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Airline Deregulation

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NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | March 22, 1993
STANDARD and Poors has officially downgraded the bonds of all the major U.S. airlines to junk-bond status. The airlines lost a cool $10 billion in the past three years, despite a reduction in fuel costs, labor costs and interest rates.The Clinton administration will shortly appoint a commission on the future of the airline and aircraft industries, and not a moment too soon. It might begin by reviewing the experiment in airline deregulation.Thanks to deregulation, the industry has evolved into a disastrous blend of collusion and ruinous competition.
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NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | April 22, 2014
Like it or not, a new generation of electric meters is on its way to Harford County. BGE has called the new devices smart meters, a name that appears to have been coined to capitalize on the popularity of smart phones, even as that tactic appears to have backfired in certain circles. At recent county community input meetings, a topic on the minds of a fair number of speakers has been a general disdain for the smart meters. The energy company assures its captive customers they can opt-out of the smart meters program - at least for the time being - but they'll have to pay an upfront fee of $75, plus an additional $11 a month to keep the old meters.
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NEWS
By Tom Belden | October 23, 1998
IF YOU like to take long-distance vacations, President Jimmy Carter signed a piece of legislation 20 years ago this month that changed your life for the better.The Airline Deregulation Act is not only widely regarded as an unqualified success for consumers, but it is also credited with pumping fresh blood into a sluggish airline industry and starting a revolution in the federal regulation of business.But two decades into the journey, there is an overcast on the horizon. A growing group of critics are asking whether America's experiment with deregulation isn't flying off course and poorly serving millions of travelers.
BUSINESS
By ANDREW LECKEY | November 7, 2004
Airline deregulation: Legislation permitting more Americans to fly cheaply, but on bankrupt carriers. Airlines used to make money, and investors bought the stock of a great many of them. Today airline stocks, for the most part, are trading vehicles, with those declaring bankruptcy often becoming total losses for their shareholders. US Airways, ATA Airlines and United Airlines are in bankruptcy, while Delta Air Lines is fighting off bankruptcy. When I visited a Wall Street investment analyst's office years ago, he displayed a long shelf of model planes bearing the insignia of carriers he covered in his work.
BUSINESS
By ANDREW LECKEY | November 7, 2004
Airline deregulation: Legislation permitting more Americans to fly cheaply, but on bankrupt carriers. Airlines used to make money, and investors bought the stock of a great many of them. Today airline stocks, for the most part, are trading vehicles, with those declaring bankruptcy often becoming total losses for their shareholders. US Airways, ATA Airlines and United Airlines are in bankruptcy, while Delta Air Lines is fighting off bankruptcy. When I visited a Wall Street investment analyst's office years ago, he displayed a long shelf of model planes bearing the insignia of carriers he covered in his work.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | June 14, 1994
JUDGE Stephen Breyer, who will likely be confirmed to the Supreme Court next month by a nearly unanimous Senate, is a liberal much loved by economic conservatives. As a lead Senate staffer for Ted Kennedy in the 1970s, Judge Breyer championed economic deregulation. He was the only Carter appointee to the federal bench who Republican senators were willing to confirm after the 1980 election. As a federal appeals judge since 1980, Judge Breyer has been a leading foe of antitrust enforcement.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | April 22, 2014
Like it or not, a new generation of electric meters is on its way to Harford County. BGE has called the new devices smart meters, a name that appears to have been coined to capitalize on the popularity of smart phones, even as that tactic appears to have backfired in certain circles. At recent county community input meetings, a topic on the minds of a fair number of speakers has been a general disdain for the smart meters. The energy company assures its captive customers they can opt-out of the smart meters program - at least for the time being - but they'll have to pay an upfront fee of $75, plus an additional $11 a month to keep the old meters.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | August 23, 1993
THE report of the National Commission to Ensure a Strong Competitive Airline Industry, appointed by the Clinton administration last May, could have been the work of Ronald Reagan. The commission did acknowledge that the airline and aircraft industries are in a tailspin, but offered much wind and little lift.As the commission noted, the airlines have lost $10 billion in the past three years; they are now $35 billion in debt. Meanwhile, the aircraft makers, hit with the treble shocks of declining military contracts, dwindling commercial orders and subsidized foreign competition, have laid off hundreds of thousands of workers.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | July 26, 1993
Washington. -- America's skies are full of fliers saving billions annually because of one of the federal government's rare successes, airline deregulation, begun 15 years ago. Yet many, perhaps most Americans believe deregulation has failed. This suggests that American journalism is not properly serving Americans' understanding of a free economy, or freedom generally.In the 1960s the case for deregulation began to be so obvious that even the federal government noticed it. It became obvious because of American federalism: California was large enough to be Pacific Southwest Airlines' sole market, which meant PSA was not subject to federal regulation.
