Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAircraft Parts
IN THE NEWS

Aircraft Parts

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | April 29, 1995
UNC Inc. said it broke even during the first quarter, as cost savings from last summer's sharp restructuring partially offset the continuing impact of much weaker demand for aircraft parts and other UNC products.Annapolis-based UNC makes parts for a wide variety of commercial jetliners. It also remanufactures jet engine and aircraft components, refurbishes helicopters and provides aircraft maintenance and pilot training.UNC said last June that it planned to cut about 300 of its 6,200 jobs, which are spread over 70 locations, as part of a restructuring that would save $15 million in annual operating expenses.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Cox News Service | March 5, 2008
WASHINGTON -- The Federal Aviation Administration lacks an adequate system for checking the quality of commercial airplane parts, creating a potential safety risk for airline passengers, according to a new oversight report. "Neither manufacturers nor FAA inspectors have provided effective oversight of suppliers; this has allowed substandard parts to enter the aviation supply chain," states a 24-page report from the Transportation Department's inspector general. Federal investigators assessed the oversight of suppliers to the nation's major aircraft manufacturers - Boeing Co., Bombardier Aerospace/Learjet Inc., General Electric Aircraft Engines, Rolls-Royce PLC, Pratt & Whitney and Airbus SAS. They found "widespread deficiencies" at all but one of 21 suppliers who make parts for those companies.
Advertisement
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | January 7, 1996
MIAMI -- Comforting news for airplane passengers: Federal authorities have shut down a half-dozen aircraft parts purveyors accused of selling potentially defective equipment -- including landing brakes and navigation computers -- to unwitting passenger and cargo airlines.The discomforting angle: After busting unscrupulous parts suppliers Friday, investigators have no way of pinpointing aircraft flying with equipment that could fail. They say that all they do is issue warning bulletins to the airline industry and hope mechanics detect defective parts.
NEWS
By Melanie Lefkowitz and Melanie Lefkowitz,Newsday | October 12, 2006
NEW YORK -- A single-engine airplane owned by New York Yankees pitcher Cory Lidle sputtered out of the hazy skies and slammed into the side of an exclusive Manhattan apartment tower yesterday, killing Lidle and a flight instructor but miraculously leaving no one in the building seriously hurt. The fiery crash 30 floors above the street sent panicked residents and passers-by running as smoke, fire and aircraft parts rained down to the street. It evoked still-fresh flashbacks to Sept. 11, 2001, and sparked fears of terrorism across the city.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2005
An Iranian man pleaded guilty in Baltimore federal court yesterday to trying to buy highly sensitive American military aircraft parts and attempting to smuggle the restricted equipment back to his home country. The investigation leading to the plea spanned three continents and marked the second time in two years that a Maryland undercover operation exposed suspected illegal arms dealers accused of working for Iran. "Our area is ripe for it because there are about 800 defense contractors just in Northern Virginia, D.C. and Maryland," said Cynthia J. O'Connell, special agent in charge of the Immigration and Customs Enforcement office in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Melanie Lefkowitz and Melanie Lefkowitz,Newsday | October 12, 2006
NEW YORK -- A single-engine airplane owned by New York Yankees pitcher Cory Lidle sputtered out of the hazy skies and slammed into the side of an exclusive Manhattan apartment tower yesterday, killing Lidle and a flight instructor but miraculously leaving no one in the building seriously hurt. The fiery crash 30 floors above the street sent panicked residents and passers-by running as smoke, fire and aircraft parts rained down to the street. It evoked still-fresh flashbacks to Sept. 11, 2001, and sparked fears of terrorism across the city.
BUSINESS
By Cox News Service | March 5, 2008
WASHINGTON -- The Federal Aviation Administration lacks an adequate system for checking the quality of commercial airplane parts, creating a potential safety risk for airline passengers, according to a new oversight report. "Neither manufacturers nor FAA inspectors have provided effective oversight of suppliers; this has allowed substandard parts to enter the aviation supply chain," states a 24-page report from the Transportation Department's inspector general. Federal investigators assessed the oversight of suppliers to the nation's major aircraft manufacturers - Boeing Co., Bombardier Aerospace/Learjet Inc., General Electric Aircraft Engines, Rolls-Royce PLC, Pratt & Whitney and Airbus SAS. They found "widespread deficiencies" at all but one of 21 suppliers who make parts for those companies.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | April 18, 1997
An article that appeared Friday in the Carroll County edition incorrectly stated that a small plane that crashed in Eldersburg in 1995 was trying to land at Wolf Airport. Witnesses said the pilot did not appear to be attempting a landing.The Sun regrets the error.The brother of a Hampstead woman who died from injuries suffered in a plane crash in Eldersburg two years ago claims that the aircraft's defective carburetor was responsible for the accident that killed four, according to a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | April 18, 1997
An article that appeared Friday in the Carroll County edition incorrectly stated that a small plane that crashed in Eldersburg in 1995 was trying to land at Wolf Airport. Witnesses said the pilot did not appear to be attempting a landing.The Sun regrets the error.The brother of a Hampstead woman who died from injuries suffered in a plane crash in Eldersburg two years ago claims that the aircraft's defective carburetor was responsible for the accident that killed four, according to a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | July 17, 1997
