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NEWS
By John M. McClintock and John M. McClintock,Mexico City Bureau Contributing writer Berta Thayer assisted with this article | April 2, 1992
MEXICO CITY -- In what may be a major naval breakthrough for the drug cartels, a commuter pilot in Panama claims three South American hijackers forced him to land on a makeshift aircraft carrier March 12.Armando Mallorga says the hijackers ordered him to fly them 200 miles out over the Caribbean, where he landed on the carrier -- a strange Jules Verne concoction with a flight deck of twin steel ramps.After shaking his hand and refueling the plane, Mr. Mallorga says, the crew permitted him to fly back to Panama and dubious fame.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
The Navy identified the pilot Monday who went missing last week after a crash over the Pacific Ocean as Lt. Nathan Poloski, a 2009 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy. Poloski, 26, of Lake Arrowhead, Calif., is presumed dead, officials said. "Nathan was an outstanding person, naval officer and aviator," Navy Cmdr. Michael Langbehn, the commanding officer of Poloski's squadron, said in a statement. "My personal thoughts and prayers are for his family, friends and shipmates as they endure this immeasurable loss.
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NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 16, 1998
THIS CHRISTMAS, a group of North Carroll Middle School students is sending a touch of home to all 6,000 crew members of the USS Enterprise, an aircraft carrier that left Nov. 6 for six months in the Persian Gulf.For 130 of the service men and women, that homestyle touch included gift packages and goody bags of candy and snacks.It's part of a year-long project of corresponding with 130 of the Navy personnel to share ideas and learn about geography, current events and commitment.Of Team 7, or about one-third of the eighth grade at North Carroll and their teachers, 124 are voluntarily participating in the project, donating their study period to compose letters and design fund-raisers.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
Vice Adm. Walter E. "Ted" Carter Jr. will formally relieve Vice Adm. Michael H. Miller as superintendent of the Naval Academy during a change-of-command ceremony scheduled July 23, academy officials said Thursday. Carter, who until this month was head of the Naval War College in Newport, R.I., is a 1981 graduate of the academy and a record-setting naval aviator. The Rhode Island native holds the Navy's record for carrier-assisted landings with 2,016, according to his official biography.
NEWS
By Tony Perry and Tony Perry,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 13, 2003
SAN DIEGO - After 41 years, 21 overseas deployments and eight combat tours, the aircraft carrier Constellation left San Diego Bay yesterday for the final time for a long, slow journey into retirement. For sailors who had served aboard the giant ship known as "Connie," it was a sorrowful occasion. "Connie is my girl," said Chief Petty Officer Efren Ponce, one of a group of sailors who sang "Anchors Aweigh" as the ship departed. "She's where I learned how to be a sailor. I'll miss her." Tugboats pushed the 1,069-foot-long, 80,000-ton ship away from the dock at North Island Naval Air Station.
NEWS
By David Foster and David Foster,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | November 22, 1999
After six years of organizing, a Baltimore group is set to take on Tampa, Fla., in an effort to land the retired aircraft carrier USS Forrestal as a museum in the city's Inner Harbor.Chaired by former crewman Frank J. Eurice of Abingdon, the USS Forrestal Museum Inc. will submit its bid to the Navy Sea Systems Command in Washington on Wednesday, the final day of the submission period."Our clock would start at that point, for anyone else to get in," Eurice said. Under the Navy's Ship Donation Program, once a party submits an application, others have six months to file competing bids.
NEWS
By Fred Tannenbaum and Tom Fredrickson and Fred Tannenbaum and Tom Fredrickson,KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 9, 2000
NEWPORT NEWS, Va. - The motion alarms on Newport News Shipbuilding's huge gantry crane began blaring their familiar "BEE-OOOH, BEE-OOOH" warning as it set about another chore. Dangling from the crane's tentacles of thick steel cables was another piece of the shipyard's 29th aircraft carrier, the Ronald Reagan, named for the former president. It was a preassembled rectangular section of the flight deck, with a V-shaped channel called a "cat trough." The German-made gantry, fittingly called Goliath and one of the world's largest, gingerly carried the section to another part where helmeted workers waited to apply finishing touches before it was to be added to the ship.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | December 24, 1997
The eighth-graders in Team 7 at North Carroll Middle School aren't getting graded on most of the work they do tracking the course of the USS Nimitz and corresponding through e-mail and regular mail with their "crew pals" on the aircraft carrier as it monitors the Persian Gulf.And that might be why they love it so much."It's fun learning this way," said Tracey Redmond, 13, of Hampstead. "This [project] has people you can talk to and understand it better."And it has improved their grades, said she and classmate Jessica Robertson.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 18, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The Senate Armed Services Committee will review the Pentagon's decision to keep intact the promotion of a Navy officer who commanded an aircraft carrier that was blamed for a 1996 collision that caused $10 million damage.Committee staff members asked the Navy Department late last week for its reports on the incident involving the carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt and the cruiser USS Leyte Gulf.The staff members also asked the Navy Department to explain why it chose to retain Rear Adm. Ronald L. Christenson at his current rank, said a spokesman.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 23, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Navy has reassigned the first female pilot qualified to fly combat missions from an aircraft carrier because she had problems landing on the ship, Navy officials confirmed yesterday.Lt. Shannon Workman, 28, of Cumberland, Md., has returned to a Navy command in Norfolk, Va., from her assignment as an EA-6B pilot aboard the aircraft carrier Eisenhower in the Adriatic Sea because of performance problems, Cmdr. Stephen Pietropaoli, a Navy spokesman, said.Navy officials were quick to point out that a male pilot in the same EA-6B squadron, Lt. Gerald DiLeonardo, was ordered off the ship for the same reason.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2014
Did it seem like Patrick (Jonathan Groff) could experience anything more uncomfortable than last episode's failed hook-up with Richie? No? Well... "Looking At Your Browser History" gets off to a cringe-worthy start, with Patrick and work buddy Owen far more drunk at a work party than anyone should be. It's a shindig to commemorate the celebration of the video game Patrick has been designing, and it's held aboard an aircraft carrier. Which means tired material about seamen that probably would have been better left to that fleet week episode of "Sex and the City.
