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By Robert Kuttner | March 2, 1993
LAST week, speaking at Boeing's big Seattle plant, President Clinton accused the European Community of unfairly subsidizing the arch-rival Airbus. The message, aimed at the 28,000 Boeing workers slotted for layoff due to declining orders, apparently signals a harder line on trade.But while the United States indeed should seek the elusive "level playing field," and while Boeing's plight is serious, Airbus is the wrong target. Both the United States and the Europeans have committed comparable subsidies to aircraft.
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NEWS
By Hugo Martin, Tribune Newspapers | November 22, 2013
If indulging in Thanksgiving's excesses of food and drink has ever made you fret about fitting into the plane seat for the return trip home, a British company wants to put you at ease. Design company Seymourpowell believes it has solved the common problem that comes up when extra-stout passengers try to squeeze into a seat made for an average flier. The answer is a seat called Morph, which can be widened or reduced in width, depending on the space the passengers need. Here's how it works: A row of three seats are built as one, like a sofa, with armrest dividers that can be moved laterally to increase the width of one or two seats while reducing the space of the other.
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NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | September 30, 1991
Renton, Washington. -- Americans who look skyward, or around airports here and abroad, see many products from this Seattle suburb, home of Boeing's commercial-aircraft division. But Boeing's competitive position is under sustained attack by illegal subsidies given by governments to Airbus, Boeing's European competitor.So the Bush administration faces a high-stakes test of its willingness, and ability, to insist effectively on equitable trading practices from the ''mixed'' economies of our major trading partners.
NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | November 28, 2008
4 Afghans die in blast outside U.S. Embassy KABUL, Afghanistan: A suicide car bomb targeting a convoy of foreign troops exploded about 200 yards outside the U.S. Embassy in Kabul yesterday, killing at least four Afghan bystanders as people entered the compound for a Thanksgiving Day race. At least 18 others were wounded in the morning attack, said Abdullah Fahim, a Health Ministry spokesman. Police officer Abdul Manan said the explosion was set off by a suicide bomber in a Toyota Corolla.
BUSINESS
By Steven Greenhouse and Steven Greenhouse,New York Times News Service | June 18, 1991
PARIS -- Airbus Industrie plans to announce this week that Federal Express Corp., the express airfreight carrier, will order up to 75 new cargo planes from Airbus in a $6 billion deal, officials from the European aircraft consortium said.The deal, which is set to be announced at the Paris Air Show, will be one of Airbus' biggest successes in the American market, which has long been dominated by Boeing Co. and McDonnell Douglas Corp. The order also will be the consortium's largest ever for cargo aircraft.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | June 17, 1991
PARIS -- Airbus Industrie plans to announce this week that Federal Express Corp., the express airfreight carrier, will order up to 75 new cargo planes from Airbus in a $6 billion deal, officials from the European aircraft consortium said.The deal, which is set to be announced at the Paris Air Show, will be one of Airbus' biggest successes in the U.S. market, which has long been dominated by Boeing and McDonnell Douglas. The order will also be the consortium's largest for cargo aircraft.In winning the Federal Express order, Airbus has bested an offer DTC from the McDonnell Douglas Corp.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 10, 1998
ST. LOUIS -- Trans World Airlines Inc. split an estimated $3.9 billion order for short-range jets between Boeing Co. and Airbus Industrie, stretching the resources of a carrier that hasn't made an annual profit since 1988.The St. Louis-based airline announced yesterday that it ordered 50 Boeing 717s valued at about $1.4 billion, with options for 50 more.It also ordered 75 Airbus planes, including 50 A318s and 25 from the A320 family, with options for 75 others. TWA would not discuss financing terms except to say it would lease, not own, the planes.
TRAVEL
By MARY ANN ANDERSON and MARY ANN ANDERSON,MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE | August 13, 2006
Elvis has not yet left the building. But when he does, our way of thinking about the world of aviation will change as we're propelled even further into the 21st century. Elvis is the nickname I've given to the new Airbus 380, the world's largest, first-ever fully double-decker passenger plane now being built at Airbus' factory in the quiet countryside of Toulouse, France. As Elvis was known as the "King of Rock 'N' Roll," the A380 will indisputably be crowned the "King of Aviation" when it rolls off the assembly line later this year and is readied for passenger service.
BUSINESS
By Peter Pae and Peter Pae,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 11, 2008
In a high-stakes rivalry pitting two of the world's largest defense contractors, Northrop Grumman Corp. gambled and won. The word came down Feb. 29 from the U.S. Air Force that a contract worth up to $40 billion for aerial refueling tankers would go to Northrop and its partner, Airbus, a unit of Netherlands-based European Aeronautic Defence and Space Co. Shut out was rival Boeing Co., which thought it had a winner. It was a decision likened to last month's stunning Super Bowl loss by the heavily favored New England Patriots, with the favorite losing a cliffhanger.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | November 8, 2006
NEW YORK -- FedEx Corp. scrapped an order for 10 Airbus A380s yesterday and switched to Boeing Co. 777s, the first cancellation as a result of repeated production delays on the world's largest commercial jet. With the A380 program already struggling, "this could potentially be the domino that knocks the whole thing down," said George Hamlin, vice president of aviation consulting firm Morten Beyer & Agnew, adding that Airbus should consider ending the...
