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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel | March 3, 2010
Two British men have pleaded guilty to drug possession after landing at BWI-Thurgood Marshall Airport with suitcases full of khat. Officials believe it was the second prosecution in about three years involving the shrub, grown mostly in East Africa and the Arabian Peninsula and prized for its stimulant- and euphoria-producing properties when chewed fresh, brewed in tea or smoked. Agents of U.S. Customs and Border Protection flagged air passengers Peter R. Leahy, 41, and Cimmaron R. Storer, 36, for scrutiny when they landed at BWI Dec. 5 because their airline tickets had been purchased by a third person at the last minute, spokesman Steve Sapp said.
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SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2013
When Orioles season-ticket holders receive their renewal packages in the mail over the next few days, they will find slightly higher average ticket prices and an expanded version of the variable-pricing plan the club has used for single-game ticket sales over the past seven years. The Orioles are raising season-ticket prices on all plans by an average of approximately 5 percent, the first increase in cost since 2008, an Orioles spokeswoman confirmed Friday. Season-ticket packages start at $168 for a 13-game plan; 29-game and full-season packages are also available.
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SPORTS
September 21, 2010
Notre Dame and Navy will play in Dublin, Ireland, in 2012. Navy athletic director Chet Gladchuk says Aviva Stadium will be the site for the 86th meeting between the Fighting Irish and Midshipmen. The $410 million stadium opened in May and has a seating capacity of 50,000. "Obviously as an Irish-Catholic from Boston, Mass., I'm going to have a lot of requests for tickets — not airline tickets," Notre Dame coach Brian Kelly said after Tuesday's practice in South Bend, Ind. "No, I just think it's a great venue and I'm excited about it. That's one of the unique things about being an independent, that you can have a game like that on the schedule.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2011
Some days I feel like a harpy and I guess today's just gonna be one of those days. The FAA is back up and running as of Aug. 8, but the whole dispute has left a bad taste in my mouth. Case in point: Soonafter the deal - OK, 10 days ago and I don't know how I didn't see it sooner - the IRS issued guidance on what would happen to those taxes that the U.S. government was unable to collect during the FAA shutdown. The 7 percent or so in ticket fees that many airlines scooped up as part of fare increases instead of passing along as savings to passengers.
NEWS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | October 8, 2000
The first time that a hotel clerk offered Howard "Stonie" Maxwell a senior citizen discount, he was insulted. "I was really taken aback, because I was 51 and I felt like I was 39," said the Columbia businessman. "It was really an affront. I said, `Do I really look that old?'" But after he thought about the 10 percent savings - about $7 off his hotel bill - it didn't bother him so much. That night 12 years ago was a turning point, one that has allowed Maxwell to save what he estimates has been hundreds of dollars a year ever since, on everything from coffee at fast-food restaurants to movie tickets to merchandise.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2013
When Orioles season-ticket holders receive their renewal packages in the mail over the next few days, they will find slightly higher average ticket prices and an expanded version of the variable-pricing plan the club has used for single-game ticket sales over the past seven years. The Orioles are raising season-ticket prices on all plans by an average of approximately 5 percent, the first increase in cost since 2008, an Orioles spokeswoman confirmed Friday. Season-ticket packages start at $168 for a 13-game plan; 29-game and full-season packages are also available.
BUSINESS
By Stanley Ziemba and Stanley Ziemba,Chicago Tribune | May 3, 1992
The recently stepped-up U.S. Justice Department investigation into possible price-fixing by major airlines has put a spotlight on the four computerized reservation systems owned by U.S. carriers.The systems -- Apollo, SABRE, System One and DATAS II PARS -- apparently are not targets of the federal probe, at least not yet.But the entire lightning-fast process by which most airline reservations are made, and by which all participants in the air travel business are interconnected, is sure to come under close scrutiny as the investigation proceeds.
TRAVEL
By Los Angeles Times | July 15, 2007
It seems as though every ticket I buy -- except plane tickets -- can be transferred to someone else. I understand the airline's need to know who is on a plane, but they must have the ability to change the passenger name on a reservation. Why are plane tickets nontransferable? Ask a simple question; get an answer that's so complicated it takes a professor of economics to explain it. On its face, this seemed like a pretty easy question. Surely, this just had to be a government regulation.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2011
Some days I feel like a harpy and I guess today's just gonna be one of those days. The FAA is back up and running as of Aug. 8, but the whole dispute has left a bad taste in my mouth. Case in point: Soonafter the deal - OK, 10 days ago and I don't know how I didn't see it sooner - the IRS issued guidance on what would happen to those taxes that the U.S. government was unable to collect during the FAA shutdown. The 7 percent or so in ticket fees that many airlines scooped up as part of fare increases instead of passing along as savings to passengers.
BUSINESS
By Tom Belden and Tom Belden,Knight-Ridder | December 24, 1990
On company bulletin boards nationwide, notices like this are proliferating:"The Accounting Department has a non-refundable airline ticketfor travel between Philadelphia and Miami on Jan. 15. Let us know if anyone can use it."The pleas are similar to those found increasingly in newspaper classified ads across the country -- some from ticket brokers, but most from individuals.This is one of 91 such ads that appeared in a recent Washington Post:"AIRLINE TICKETS 2 Roundtrip to Hawaii. Good through Sept.
