wayne Bury, who marvels at what Zach can make his 5-foot-wide model helicopter do. "What my son does, he does really well.
NEWS
December 5, 1999
1947: First supersonic airplane1947: Bell Labs invents transistor1947: Polaroid camera developed1948: Israel created
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2013
I have always been fascinated with shipwrecks, the granddaddy being the Titanic, followed by the Andrea Doria, and the nether world where they dwell, tragic relics frozen in time. Wrecked airplanes also do it for me. I remember looking at an issue of Life magazine around 1960 and being transfixed by the haunting color images of the Lady Be Good, a B-24 Liberator bomber that had overflown its base in Italy while returning from a 1943 mission and then crash-landed in the Libyan desert.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
Wings stood off to one side. The propeller lay in a carton. But the main part of Carl Kesselring's pet project was clearly recognizable as an airplane in progress. "I don't have fear of getting in an airplane," he said, standing in a hangar in Suburban Airport in Laurel surrounded by tools, parts and the remains of a bird's nest that fell through a hole in the roof. "I have confidence in my ability to make it work properly. " Kesselring's daring hobby is increasingly shared by other enthusiasts as the number of amateur-built airplanes grows every year, according to the Experimental Aircraft Association.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Blair Ames, Baltimore Sun Media Group | May 6, 2013
Federal investigators began examining Monday the wreckage of a two-seater, home-built airplane that crashed Sunday in Virginia, killing a man from Davidsonville and his son from Westminster, the father of 10 children. On Saturday, experimental airplane owner and pilot Barry Raymond Newgent, 73, and his passenger and son, Thomas Barry Newgent, 51, were bound for the Virginia Regional Festival of Flight, a weekend air show. The other small airplanes in a group of four traveling from Maryland arrived safely.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2013
Sol Kramer, who turned a Depression-era 15-cent balsa toy airplane business into a leading wholesale hobby empire, died of pneumonia April 24 at Hospice by the Sea in Pompano Beach, Fla. The former Pikesville resident was 96. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Lithuanian immigrants. His father, Morris, was a Saratoga Street tailor. His mother, Dora, was a homemaker. Mr. Kramer was a graduate of the old Robert E. Lee School and received his diploma from City College at age 14. "He and his brother, Lou, belonged to the Junior Birdmen of America, a model airplane club promoted by the Hearst newspapers," said his son, Dr. Karl Kramer of Coral Gables, Fla. "His brother was really the airplane builder.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2012
A company that manufactures airplanes in Hagerstown that are used to monitor the nation's borders would receive $43 million to continue production under legislation approved by the U.S. Senate Appropriations Committee on Tuesday. Sierra Nevada Corp., a Nevada-based company with a plant in Hagerstown, outfits the twin-engine aircraft with sensors that assist Customs and Border Patrol agents on the ground with catching people who cross the border into the U.S. illegally. If approved by Congress, the funding will keep the company's production line open, allowing it to begin work on two new aircraft.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2012
A 56-year-old Maryland man was killed Sunday when a small plane crashed into a cornfield near York, Pa., York County authorities reported. The man, who has not been identified pending notification of his family, was the lone occupant of a Piper PA-28 180 that crashed about 12:42 p.m. near the York airport in Jackson Township. The National Transportation Safety Board announced on Twitter that it would investigate the crash. The small plane crash is the second to occur in the township in the last two months.
FEATURES
November 29, 2005
Almanac Nov. 29--1929 Navy Lt. Cmdr. Richard E. Byrd radioed that he'd made the first airplane flight over the South Pole.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | May 26, 1996
I am feeling great, and I will tell you why. It's because of this article I read recently that said ... um ... it said ... OK, wait just a minute while I get out this article. ...OK, here it is: According to this article, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania did a study showing that, as males -- but not females -- get older, their brains shrink. Was I ever relieved to read that! I thought it was just me!Here's something I regularly do: I'm walking through an airport, and I see a newsstand, and I think: "Huh!
NEWS
By Elizabeth Elder | September 25, 2011
The roar builds. In a moment, we will begin to inch forward, accelerating quickly toward speed, toward hurtling down the runway. Every seat is filled. I am by the window. The young woman next to me might be a student; next to her is the affable, middle-aged man who helped me with my carry-on. There is a family with small children, an older couple in wheelchairs, some teenagers and many who are traveling alone, all with their own purposes. We are strangers sharing our immediate location and our immediate destination.
EXPLORE
By Louise Vest | August 16, 2011
100 Years Ago Beastly Advertised in the Times was a show coming to the streets of Ellicott City that included exotic animals and one of those new fangled airplanes. The "Metor" Aereoplane demonstration was advertised along with a picture of the plane. "The Greatest Spectacle of the Age: Hagg's Shows, August 24, 1911: Don't Miss the Parade: Don't fail to witness the massive, magnificent free street parade at 10 o'clock on exhibition day. Lions, tigers, leopards, and all animals of the jungles in pens for your inspection, FREE.
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