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | July 9, 2008
US Airways Group Inc. said yesterday that it would remove in-flight movie systems from its domestic aircraft to save about $10 million a year in fuel and other costs. The carrier decided to pull the entertainment systems because the number of people paying $5 for headsets has dropped as money spent on jet fuel, maintenance and studio fees has climbed. The video systems add about 500 pounds to a plane's weight, increasing fuel use. "When you combine dramatically increasing expense with dramatically decreasing revenue, that is a bad recipe and we simply can't afford to do it anymore," Travis Christ, US Airways vice president for sales and marketing, said.
BUSINESS
By Peter Pae and Peter Pae,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 11, 2008
In a high-stakes rivalry pitting two of the world's largest defense contractors, Northrop Grumman Corp. gambled and won. The word came down Feb. 29 from the U.S. Air Force that a contract worth up to $40 billion for aerial refueling tankers would go to Northrop and its partner, Airbus, a unit of Netherlands-based European Aeronautic Defence and Space Co. Shut out was rival Boeing Co., which thought it had a winner. It was a decision likened to last month's stunning Super Bowl loss by the heavily favored New England Patriots, with the favorite losing a cliffhanger.
BUSINESS
By Geraldine Baum and Geraldine Baum,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 20, 2007
PARIS -- At Yves Saint Laurent, the storied French design house that manufactures exclusively in Europe, the plunging value of the U.S. dollar has CEO Valerie Hermann thinking about the number of pockets on a skirt and the price of embroidery on a dress. Hermann is adamant that YSL must include in its ready-to-wear offerings cocktail dresses that don't cost more than 1,900 euros. "It's a crucial limit," she said. Six months ago, that was the equivalent of $2,565. Today, she'd have to sell the same garment for $215 more to make the same profit.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | October 16, 2007
TOULOUSE, France -- There were no Jacuzzis or bowling alleys. No casinos or gyms. But the chilled bottle of champagne perched on an elegantly laid-out double bed said it all. Singapore Airlines introduced the interior of its first A380 superjumbo jet in an elaborate ceremony here yesterday, bringing an end to a decade of anticipation over what the airline has said would be a vast change in the level of quality and comfort in long-haul air travel....
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | June 19, 2007
PARIS -- Airlines gave a major lift to the order book for the next generation Airbus A350 yesterday, announcing contracts for 114 of the planes on the first day of the Paris Air Show. The vote of confidence puts the late-to-the-gate program on more solid footing, although it is still well behind Boeing's rival jet. The A350 orders, worth more than $27 billion, were part of a total haul of 219 firm orders and 120 provisional ones - including 13 for the much-delayed A380 superjumbo - with a combined value of $45.7 billion at list prices.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | March 20, 2007
China will set up a company to build large passenger airplanes, a first step as it seeks to take on Boeing Co. of the U.S. and Airbus SAS of Europe. Premier Wen Jiabao approved the plan at a Feb. 26 Cabinet meeting in Beijing, according to a statement posted on the central government's Web site Sunday. "Building a large aircraft is an important strategic decision of the Communist Party and the State Council, and it has been the desire of all Chinese people for many years," the government said in its statement.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 1, 2005
BRUSSELS, Belgium - The United States and European Union sued each other at the World Trade Organization over subsidies to airplane makers Airbus SAS and Boeing Co., setting the stage for the biggest clash in the WTO's 10-year history. The EU asked the WTO yesterday to outlaw U.S. aid to Boeing, a day after the Bush administration revived its case against European government loans to Airbus. Boeing lost its lead as the world's top seller of commercial jets to Airbus two years ago. Boeing, which EU Trade Commissioner Peter Mandelson said was instrumental in pressuring the United States to lodge the complaint, is attacking Airbus "not because it fears subsidies, but because it fears competition," he told a Brussels news conference.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | June 19, 2007
PARIS -- Airlines gave a major lift to the order book for the next generation Airbus A350 yesterday, announcing contracts for 114 of the planes on the first day of the Paris Air Show. The vote of confidence puts the late-to-the-gate program on more solid footing, although it is still well behind Boeing's rival jet. The A350 orders, worth more than $27 billion, were part of a total haul of 219 firm orders and 120 provisional ones - including 13 for the much-delayed A380 superjumbo - with a combined value of $45.7 billion at list prices.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | November 8, 2006
NEW YORK -- FedEx Corp. scrapped an order for 10 Airbus A380s yesterday and switched to Boeing Co. 777s, the first cancellation as a result of repeated production delays on the world's largest commercial jet. With the A380 program already struggling, "this could potentially be the domino that knocks the whole thing down," said George Hamlin, vice president of aviation consulting firm Morten Beyer & Agnew, adding that Airbus should consider ending the...
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | October 22, 2006
Lesson to investors: Your holdings must be a watched pot, because the status quo in an industry can change quickly. Let's go back to early last year. European aircraft manufacturer Airbus SAS seemed capable of cleaning the clock of U.S. rival Boeing Co. The devastating volley would be its superjumbo A380 passenger jet, proudly unveiled in a ceremony in France. Just as important, its division of labor between German, French, Spanish and British production sites symbolized unity among nations that felt they could take on U.S. industry head to head and win. Wrong.
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