Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAirline Industry
IN THE NEWS

Airline Industry

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | August 4, 1993
The airline industry may be taking off again, thanks to some long-awaited profits and encouragement from the federal government.Those 1993 surprises are fashioning a revival for an embattled industry that suffered a mind-boggling $10 billion in losses in the last three years.The potential for turnaround appears so strong that many Wall Street analysts are talking up the prospects of airline stocks, whose prices nose-dived to inexpensive levels during the preceding debacle."There have been ticket price increases, oil is at a three-year low and domestic seat capacity is declining just as the economy begins to expand," noted Samuel Buttrick, analyst with Kidder, Peabody.
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2013
Southwest Airlines' fliers may be starting to feel fee-bitten. The airline that prides itself on flying in the face of the baggage fee trend has come up with another way to come between you and your wallet. Southwest, the largest carrier at BWI-Marshall Airport, announced this week that it will begin offering passengers the opportunity to be among the first to board the plane – for a fee. Customers can pay $40 per flight at the gate to secure one of the earliest boarding positions in what is known as the 'A' group.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 14, 2005
WASHINGTON - A group of aviation experts drew a picture yesterday of hope and despair for the nation's troubled airline industry. First, the hope: Traditional airlines have significantly reduced their costs to the point that were it not for higher fuel prices, some would be reporting significant profits. And the despair: No one knows whether today's $60-a-barrel oil prices will decline, stay the same or go even higher. "Fuel is a reality," said Jamie Baker, an airline analyst with J.P. Morgan Securities.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2010
Southwest Airlines, the largest carrier at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, announced today that it plans to acquire AirTran Airways. What does this mean for customers and shareholders? Read on: When is this going to happen? AirTran stockholders and federal regulators need to approve the deal — and the airlines say it could take months for both to occur. After the merger closes, Southwest said it could then take as long as two years to integrate the airlines and begin operating as one carrier.
BUSINESS
By Tom Belden and Tom Belden,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 17, 1990
Airline travelers and those who pay their bills have watched with alarm this fall as the Persian Gulf crisis seemed to move steadily toward war.The conflict has sent oil prices up, but prices for jet fuel have soared far more than have gasoline prices. That, in turn, has caused not only higher air fares -- they are up an average of almost 18 percent since summer -- but also a financial crisis for the airline industry, which already was experiencing a drop in business because of the economy.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | August 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Significant tax relief and regulatory reform must occur to help pull the nation's beleaguered airlines out of their financial hole, a federal commission created to study the industry reported yesterday.The 15-member commission, created by President Clinton and Congress to study the plight of the airline and aerospace industries, formally proposed a two-year exemption from the new, 4.3 cent-per-gallon federal fuel tax, along with cuts in other taxes, such as those imposed on passengers and cargo.
BUSINESS
By Mary Rowland and Mary Rowland,New York Times News Service | February 24, 1991
The competition in the airline industry is creating terrific opportunities for people who want to travel now. Even if you don't want to lay out any cash, you can take advantage of the chaos in the industry by using frequent-flier miles you may have accumulated.There are now fewer restrictions on how you use them than at any time in recent years, experts say."Right now everybody is so desperate for business that you can stay anywhere and fly anywhere you want," said Joe Brancatelli, executive editor of Frequent Flyer magazine in New York.
BUSINESS
By AMEET SACHDEV and AMEET SACHDEV,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 10, 2005
In spite of having its planes in the air longer and taking off and landing off more frequently than its competitors, Southwest Airlines has logged one of the best safety records in the industry - in part by flying and maintaining just one model of plane, the Boeing 737. The single-aisle jet is the workhorse of the global airline industry and deemed one of the safest models ever made. While airlines rarely promote their safety records in advertising, the fact that Southwest had not had a fatal accident in its 35-year history until Thursday night - when a Southwest plane skidded off a runway at Chicago's Midway Airport and killed a 6-year-old boy as it crashed into a car on an adjacent street - was a point of pride internally for the Dallas-based carrier.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 13, 1997
ATLANTA -- Delta Air Lines Inc. Chairman and Chief Executive Ronald Allen announced unexpectedly yesterday that he will retire July 31, after clashing with board members over a bid to demote the airline's chief financial officer and leading a failed pursuit of Continental Airlines Inc.A career-long Delta employee, Allen's combative personality put him at odds with his board and made it impossible for him to get support for his vision for the airline.Though...