SPORTS
September 21, 2010
Notre Dame and Navy will play in Dublin, Ireland, in 2012. Navy athletic director Chet Gladchuk says Aviva Stadium will be the site for the 86th meeting between the Fighting Irish and Midshipmen. The $410 million stadium opened in May and has a seating capacity of 50,000. "Obviously as an Irish-Catholic from Boston, Mass., I'm going to have a lot of requests for tickets — not airline tickets," Notre Dame coach Brian Kelly said after Tuesday's practice in South Bend, Ind. "No, I just think it's a great venue and I'm excited about it. That's one of the unique things about being an independent, that you can have a game like that on the schedule.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel | March 3, 2010
Two British men have pleaded guilty to drug possession after landing at BWI-Thurgood Marshall Airport with suitcases full of khat. Officials believe it was the second prosecution in about three years involving the shrub, grown mostly in East Africa and the Arabian Peninsula and prized for its stimulant- and euphoria-producing properties when chewed fresh, brewed in tea or smoked. Agents of U.S. Customs and Border Protection flagged air passengers Peter R. Leahy, 41, and Cimmaron R. Storer, 36, for scrutiny when they landed at BWI Dec. 5 because their airline tickets had been purchased by a third person at the last minute, spokesman Steve Sapp said.
TRAVEL
By Los Angeles Times | November 23, 2008
My husband and I purchased tickets from Los Angeles to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in June. The trip was scheduled for Nov. 4. About a month ago, Bob, our 27-year-old cat, was diagnosed with chronic renal failure. The vet said he had two weeks. I was not about to lose him without a fight, and the next thing you know, he's at least 90 percent of what he used to be. But he requires intensive care. The airline tells me that I have only one year from the date of my ticket purchase to travel. Can anything be done?
TRAVEL
By Catharine Hamm and Catharine Hamm,Los Angeles Times | November 16, 2008
You recently took my daughter to the airport for an 8:50 a.m. flight. Although you did a good job of getting her there - she was an hour early - she missed the flight. Her ticket said US Airways (which is in Terminal 1 at Los Angeles International Airport), but she actually was on a United flight (which is in Terminal 7). It was a code share. How were we supposed to know? Why didn't you know this? What kind of aunt-sister are you? Judith Ramsey, Arnold, Md. Wait a minute. You think just because you're my older sister you can yell at me and boss me around?
TRAVEL
By Los Angeles Times | July 15, 2007
It seems as though every ticket I buy -- except plane tickets -- can be transferred to someone else. I understand the airline's need to know who is on a plane, but they must have the ability to change the passenger name on a reservation. Why are plane tickets nontransferable? Ask a simple question; get an answer that's so complicated it takes a professor of economics to explain it. On its face, this seemed like a pretty easy question. Surely, this just had to be a government regulation.
NEWS
By MAGGIE FARLEY and MAGGIE FARLEY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 3, 2006
UNITED NATIONS -- A three-day AIDS conference set a goal yesterday of doubling spending to slow the spread of the disease, and 14 countries announced an airline ticket tax to fund greater access to AIDS drugs. The special session on HIV/AIDS was marked by political haggling over the mention of condoms, safe drug use and sex education. Delegates agreed to refer to condoms specifically, but language on drug use and sex education is couched in euphemisms. U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan pleaded with the assembled representatives, who included African presidents, foreign ministers from around the world and U.S. first lady Laura Bush, not to let politics derail future progress.
TRAVEL
By Los Angeles Times | November 23, 2008
My husband and I purchased tickets from Los Angeles to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in June. The trip was scheduled for Nov. 4. About a month ago, Bob, our 27-year-old cat, was diagnosed with chronic renal failure. The vet said he had two weeks. I was not about to lose him without a fight, and the next thing you know, he's at least 90 percent of what he used to be. But he requires intensive care. The airline tells me that I have only one year from the date of my ticket purchase to travel. Can anything be done?
NEWS
By MAGGIE FARLEY and MAGGIE FARLEY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 3, 2006
UNITED NATIONS -- A three-day AIDS conference set a goal yesterday of doubling spending to slow the spread of the disease, and 14 countries announced an airline ticket tax to fund greater access to AIDS drugs. The special session on HIV/AIDS was marked by political haggling over the mention of condoms, safe drug use and sex education. Delegates agreed to refer to condoms specifically, but language on drug use and sex education is couched in euphemisms. U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan pleaded with the assembled representatives, who included African presidents, foreign ministers from around the world and U.S. first lady Laura Bush, not to let politics derail future progress.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 20, 2004
WASHINGTON - The meeting had all the hallmarks of an ordinary congressional hearing. There was Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, the Massachusetts Democrat, discussing the problems faced by ordinary citizens mistakenly placed on terrorist watch lists. Then, to the astonishment of the crowd attending a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing yesterday, Kennedy offered himself up as Exhibit A. Between March 1 and April 6, airline agents tried to block Kennedy from boarding airplanes on five occasions because his name resembled an alias used by a suspected terrorist who had been barred from flying on airlines in the United States, his aides and government officials said.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Bill Atkinson and Lorraine Mirabella and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2004
As the price of crude oil approaches record highs, the impact is beginning to flow far beyond the corner gas station. It's slicing through the economy, cutting into corporate profits, raising the cost of food, airline tickets, delivery services and countless other products. The cost of petroleum-based consumer goods -- everything from plastic wrap to Goretex to aspirin, luggage, surfboards and nylon stockings -- is expected to rise. Combined with record gasoline prices at the pumps, the spreading energy inflation means that Americans will have less spending power -- which is likely to dampen the economic recovery, experts say. For every $5 per barrel increase in the price of oil, roughly half a percentage point is shaved from the U.S. gross domestic product, economists say. Currently, that would be about $55 billion a year in lost production.
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