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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2012
Description : NASA's Hurricane Severe Storm Sentinel Mission, also known as HS3, is exploring the massive tropical systems from high altitudes via two unmanned Global Hawk aircraft. Instruments on board the planes will collect data researchers and meteorologists plan to use to better understand how tropical storms and hurricanes form and strengthen. Researchers : Scott A. Braun, a research meteorologist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, is the mission's principal investigator.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
As a tropical cyclone churned the Atlantic Ocean this month, a drone watched from above, dropping a paper-towel-roll-sized set of sensors attached to a parachute through the clouds on a 20-minute, 10-mile journey. The instruments revealed dry air low in the storm's center - something scientists from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center suspect was the nascent eye of Hurricane Edouard. The storm went on to become the Atlantic's first to reach winds of more than 110 mph since Sandy in 2012, though it never threatened the United States.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
The Maryland Air National Guard is set to lose its attack aircraft but should be getting its airlift capability back, officials said Tuesday. The Air Force is planning to give the state eight C-130J Super Hercules turboprops, the cargo planes that Maryland pilots used to transport troops and equipment in Iraq, Afghanistan and natural disasters in the United States until 2011. The planes are due to arrive in fiscal year 2018, when the guard is set to lose its A-10 Thunderbolt II attack aircraft.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
Many of the airplanes overhead in the Baltimore region could start looking a bit different soon, as Southwest Airlines unveiled a new logo and design for its aircraft Monday. The Dallas-based airline is the largest carrier in and out of BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport in Anne Arundel County, operating more than 70 percent of the flights along with subsidiary AirTran. The new red, yellow and blue logo is in the shape of a heart, meant to convey the people-first ethos long espoused publicly by the airline, it said.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby | April 11, 1991
The Department of Defense is rethinking its recent decision to cancel a new electronic system for identifying military aircraft that was being developed by the Towson-based Bendix Communications Division of Allied-Signal Inc., two members of Maryland's congressional delegation said yesterday.At the urging of Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, D-Md., and Representative Helen Delich Bentley, R-Md.-2nd, the DOD has asked Gen. Colin L. Powell, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, to re-examine the need for a system that would include identification of ground vehicles as well as aircraft.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Sun Staff Writer | April 22, 1994
A Carroll County government lapse may jeopardize or delay a new aircraft manufacturer's plans to open a plant here.County officials are scrambling to find another location for Freewing Aircraft Corp. after learning in the past two weeks that the proposed site will conflict with needed landing space at the county airport.Freewing was scheduled to lease a 20,000-square-foot manufacturing plant that the county planned to build on a 3-acre county-owned lot in the Air Business Center along Route 97 north of Westminster.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | March 27, 1994
Freewing Aircraft, a Westminster experimental aircraft manufacturer, is one of three recipients of $5,000 "Excellence in Design" awards from a national engineering magazine.Hugh Schmittle, Freewing's president, was honored by Design News for the company's "freewing" concept, a wing that flexes with turbulent air to allow a smoother and safer flight. Traditional aircraft use fixed wings, which must be adjusted by the pilot and which force planes to move up and down in turbulence.Mr. Schmittle and his partner, Odile Legeay, are using the concept on small, two-seater aircraft and unmanned drones suitable for military reconnaissance.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 21, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A prototype of the V-22 Osprey, a tilt-rotor aircraft whose future was already the subject of furious debate, crashed yesterday in the Potomac River with seven people on board. Pentagon officials said no survivors had been found.The aircraft, which takes off like a helicopter and flies like a plane, was headed for a landing at the Marine Corps air station in Quantico, Va.The aircraft was developed by a partnership of Bell Helicopter Textron and the helicopter division of Boeing Co. Pentagon officials and spokesmen for the two companies said they did not know the cause of the crash, but would investigate.
NEWS
October 1, 2003
A. Frederick Romoser, a retired aircraft draftsman, died of stroke complications and kidney failure Sept. 24 at Lorien Columbia Nursing and Rehabilitation Center. The former Northeast Baltimore resident was 88. Born in Baltimore and raised in the Walbrook area, he was a graduate of Polytechnic Institute. Just before the start of World War II, he became a draftsman and technician at the former Glenn L. Martin Co. aircraft plant in Middle River. He later worked on the Gemini and Apollo programs for what became Martin Marietta.
NEWS
November 9, 2003
Theodore F. Elliott Sr., 85, aircraft training director Theodore Franklin Elliott Sr., a retired aircraft training director who later owned a tavern, died Tuesday of kidney failure at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. The Salisbury resident was 85. Born in Baltimore and raised in Highlandtown, he attended City College before becoming an accountant for a Pulaski Highway oil company. After serving in the Army Air Forces during World War II, he joined the Glenn L. Martin Co. in Middle River, where he became director of training before his 1969 retirement.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2014
William A. Hubbard, a retired chemical engineer who headed a Baltimore business that created the orange-colored coatings for Howard Johnson restaurant roofs, died of heart failure Monday at his Towson home. He was 92. Born in Rolla, Mo., he was the son of Noel Hubbard, a University of Missouri registrar, and Ruth Johns Hubbard, a syndicated newspaper artist and journalist. He earned a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering from the University of Missouri in 1944, where he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Tau Beta Pi. Family members said he tried to enlist in the military during World War II but was turned down.
