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By Jack Kelly | February 15, 2002
PITTSBURGH - There was irritation in the Army over the starring role played by the Marines in Afghanistan even though it is hundreds of miles from the nearest ocean. "Does it bother anyone else that the Marines are the first regular forces in landlocked Afghanistan?" The Washington Post quoted Capt. Robert Krumm as asking in December. "We get to watch the Marines perform Army missions because they can do them better." Maj. Donald Vandergriff, one of the Army's brightest thinkers, thinks the Army is in danger of "becoming irrelevant" because it hasn't moved fast enough to make its combat units lighter and easier to deploy.
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NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun reporter | August 5, 2008
When Sgt. Ryan P. Baumann told his family five years ago that he wanted to join the Army, relatives say they knew it was coming. Sergeant Baumann spent eight years of his childhood in Germany, where he picked up a foreign language and learned the ins and outs of Army life. "Ryan grew up around the miliary," said his mother, Cindy Lohman, who worked as a civilian nurse on a base in Germany. "It didn't surprise me. His heroes were guys in the 82nd [Airborne Division]. And he was a post 9-11 child, so he felt very committed to doing something to protect this country."
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NEWS
April 14, 2007
As of yesterday, at least 3,297 members of the U.S. military have died since the beginning of the Iraq war in March 2003. Identifications Staff Sgt. Marcus A. Golczynski, 30, Lewisburg, Tenn.; killed March 27 in combat in Anbar province; assigned to the Marine Reserve's 3rd Battalion, 24th Marine Regiment, 4th Marine Division; Nashville, Tenn. Master Sgt. Sean M. Thomas, 33, Harrisburg, Pa.; killed March 27 by small-arms fire in Baghdad; assigned to the 28th Division Support Command.
NEWS
By Max Boot | June 8, 2007
The Navy is on a tear. Late last month, for the sixth time in six weeks, a skipper was relieved of command. The latest to get the sack was Cmdr. E. J. McClure of the guided missile destroyer Arleigh Burke, which had a "soft grounding" while heading back to port in the well-charted waters off Norfolk, Va. These firings have sparked debate in military circles, with some critics from other services charging that the Navy is guilty of a "zero defect" mentality...
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | August 21, 1992
WILLOW GROVE, Pa. -- The C-141s came in from the north with the weight of history and the lightness of air.Pvt. Mike Junio of nearby Philadelphia was fifth in line, in the first plane, on the first pass over Willow Grove Naval Air Station.At that moment, 800 feet above the ground in a windowless airplane, the 20-year-old paratrooper wasn't thinking about the 50 years the Army's 82nd Airborne Division has been doing operations like this; wasn't thinking about the World War II campaigns in Sicily, Salerno, Anzio and Normandy, or the Tet Offensive in Vietnam, or Grenada, or Panama, or, most recently, the Desert Storm operation in Iraq.
NEWS
October 29, 1992
Retired Army Lt. Gen. Ridgely Gaither, a pioneer paratrooper who served as police commissioner of Annapolis after retiring in 1962 as commander of the 2nd Army at Fort Meade, died Monday of heart failure at the Fairfield Nursing Center in Crownsville.Services for General Gaither, who was 89 and lived in Annapolis Roads, will be conducted at 11 a.m. Monday at St. Anne's Episcopal Church, in Church Circle in Annapolis, followed at 1 p.m. by services at Arlington National Cemetery.Born in Baltimore, he was a graduate of Boys' Latin School and began his career as a military officer in 1924 after his graduation from St. John's College in Annapolis.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 6, 2003
NEAR NAJAF, Iraq - The temperature reached 112 degrees in Baghdad yesterday and the high 90s elsewhere in Iraq, leading U.S. soldiers to strip off their protective biochemical suits to seek relief from the withering heat. Supply tanks filled with water wended their way to the troops, who have been ordered to drink 2 gallons a day to stave off heat exhaustion. Not everyone was so lucky; two soldiers with the 101st Airborne Division collapsed from dehydration, the first stage of heat-related illness.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun reporter | August 5, 2008
When Sgt. Ryan P. Baumann told his family five years ago that he wanted to join the Army, relatives say they knew it was coming. Sergeant Baumann spent eight years of his childhood in Germany, where he picked up a foreign language and learned the ins and outs of Army life. "Ryan grew up around the miliary," said his mother, Cindy Lohman, who worked as a civilian nurse on a base in Germany. "It didn't surprise me. His heroes were guys in the 82nd [Airborne Division]. And he was a post 9-11 child, so he felt very committed to doing something to protect this country."
NEWS
November 5, 2004
James Gorman Keeney, a former Sweetheart Cup Co. worker and World War II paratrooper, died from complications of heart disease and diabetes Sunday at his Finksburg home. He was 81. Mr. Keeney was born and raised on a farm in Savage. He attended Howard County public schools until leaving to help support himself. In 1943, he enlisted in the Army, and after completing paratrooper training, he joined the 17th Airborne Division. He later served with the 101st Airborne Division, better known as the Screaming Eagles.
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 27, 1991
DHAHRAN, Saudi Arabia -- DHAHRAN, Saudi Arabia -- 1om U.S. combat units positioned near the Kuwaiti border may be several weeks away from receiving all their equipment and completing final rehearsals for a massive land assault against Iraq, according to military personnel.The 3rd Armored Division, the last major unit to be deployed to Saudi Arabia, has barely one-third of its heavy armor and attack helicopters ready for action.Another German-based Army unit, the 1st Armored Division, was not expected to receive its Bradley fighting vehicles and other combat equipment until this weekend at the earliest.