NEWS
By PAUL STEPHEN DEMPSEY | September 13, 1991
Denver-- I know I am in America, land of the free, when I hear the Fat Lady sing the national anthem off-key, or I savor the benefits of deregulation. Both bring tears to my eyes. Deregulation is as American as motherhood, apple pie, and P.T. Barnum. It is high time for Congress to declare a National Deregulation Day, so that we Americans can come together and celebrate its profound accomplishments.Nothing brought Americans so close as airline deregulation. By jamming seats together in coach and flying us through constipated hub airports, we rub elbows and knees for hours.
NEWS
By Tom Belden | October 23, 1998
IF YOU like to take long-distance vacations, President Jimmy Carter signed a piece of legislation 20 years ago this month that changed your life for the better.The Airline Deregulation Act is not only widely regarded as an unqualified success for consumers, but it is also credited with pumping fresh blood into a sluggish airline industry and starting a revolution in the federal regulation of business.But two decades into the journey, there is an overcast on the horizon. A growing group of critics are asking whether America's experiment with deregulation isn't flying off course and poorly serving millions of travelers.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | June 14, 1994
JUDGE Stephen Breyer, who will likely be confirmed to the Supreme Court next month by a nearly unanimous Senate, is a liberal much loved by economic conservatives. As a lead Senate staffer for Ted Kennedy in the 1970s, Judge Breyer championed economic deregulation. He was the only Carter appointee to the federal bench who Republican senators were willing to confirm after the 1980 election. As a federal appeals judge since 1980, Judge Breyer has been a leading foe of antitrust enforcement.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | August 23, 1993
THE report of the National Commission to Ensure a Strong Competitive Airline Industry, appointed by the Clinton administration last May, could have been the work of Ronald Reagan. The commission did acknowledge that the airline and aircraft industries are in a tailspin, but offered much wind and little lift.As the commission noted, the airlines have lost $10 billion in the past three years; they are now $35 billion in debt. Meanwhile, the aircraft makers, hit with the treble shocks of declining military contracts, dwindling commercial orders and subsidized foreign competition, have laid off hundreds of thousands of workers.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | July 26, 1993
Washington. -- America's skies are full of fliers saving billions annually because of one of the federal government's rare successes, airline deregulation, begun 15 years ago. Yet many, perhaps most Americans believe deregulation has failed. This suggests that American journalism is not properly serving Americans' understanding of a free economy, or freedom generally.In the 1960s the case for deregulation began to be so obvious that even the federal government noticed it. It became obvious because of American federalism: California was large enough to be Pacific Southwest Airlines' sole market, which meant PSA was not subject to federal regulation.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | March 22, 1993
STANDARD and Poors has officially downgraded the bonds of all the major U.S. airlines to junk-bond status. The airlines lost a cool $10 billion in the past three years, despite a reduction in fuel costs, labor costs and interest rates.The Clinton administration will shortly appoint a commission on the future of the airline and aircraft industries, and not a moment too soon. It might begin by reviewing the experiment in airline deregulation.Thanks to deregulation, the industry has evolved into a disastrous blend of collusion and ruinous competition.
NEWS
By Richard C. Leone | September 18, 1992
HERE comes another shaky, debt-laden American airline seeking refuge with a rich European company. Northwest and KLM Royal Dutch Airlines have asked U.S. government permission to form what would, in effect, be a unified global airline. KLM had already bought 49 percent of the stock in Northwest's parent company.Last month, British Airways announced plans to acquire a 44 percent equity stake in USAir for $750 million. Continental and the Scandinavian Airlines System have formed an alliance.
NEWS
By Richard C. Leone | September 18, 1992
HERE comes another shaky, debt-laden American airline seeking refuge with a rich European company. Northwest and KLM Royal Dutch Airlines have asked U.S. government permission to form what would, in effect, be a unified global airline. KLM had already bought 49 percent of the stock in Northwest's parent company.Last month, British Airways announced plans to acquire a 44 percent equity stake in USAir for $750 million. Continental and the Scandinavian Airlines System have formed an alliance.
NEWS
By PAUL STEPHEN DEMPSEY | September 13, 1991
Denver-- I know I am in America, land of the free, when I hear the Fat Lady sing the national anthem off-key, or I savor the benefits of deregulation. Both bring tears to my eyes. Deregulation is as American as motherhood, apple pie, and P.T. Barnum. It is high time for Congress to declare a National Deregulation Day, so that we Americans can come together and celebrate its profound accomplishments.Nothing brought Americans so close as airline deregulation. By jamming seats together in coach and flying us through constipated hub airports, we rub elbows and knees for hours.
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