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By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Evening Sun Staff | December 9, 1991
When fire destroyed Blazie Engineering's building in the rural Harford County community of Street Oct. 18, causing $2 million in damage, the family-owned business had to scramble to find new quarters.After a two-week stint during which the company operated out of the basement of Dean and Marty Blazie's home and a garage, the owners quickly secured temporary space at the Forest Hill Business Airpark near Bel Air. Now, less than two months after the fire, the Blazies are making plans to build a new 11,000-square foot building at the airpark.
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NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2004
The auction of a Harford County airpark, which gained national attention in 1994 after a pilot stole a plane from there and crashed it on the White House lawn, was stopped unexpectedly yesterday by an early-morning deal that kept the airpark in the hands of two of its shareholders. But in a twist, the two shareholders were also involved in lawsuits against the Harford County Airpark in the 1990s that ultimately pushed it to insolvency. Fred Simmons, an Aberdeen insurance agent and a trustee at Harford Community College, and Churchville accountant Steven Wright are to become majority owners of the park in exchange for dropping further legal claims against the Harford County Airpark Owners Group Inc., Wright said yesterday.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | February 10, 1993
It was 1927 when George A. Levis learned to fly -- the same year Charles A. Lindbergh flew alone across the Atlantic.Mr. Levis was only 17 that year -- eight years younger than Lindbergh, and no cheering throngs met him when he landed.Today Mr. Levis is 83, and he's still flying.He looks only 63 and still gets about 50 hours of flight time a year, firing up his 115 horsepower 1946 Piper Super Cruiser and climbing into the skies above White Marsh.He is one of a comradely band of aviators who fly regularly out of Baltimore Airpark, the tiny airstrip that motorists glimpse on their right as they zip south on Interstate 95 just north of White Marsh.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | January 2, 2004
Some residents of a western Howard community are lobbying the County Council to allow more of their neighbors to land - and take off - in their back yards. County zoning regulations allow three small airplanes to be stored by the eight property owners at Glenair, a residential airpark in Glenwood. That's because the community maintains a 100-foot setback on each side of its grassy runway. With a 200-foot setback, the code permits 12 airplanes. Ella Atkins, an assistant professor of aerospace engineering at the University of Maryland, said the difference between the two restrictions is arbitrary.
NEWS
By Lisa T. Hill and Lisa T. Hill,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 18, 1996
Among the farms and private homes near Keymar and Taneytown -- within sight of the Catoctin Mountains -- one of Carroll's few remaining private airstrips is being sold.Owners Robert and Winifred Miller, who built Keymar Airpark in 1970, both said they are getting too old to maintain the strip, and living on fixed incomes doesn't leave much money for extras, Mr. Miller said.A retired school bus contractor and farmer, Mr. Miller said a friend talked him into getting his pilot's license more than a quarter-century ago. I really liked it," he said.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1997
A Baltimore pilot was seriously injured yesterday when his single-engine plane crashed into dense woods about 400 yards east of the runway at Clearview Airpark near Westminster.Jerome Lamprecht, 72, of the 1200 block of W. Lake Ave. was taken by state MedEvac helicopter to Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore, where he was in serious but stable condition, a hospital spokeswoman said last night.No one on the ground was injured, state police said.Federal Aviation Administration officials were called to investigate, but police said pilot error appeared to have caused the crash at 2: 18 p.m.Lowell Seal, who has owned and operated Clearview Airpark for about 25 years, said he was standing near the runway when a red and white Beechcraft Bonanza began to land downwind, meaning it approached the 1,845-foot runway from the northwest with a tail wind of about 8 to 10 knots.
NEWS
April 22, 1999
IN MANY PLACES, the prospect of turning 60 acres of open space into a subdivision of 150 homes usually generates instant opposition. Neighbors of C. Earle Mace's Baltimore Airpark in northeastern Baltimore County seem resigned, however, to losing this airstrip to new housing."
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1996
After another hot day on the runway, C. Earle Mace returns to his comfortably cluttered house for a home-cooked supper of baked chicken and the season's first home-grown string beans. With an angular, sun-broiled face, sinewy arms and navy work shirt, he is a picture of blue-collar man.And even as he nears his 70th birthday, Mace wouldn't trade his hard-working ways for a million bucks.His price is $4 million.That's how much he's asking for the 60 acres that are home to his Baltimore Airpark, the small airstrip that some Baltimore County officials covet as a site for a recreation complex to serve the fast-growing White Marsh area.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1999
It's not as if C. Earle Mace is going to get all sentimental or anything.Yes, developers have unveiled a plan to build nearly 150 houses at his Baltimore Airpark, the small landing strip passed daily by thousands of commuters on Interstate 95 in White Marsh. Yes, the neighborhood's main drag would trace the path of the runway he paved and maintained for decades.Earle Mace turned a dirt, country landing strip into a once-thriving airport where amateur pilots flew off in search of business and pleasure.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | January 2, 2004
Some residents of a western Howard community are lobbying the County Council to allow more of their neighbors to land - and take off - in their back yards. County zoning regulations allow three small airplanes to be stored by the eight property owners at Glenair, a residential airpark in Glenwood. That's because the community maintains a 100-foot setback on each side of its grassy runway. With a 200-foot setback, the code permits 12 airplanes. Ella Atkins, an assistant professor of aerospace engineering at the University of Maryland, said the difference between the two restrictions is arbitrary.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | January 2, 2004
Some residents of a western Howard community are lobbying the County Council to allow more of their neighbors to land - and take off - in their back yards. County zoning regulations allow three small airplanes to be stored by the eight property owners at Glenair, a residential airpark in Glenwood. That's because the community maintains a 100-foot setback on each side of its grassy runway. With a 200-foot setback, the code permits 12 airplanes. Ella Atkins, an assistant professor of aerospace engineering at the University of Maryland, College Park, said the difference between the two restrictions is arbitrary.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2003
Federal investigators piecing together the weekend crash of a Czech-made jet in a Harford County community focused yesterday on the wings as a possible contributor to the fiery incident, which killed the pilot. Steve Demko, lead investigator on the case with the National Transportation Safety Board, said an engine specialist with the agency visited the scene early yesterday. The engine appeared to have been trying to gain power when the plane crashed in the community of Forest Hill, he said, adding that the wing flaps might have stalled, causing the Aero L-39Z0 Albatros to come down at a steep 50-degree angle.