NEWS
By Paul Adams and Kristine Henry and Paul Adams and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2001
Meetings and events were canceled. Thousands of business travelers were stranded nationwide. Packages that absolutely, positively had to get there overnight, didn't. Despite international resolve not to let Tuesday's terrorist hijackings stand in the way of world commerce, many businesses that rely on commercial aviation to conduct business in Maryland and beyond suffered in ways big and small as the nation's airlines remained largely grounded for a second day yesterday. Even with the resumption of normal air traffic, many analysts predict a sharp decline in air travel that could change the way America does business for weeks or months to come.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,michelle.deal@baltsun.com | April 14, 2009
Southwest Airlines is scheduled to announce plans Tuesday to offer nonstop service from Baltimore to Boston, adding a second major market to its portfolio in little more than a week as it works to build business despite the downturn in travel amid the recession. Beginning Aug. 16, Southwest will schedule 10 flights daily to Boston's Logan International Airport, including five each from BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport and from Chicago. Last week, the air carrier began booking flights to New York's LaGuardia Airport from Baltimore and Chicago.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | June 3, 2008
ISTANBUL, Turkey - Noting high oil prices and the slowing economy, the International Air Transport Association sharply lowered its industry forecast for 2008 yesterday, saying it now expects a collective loss of $2.3 billion. In March, the group had forecast a profit of $4.5 billion. At its annual meeting here, the association urged governments to roll back regulations that they argue are damaging the industry at a time when many carriers are in a "desperate" situation. If the price of oil, now just below $130 a barrel, averages $107 over this year, the aviation industry would lose $2.3 billion for the year, said Giovanni Bisignani, the chief executive of the group.
BUSINESS
By David Lazarus and David Lazarus,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 20, 2008
Airline passengers just can't catch a break. Or can they? Hundreds of thousands of people were forced to scramble for alternative travel arrangements recently after American Airlines, the nation's biggest carrier, canceled more than 3,000 flights for maintenance checks. Meantime, Aloha Airlines, ATA and Skybus shut down operations, leaving passengers high and dry. Charter airline Champion Air said it would shut down in the next few weeks. Amid all this chaos, it was easy to overlook a federal court's ruling last month that overturned a New York law guaranteeing airline passengers a "bill of rights" for when they get stuck on the ground during epic delays.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | April 11, 2008
With her pink cell phone practically glued to her left ear, Renee Matos stood in the Baltimore airport yesterday tapping her foot and praying that the Southwest Airlines agent on the line would come through. They had to get her home to San Antonio that night. American Airlines wasn't in any position to do it. The company grounded more than 900 flights yesterday - on top of the 1,550 since Tuesday - so it could inspect and repair wiring on its planes. And executives said it would cancel about 570 more flights today, with more postponements tomorrow.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | April 4, 2008
When an Indianapolis airline canceled its flights yesterday -- stranding thousands -- and announced that the company had filed for bankruptcy, the effects were felt all the way to Baltimore. ATA was supposed to expand BWI Marshall Airport's international operations by offering inexpensive flights to Europe through a partnership with Southwest Airlines, the airport's No. 1 carrier. The deal would have turned BWI into Southwest's international hub and boosted BWI's languishing foreign travel services.
BUSINESS
By McClatchy-Tribune | November 2, 2007
FORT WORTH, Texas -- Not long after he was hired as lead labor negotiator last year for Southwest Airlines, Joe Harris was pulled aside by Herbert D. Kelleher in a hallway at the company's Dallas headquarters. The airline's chairman and co-founder had one directive regarding negotiations for the airline's new pilots contract. "Herb cornered me and said, `Don't screw this up, Harris,' " he recounted. Not long after, a Southwest pilot recognized him at an airport. The pilot "came up to me and said, `Don't let them screw this up.'" Harris got the message.
BUSINESS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | November 3, 2005
Those who hold bankrupt United Airlines' stock may joke that it's not worth the paper it's printed on. But it's no joke: Wall Street believes the stock is worth about 50 cents. At the same time, the going rate for the paper: $29.95, because unlike wanting a stake in the company, a growing number of people want to buy the paper. Those people are aeroscripophilists. They scour the Internet and tables at traveling fairs for financial papers such as stocks and bonds, specifically those with ties to aviation.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 20, 1990
NEW YORK -- Pan American World Airways Inc. said yesterday that it will eliminate 2,500 jobs, 8.6 percent of its work force, by next month. The layoffs, which include managers and other employees, are the most visible sign yet of the weakening condition of the nation's airline industry.The cuts, which will save Pan Am about $55 million a year, are part of a cost-saving program aimed at softening the double blow of higher fuel costs and slackening demand for air travel. It is the most employees the troubled airline has let go since 1982.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,Sun reporter | April 4, 2007
Northwest Airlines announced yesterday that it will shutter its Hanover reservation center, which employs 183, because of a shortage of qualified workers in the area. The center is slated to close March 31, 2008. "The challenges the airline industry is currently facing require Northwest to continually review its operations," Perry Cantarutti, Northwest's vice president of reservations sales and services, said in a statement. "While this was a very difficult decision to make, it was necessary given the inability to retain and attract sufficient numbers of qualified staff at the ... facility."
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN REPORTER | November 16, 2006
East Coast passengers are likely to see fewer choices and pay higher fares if a US Airways takeover of Delta Air Lines is successful, a move that industry analysts expect will accelerate airline consolidation and further shake up air travel. Discount carriers such as Southwest Airlines are likely to make up some flight losses, but they also face pressure to raise fares to cover higher oil and labor costs. US Airways announced yesterday its $8 billion hostile bid for Delta, which is likely to spark other offers for the airline.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.