NEWS
May 2, 2012
There has been a lot of discussion about President Obama's highlighting or even bragging about the raid that killed Osama bin Laden and its results ("Bin Laden volatile campaign subject," May 1). Much of this discussion has been criticism by Republicans, proving once again that the one area where Republicans are remarkably consistent is in their hypocrisy. They don't seem to remember cheering for a certain former president strutting about in a flight suit on the deck of an aircraft carrier celebrating "Mission Accomplished!"
EXPLORE
January 3, 2012
The first days of the new year are more than a time to look forward, to resolve to do better. They also provide an opportunity to look back and remember what has been lost. Each week, readers of the Times have an opportunity to do that by checking out "Pages from the Past," a compilation of articles and news of 50, 75 and 100 years ago taken from the pages of the newspaper that eventually became the Catonsville Times. On Page 7 of this week's issue is a short mention of a young man from Catonsville who, like many young men and women today, as well as in years past, was home from college for the holidays.
SPORTS
Baltimore Sun staff report | December 10, 2011
Whether it's playing pickup basketball games at the White House, watching college basketball on an aircraft carrier or seeing his brother-in-law's Oregon State Beavers take on Towson University, it's clear President Obama loves sports. It was even more impressive the way he jumped out of his seat and helped honor the Towson football team at halftime of the game. The pictures were great. It probably drove the Secret Service guys crazy. More than a few earpieces were squawking when he did that.
FEATURES
By Nancy Jones Bonbrest, Special to the Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2011
In an effort to honor those who lost their lives during the attacks of Sept. 11, U.S. Naval Academy midshipmen will take part today in the second annual Project Green: 9/11 Day of Service & Remembrance. The event is organized by the Volunteer Center for Anne Arundel County as a way to honor the victims of the attacks as well as the Marylanders who have died in service to the country. It's also a way to give back by cleaning up the shoreline at Jonas Green Park in Annapolis. As many as 50 midshipmen are expected at the event, which begins at noon with an opening ceremony at the Maryland World War II Memorial on Ritchie Highway overlooking Jonas Green Park.
EXPLORE
June 15, 2011
It was with tears in my eyes that I read the touching article in last week's Towson Times, "Heroes past and present honored at Dulaney Valley" (June 1, 2011). My 90-year-old sailor's mind flashed back to my tour of duty (1943-45, U.S. Naval Reserve officer) aboard the aircraft carrier the USS Enterprise in the Pacific, where we were involved in 13 major engagements as we moved westward, recapturing the islands and naval bases. During the course of battle, enemy planes naturally attacked the carriers first in order to hopefully gain an advantage.
NEWS
July 16, 1993
A good ship if there ever was one, the U.S.S. Coral Sea recently was tugged up the Chesapeake Bay to be scrapped here in Baltimore by Kurt Iron and Metal.The huge aircraft carrier was authorized during World War II, joined the active fleet in 1950 and saw action in Vietnam, where its planes flew the first and last sorties of that conflict. It also took part in many other missions.It was named for one of the most epic naval battles ever fought. Here is Martin Gilbert's thumbnail account of the Battle of the Coral Sea:"On May 2 [1942]
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2004
In a ceremony recalling the sacrifices of Cold War intelligence gathering, top National Security Agency officials yesterday honored the seven crew members killed when their Navy surveillance aircraft crashed while landing on an aircraft carrier in the Mediterranean Sea in 1987. As sunlight broke through heavy morning clouds, several hundred people gathered for the dedication of a Navy EA-3B Skywarrior electronic spy plane placed in NSA's National Vigilance Park, which honors the more than 180 Americans who have died on duty collecting intelligence from the air. A short walk from the eavesdropping and code-breaking agency's glass towers at Fort Meade, the park was created in 1997 to honor the sacrifices of those who flew secret missions along the borders of the Soviet Union and other hostile countries.
EXPLORE
June 14, 2011
Regarding the story in the June 8 edition of the Towson Times ("Pet licensing fees take a bigger bite"), I have no objection to the increase in fees for pet licensing. It's probably long overdue, and the joy that pets bring is much more than worth the licensing costs. My problem, this year, has to do with an inequity in the fee schedule. My husband and I are both in our early 70s, and have two, 2-year-old cocker spaniels. When you look at the fee schedule, you see that owners younger than 60 with an unaltered pet are to pay $15. Owners older than 60 will pay $9. OK so far. Now comes the problem.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2011
Charles Pavlos, a retired Baltimore businessman and former owner of the Jeppi Nut & Candy Co., died Jan. 27 of kidney failure at St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 89. The son of Greek immigrants, Mr. Pavlos was born in Richmond, Va. He spent his early years in Miami until moving to Baltimore at the beginning of the Depression with his family, who settled in Hamilton. After graduating in 1939 from City College, he went to work at the old Glenn L. Martin Co. plant in Middle River, where he was eventually promoted to supervisor.
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