Strong sales of aircraft parts overcame a slump in electronics to boost Northrop Grumman Corp.'s second-quarter net income by 16 percent over the same portion of 1996, the company said yesterday.The net income of $100 million bettered the $86 million posted during that period last year even though overall sales were down 3 percent, to $2.09 billion from $2.14 billion in 1996.The recent quarter benefited from a $10 million reduction in deferred state income taxes related to Northrop's acquisition of Grumman in 1994; but, by the same token, last year's second quarter got a lift from a $12 million pretax gain from a stock sale.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2005
An Iranian man pleaded guilty in Baltimore federal court yesterday to trying to buy highly sensitive American military aircraft parts and attempting to smuggle the restricted equipment back to his home country. The investigation leading to the plea spanned three continents and marked the second time in two years that a Maryland undercover operation exposed suspected illegal arms dealers accused of working for Iran. "Our area is ripe for it because there are about 800 defense contractors just in Northern Virginia, D.C. and Maryland," said Cynthia J. O'Connell, special agent in charge of the Immigration and Customs Enforcement office in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2004
About 340 manufacturing employees at Middle River Aircraft Systems are set to strike Thursday barring an agreement with management on a new four-year contract. Members of United Auto Workers Local 738 narrowly rejected the company's contract offer Oct. 30, starting a 10-day cooling-off period before employees could walk off the job. The vote was 135-132 against the proposed pact, which includes increases in health care costs and changes in disability benefits for injured and sick workers.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 17, 2001
WASHINGTON - Two dozen U.S. and British warplanes struck radar and communication sites south of Baghdad yesterday, Pentagon officials said, in the largest allied attack on Iraq in three years and the first military action of the Bush presidency. About 20 targets were hit in five areas inside and outside a "no-fly" zone in southern Iraq that was set up after the 1991 Persian Gulf war. Officials called the attacks a "self-defense" measure. Since the beginning of the year, Iraq has turned its radar, artillery fire and missiles against allied planes with greater regularity, said officials, and military commanders decided it was time to act. The raid was the first outside the southern no-fly zone since December 1998, when U.S. and British planes hit targets in Iraq during the Desert Fox campaign.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | July 17, 1997
Strong sales of aircraft parts overcame a slump in electronics to boost Northrop Grumman Corp.'s second-quarter net income by 16 percent over the same portion of 1996, the company said yesterday.The net income of $100 million bettered the $86 million posted during that period last year even though overall sales were down 3 percent, to $2.09 billion from $2.14 billion in 1996.The recent quarter benefited from a $10 million reduction in deferred state income taxes related to Northrop's acquisition of Grumman in 1994; but, by the same token, last year's second quarter got a lift from a $12 million pretax gain from a stock sale.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | April 18, 1997
An article that appeared Friday in the Carroll County edition incorrectly stated that a small plane that crashed in Eldersburg in 1995 was trying to land at Wolf Airport. Witnesses said the pilot did not appear to be attempting a landing.The Sun regrets the error.The brother of a Hampstead woman who died from injuries suffered in a plane crash in Eldersburg two years ago, claims that the aircraft's defective carburetor was responsible for the accident that killed four, according to a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | April 18, 1997
An article that appeared Friday in the Carroll County edition incorrectly stated that a small plane that crashed in Eldersburg in 1995 was trying to land at Wolf Airport. Witnesses said the pilot did not appear to be attempting a landing.The Sun regrets the error.The brother of a Hampstead woman who died from injuries suffered in a plane crash in Eldersburg two years ago claims that the aircraft's defective carburetor was responsible for the accident that killed four, according to a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2004
About 340 manufacturing employees at Middle River Aircraft Systems are set to strike Thursday barring an agreement with management on a new four-year contract. Members of United Auto Workers Local 738 narrowly rejected the company's contract offer Oct. 30, starting a 10-day cooling-off period before employees could walk off the job. The vote was 135-132 against the proposed pact, which includes increases in health care costs and changes in disability benefits for injured and sick workers.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | April 18, 1997
An article that appeared Friday in the Carroll County edition incorrectly stated that a small plane that crashed in Eldersburg in 1995 was trying to land at Wolf Airport. Witnesses said the pilot did not appear to be attempting a landing.The Sun regrets the error.The brother of a Hampstead woman who died from injuries suffered in a plane crash in Eldersburg two years ago, claims that the aircraft's defective carburetor was responsible for the accident that killed four, according to a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | April 18, 1997
An article that appeared Friday in the Carroll County edition incorrectly stated that a small plane that crashed in Eldersburg in 1995 was trying to land at Wolf Airport. Witnesses said the pilot did not appear to be attempting a landing.The Sun regrets the error.The brother of a Hampstead woman who died from injuries suffered in a plane crash in Eldersburg two years ago, claims that the aircraft's defective carburetor was responsible for the accident that killed four, according to a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | April 18, 1997
An article that appeared Friday in the Carroll County edition incorrectly stated that a small plane that crashed in Eldersburg in 1995 was trying to land at Wolf Airport. Witnesses said the pilot did not appear to be attempting a landing.The Sun regrets the error.The brother of a Hampstead woman who died from injuries suffered in a plane crash in Eldersburg two years ago claims that the aircraft's defective carburetor was responsible for the accident that killed four, according to a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.