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NEWS
By SYEVE CHAPMAN | August 17, 2007
In a season of crowded planes, long security lines and numerous delays, there are only two kinds of travelers: those who dislike the airlines, and those who loathe and abominate the entire industry with every fiber of their being. So the Department of Transportation is not risking a mass revolt when it entertains the idea of making carriers pay large sums to passengers who, after buying a ticket, find it doesn't come with a seat. Airlines overbook to ensure full flights, but when everyone shows up, not everyone gets to go. Involuntary "bumping" of passengers is an old custom that has gotten more onerous, since it's not as easy to get on the next flight as it used to be. So groups claiming to represent consumers have been demanding that the government force airlines to boost their compensation.
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FEATURES
By Chris Barnett and Chris Barnett,Copley News Service | November 28, 1993
At 1,350 mph, the supersonic Concorde is the ultimate thrill ride, and now the "First Lady of the Skies" is courting new passengers with new comforts, conveniences, even a few bargain fares.British Airways and Air France are the world's only airlines operating the 100-seat, needle-nosed jetliners today. The British are pouring on the perks; the French are wheeling and dealing. The passengers -- mostly businesspeople who make every minute count -- are reaping a bonanza of benefits.Meanwhile, for travelers who want to impress their friends or customers, both airlines are now chartering Concorde for custom, exotic tours.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | April 14, 2008
The government crackdown on airlines over alleged safety lapses fits a familiar storyline: Conscientious regulators saving the public from heartless corporations that put lives at risk to fatten profits. It's a tale that would be perfect for a movie - since movies are famous for taking liberties with the truth. In real life, this story may not have a happy ending. By forcing the cancellation of thousands of flights, the Federal Aviation Administration most likely did not prevent fatalities but caused them.
BUSINESS
By Peter Pae and Peter Pae,Los Angeles Times | April 18, 2007
When the airline industry went into a tailspin after the 2001 terrorist attacks, pilots, flight attendants and mechanics at American Airlines agreed to billions of dollars in cuts in wages and benefits to keep the carrier afloat. Now AMR Corp., American's parent, is back in the black, so much so that 874 top executives will receive more than $150 million in stock bonuses this week. That has the 57,000 rank-and-file employees seeing red. "We made huge sacrifices," said Dana Davis, an 18-year American employee and spokeswoman for the Association of Professional Flight Attendants.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | January 1, 1995
The record growth in passengers at Baltimore-Washington International Airport will taper off this year as the nation's fastest growing airport comes back to earth.But BWI will continue to experience another kind of boom, moving forth with $400 million in construction projects over the next five years. The work -- ranging from a new international terminal to roadway expansions -- is the largest single, capital improvement program in the airport's 22-year history.After growing by more than 2 million passengers in 1994, traffic at the state-owned BWI should increase only slightly this year.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr. and John H. Gormley Jr.,Staff Writer | April 17, 1992
If you are gnashing your teeth because you bought an airplane ticket before the airlines began slashing prices last week, don't despair. There's a good chance you can fly at the new lower fares.Although many passengers aren't aware of it, most airlines will refund the difference if you ask. And many travel agencies are contacting their customers who are eligible for refunds and issuing them new tickets at lower prices, generally at no charge.Steven Durham, senior travel counselor for Ramsay Scarlett Travel Inc. in Baltimore, said, "We're very proud of the fact we give excellent service to our customers.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 27, 1999
ATLANTA -- Delta Air Lines Inc., the No. 3 U.S. carrier, yesterday dropped its 3 percent fare increase, raising the possibility that three rivals may roll back the higher prices, an Internet site that tracks fares said.Delta rescinded its increase on business and leisure fares, said Tom Parsons, editor of bestfares.com. The increase remains in place at UAL Corp.'s United Airlines, Continental Airlines Inc. and AMR Corp.'s American, which started the fare boost late Monday to make up for higher fuel costs.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | September 5, 2007
Southwest Airlines Co., the largest discount carrier, led eight of the biggest U.S. airlines in boosting round-trip fares as much as $20 to help offset higher fuel costs. Southwest's tickets rose $1 to $10 each way, depending on distance, on Aug. 31, spokeswoman Beth Harbin said yesterday. American Airlines, United Airlines, Continental Airlines Inc., Northwest Airlines Corp. and US Airways Group Inc. matched the fares over the weekend, spokesmen said. Delta Air Lines Inc. and AirTran Holdings Inc. raised prices to a lesser extent.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 17, 2006
NEW YORK -- Customer service at U.S. airlines during the first quarter was the worst it has been in five years, according to a University of Michigan index that ranks customer satisfaction. Only cable television, satellite services and newspapers ranked lower than airlines in the American Customer Satisfaction Index, which also examined industries such as utilities, health care, telecommunications and food service. Among the U.S. airlines, Northwest ranked lowest, its rating falling 4.7 percent from the first quarter of last year.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff writer | March 8, 1991
Loopholes in a new federal airport noise law could allow airlines toignore a schedule for phasing out noisy, older-model airplanes, community activists and congressional critics say.But the nation's air carriers say the law must be flexible or the cost of compliance will force many financially strapped airlines out of business.The two sides came together this week in Alexandria, Va., when the Federal Aviation Administration held two days of hearings on implementing the law, which was passed by Congress in October over objections from community groups nationwide.
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