NEWS
April 14, 2007
As of yesterday, at least 3,297 members of the U.S. military have died since the beginning of the Iraq war in March 2003. Identifications Staff Sgt. Marcus A. Golczynski, 30, Lewisburg, Tenn.; killed March 27 in combat in Anbar province; assigned to the Marine Reserve's 3rd Battalion, 24th Marine Regiment, 4th Marine Division; Nashville, Tenn. Master Sgt. Sean M. Thomas, 33, Harrisburg, Pa.; killed March 27 by small-arms fire in Baghdad; assigned to the 28th Division Support Command.
NEWS
November 5, 2004
James Gorman Keeney, a former Sweetheart Cup Co. worker and World War II paratrooper, died from complications of heart disease and diabetes Sunday at his Finksburg home. He was 81. Mr. Keeney was born and raised on a farm in Savage. He attended Howard County public schools until leaving to help support himself. In 1943, he enlisted in the Army, and after completing paratrooper training, he joined the 17th Airborne Division. He later served with the 101st Airborne Division, better known as the Screaming Eagles.
NEWS
By Patrick J. McDonnell and Patrick J. McDonnell,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 13, 2004
CAMP FALLUJAH, Iraq - The departing Marine commander of turbulent western Iraq, reflecting yesterday on the fall of Fallujah to insurgent forces, said officers on the ground disagreed with two key decisions: Storming the city in April after the slayings of four U.S. contractors and pulling back after three days of fierce fighting. Lt. Gen. James T. Conway, who stepped down yesterday to become deputy director of operations at the Joint Chiefs of Staff, provided fresh insight into the controversial U.S. moves last spring that helped solidify Fallujah's position as a sanctuary for insurgents and a no-go zone for U.S. troops.
NEWS
April 20, 2004
Wayne, Columbia: Do most soldiers feel what the United States is doing in Iraq is appreciated by Iraq or viewed as an invasion of Iraq's own affairs? And should our troops be there in the first place? I ask this because I read and see mixed responses to this question in the media. Calvert: Soldiers I've talked to both here and in Iraq say they think most Iraqis were glad to see Saddam Hussein toppled and [are] thankful for the U.S. military's subsequent efforts to restore civil order. That said, soldiers also knew that most Iraqis have always hoped the occupation would end sooner than later, and the troops understand that desire.
NEWS
October 26, 2003
Attacks against American soldiers in Iraq have been on the rise in the past three weeks, going from a daily average of 20 up to 25. One day, 35 attacks were reported. "The enemy has evolved, a little bit more lethal, a little bit more complex, a little bit more sophisticated," Lt. Gen. Ricardo Sanchez, the commander of U.S. ground forces in Iraq, said last week. "As long as we are here, the coalition needs to be prepared to take casualties." Since March, 345 U.S. troops have died in Iraq, 223 of them from hostile fire.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 11, 2003
NEAR ISKANDARIYAH, Iraq - Brig. Gen. Edward Sinclair, touring what amounts to a small city he is building on a former military airfield here, hopped out of his Humvee and marched over to a truck parked near a battery of howitzer guns pointed skyward. "It's General Sinclair," he announced. "Get your butt out here so I can talk to you." As soon as Lt. Marshall Clay poked his head out, Sinclair asked, "Who told you to set up here?" The battalion, said Clay, tentatively. Sinclair shook his head no. Clay had set up operations on what was going to be the parking place for a general's helicopter.
NEWS
October 26, 2003
Attacks against American soldiers in Iraq have been on the rise in the past three weeks, going from a daily average of 20 up to 25. One day, 35 attacks were reported. "The enemy has evolved, a little bit more lethal, a little bit more complex, a little bit more sophisticated," Lt. Gen. Ricardo Sanchez, the commander of U.S. ground forces in Iraq, said last week. "As long as we are here, the coalition needs to be prepared to take casualties." Since March, 345 U.S. troops have died in Iraq, 223 of them from hostile fire.
NEWS
By Max Boot | June 8, 2007
The Navy is on a tear. Late last month, for the sixth time in six weeks, a skipper was relieved of command. The latest to get the sack was Cmdr. E. J. McClure of the guided missile destroyer Arleigh Burke, which had a "soft grounding" while heading back to port in the well-charted waters off Norfolk, Va. These firings have sparked debate in military circles, with some critics from other services charging that the Navy is guilty of a "zero defect" mentality...
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 6, 2003
NEAR NAJAF, Iraq - The temperature reached 112 degrees in Baghdad yesterday and the high 90s elsewhere in Iraq, leading U.S. soldiers to strip off their protective biochemical suits to seek relief from the withering heat. Supply tanks filled with water wended their way to the troops, who have been ordered to drink 2 gallons a day to stave off heat exhaustion. Not everyone was so lucky; two soldiers with the 101st Airborne Division collapsed from dehydration, the first stage of heat-related illness.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 3, 2002
WASHINGTON - Hundreds of U.S. and Afghan troops, supported by American warplanes and attack helicopters, launched at dawn yesterday the largest allied ground offensive of the 5-month-old military campaign in Afghanistan, focusing on pockets of Taliban and al-Qaida fighters huddled in the rugged, snow-covered mountains outside the eastern city of Gardez. One American and three Afghan government soldiers were killed in what officials said was fierce fighting. An unspecified number of U.S. and Afghan soldiers were wounded, said Navy Cmdr.
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