NEWS
April 22, 1999
IN MANY PLACES, the prospect of turning 60 acres of open space into a subdivision of 150 homes usually generates instant opposition. Neighbors of C. Earle Mace's Baltimore Airpark in northeastern Baltimore County seem resigned, however, to losing this airstrip to new housing."
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1999
It's not as if C. Earle Mace is going to get all sentimental or anything.Yes, developers have unveiled a plan to build nearly 150 houses at his Baltimore Airpark, the small landing strip passed daily by thousands of commuters on Interstate 95 in White Marsh. Yes, the neighborhood's main drag would trace the path of the runway he paved and maintained for decades.Earle Mace turned a dirt, country landing strip into a once-thriving airport where amateur pilots flew off in search of business and pleasure.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1997
A Baltimore pilot was seriously injured yesterday when his single-engine plane crashed into dense woods about 400 yards east of the runway at Clearview Airpark near Westminster.Jerome Lamprecht, 72, of the 1200 block of W. Lake Ave. was taken by state MedEvac helicopter to Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore, where he was in serious but stable condition, a hospital spokeswoman said last night.No one on the ground was injured, state police said.Federal Aviation Administration officials were called to investigate, but police said pilot error appeared to have caused the crash at 2: 18 p.m.Lowell Seal, who has owned and operated Clearview Airpark for about 25 years, said he was standing near the runway when a red and white Beechcraft Bonanza began to land downwind, meaning it approached the 1,845-foot runway from the northwest with a tail wind of about 8 to 10 knots.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1996
Federal Aviation Administration officials are investigating an airplane crash Sunday near Taylorsville and the emergency landing of another plane earlier that day on Route 27 near Westminster, authorities said.An Eldersburg pilot and his 15-year-old son stumbled away from their single-engine plane after crashing into trees off the runway at Clearview Airpark near Taylorsville about 6 p.m., state police said. The pair were returning from an air show at Glenn L. Martin State Airport in Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | January 2, 2004
Some residents of a western Howard community are lobbying the County Council to allow more of their neighbors to land - and take off - in their back yards. County zoning regulations allow three small airplanes to be stored by the eight property owners at Glenair, a residential airpark in Glenwood. That's because the community maintains a 100-foot setback on each side of its grassy runway. With a 200-foot setback, the code permits 12 airplanes. Ella Atkins, an assistant professor of aerospace engineering at the University of Maryland, College Park, said the difference between the two restrictions is arbitrary.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1996
Federal Aviation Administration officials are investigating an airplane crash Sunday near Taylorsville and the emergency landing of another plane earlier that day on Route 27 near Westminster, authorities said.An Eldersburg pilot and his 15-year-old son stumbled away from their single-engine plane after crashing into trees off the runway at Clearview Airpark near Taylorsville about 6 p.m., state police said. The pair were returning from an air show at Glenn L. Martin State Airport in Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1996
After another hot day on the runway, C. Earle Mace returns to his comfortably cluttered house for a home-cooked supper of baked chicken and the season's first home-grown string beans. With an angular, sun-broiled face, sinewy arms and navy work shirt, he is a picture of blue-collar man.And even as he nears his 70th birthday, Mace wouldn't trade his hard-working ways for a million bucks.His price is $4 million.That's how much he's asking for the 60 acres that are home to his Baltimore Airpark, the small airstrip that some Baltimore County officials covet as a site for a recreation complex to serve the fast-growing White Marsh area.
NEWS
By Lisa T. Hill and Lisa T. Hill,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 18, 1996
Among the farms and private homes near Keymar and Taneytown -- within sight of the Catoctin Mountains -- one of Carroll's few remaining private airstrips is being sold.Owners Robert and Winifred Miller, who built Keymar Airpark in 1970, both said they are getting too old to maintain the strip, and living on fixed incomes doesn't leave much money for extras, Mr. Miller said.A retired school bus contractor and farmer, Mr. Miller said a friend talked him into getting his pilot's license more than a quarter-century ago. I really liked it," he said.
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