NEWS
By Alexander E. Hooke | March 21, 2014
Prepared for the next invasion? It will not be led by foreign terrorists or illegal immigrants. This invasion will come in the form of drones - an American specialty. A judge has just ruled that the Federal Aviation Agency cannot ban from public airspace flying robots or pilotless air vehicles owned by commercial enterprises. This decision means drones will no longer be used primarily for war or border patrols. They will soon become part of everyday life. Advocates anticipate a veritable panacea.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
The Maryland Air National Guard is set to lose its attack aircraft but should be getting its airlift capability back, officials said Tuesday. The Air Force is planning to give the state eight C-130J Super Hercules turboprops, the cargo planes that Maryland pilots used to transport troops and equipment in Iraq, Afghanistan and natural disasters in the United States until 2011. The planes are due to arrive in fiscal year 2018, when the guard is set to lose its A-10 Thunderbolt II attack aircraft.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
At least one local business is planning to fly drones over Baltimore after a judge ruled that there is no law prohibiting the commercial use of small unmanned aircraft. Terry Kilby, who with his wife, Belinda, published a book last year of aerial photographs of the city taken by unmanned aircraft, said Friday that they would launch their "rent-a-drone" operation next week. "It's really a great day for all of us that are in this industry," he said. "We've seen lots of companies go bankrupt waiting for this to happen, and it's a nice relief now to see this.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
When Airman Steven Doty was the first to rush to the scene of a downed helicopter in the Nuristan province of Afghanistan, he didn't consider the possibility that he might have been putting his own life in jeopardy. On May 3, 2010, a Russian aircraft bringing supplies to Kalagush, a military base that had been the target of several attacks, dropped suddenly to the ground as a result of mechanical failures. Doty, who worked at the base, leaped into action after observing the crash on a monitor at the base's joint operations command center.
NEWS
By W.J. Hennigan, Tribune Newspapers | November 20, 2013
The A-10 Thunderbolt II, a snub-nosed ground-attack plane that the Maryland Air National Guard has flown in Iraq and Afghanistan, is the latest aircraft to find its way onto the Pentagon's endangered weapons list. Outfitted with a seven-barrel Gatling gun the size of a Volkswagen Beetle in its nose, the Cold War-era plane has a reputation for tearing apart armored tanks and clearing the way for troops on the ground with its massive 30-millimeter rounds of ammunition. But the unsightly plane - it's nicknamed the Warthog - has been in the cross hairs of Pentagon officials in recent years.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1999
William Raymond Benton, a retired aircraft engineer whose model of the moon was displayed for several years at the Goddard Space Center, died Wednesday of pneumonia at Maryland General Hospital. He was 79 and lived in Woodlawn. Fascinated by aircraft and the heavens as a young man, he continued his interest throughout his career as a structural test engineer and an electromechanical engineer at several major aircraft companies in Maryland. An internationally recognized authority on selenology -- the study of the moon -- he spent hours in the basement of his Valley Road home sculpting a 3-foot plaster model of the moon.
BUSINESS
By Tom Belden and Tom Belden,Knight-Ridder | March 18, 1991
A decade from now, business travelers may be routinely flying in aircraft that take off as helicopters do and then tilt their rotors or wings forward to fly as airplanes.The best-known of the new aircraft is the V-22 Osprey, which has a large tilting rotor on the end of each wing. Two military contractors, Boeing Helicopters of Ridley Township, Pa., and Bell Helicopter/Textron of Fort Worth, Texas, are test-flying prototype copies of the Osprey for the Marine Corps.In addition, a small Japanese-owned company, Ishida Aerospace Research Inc., has set up shop in Fort Worth and says it will have a 14-passenger craft with a tilting wing ready for regular commercial airline or air-taxi service by 1997.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
Though it has only been gone a few weeks, the Navy blimp will once again make its return to the Baltimore skies. The 178-foot airship, which is owned by the government and primarily used for research, will continue a mission to test aerial mapping sensors for the Army starting Nov. 12. The trek will begin in Beltsville and later continue to the Baltimore region, although a spokesman for the Naval Research Laboratory couldn't say exactly when the...
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley has joined two frequent ideological sparring partners to support a collaboration of public universities from their three states to conduct testing of unmanned aircraft systems. The Maryland Democrat signed a joint letter with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and Virginia Gov. Bob  McDonnell, both Republicans, endorsing an agreement by the schools to become partners on the Federal Aviation Administration's Unmanned Aircraft System test site. The University of Maryland System, Rutgers University and Virginia Tech have submitted a joint bid to operate one of six sites the FAA will choose to to test the use of unmanned aircraft -- often called drones -- in domestic airspace.
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