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NEWS
February 10, 1991
Speculation on how and when the United States will launch a land war against Iraq has now reached a fevered pitch reminiscent of the tense run-up to President Bush's Jan. 17 decision to unleash the air war. What advice Defense Secretary Dick Cheney and Gen. Colin L. Powell bring back from the war zone is bound to be shrouded in contradiction, disinformation and conjecture. And rightly so. This background noise not only helps to preserve the element of military surprise but is part of the psychological warfare directed at Saddam Hussein and those Iraqis with a potential to remove him from power.
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NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2012
With about a month to go before Election Day, I know it won't be long before the commercials get even more ominous. Any day now, I'm sure I'll see one that starts, in that scary-movie-trailer voice, "In a world in which …" I can even provide the rest of the ad copy: For the vote-yes-on-Question-7 set: "In a world in which gambling isn't expanded in Maryland, unemployment will rise to new heights and those out of work will sink to new lows....
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NEWS
By JEFFREY RECORD | November 21, 1991
Washington. - Saddam Hussein's continuance in power and the revelations of how much of Iraq's enormous nuclear, biological and chemical weapons programs survived last winter's strategic bombardment campaign have irreparably tarnished claims still being made on air power's behalf by the Air Force and other air-power zealots.To be sure, air power, in the form of tactical strikes directly against Iraqi military units and their supply lines, was decisive in cutting off and killing Iraqi forces in Kuwait.
NEWS
December 28, 2008
Just after the end of World War I, to honor all the men and women participating in the war effort, a Christmas Military Dance was held Dec. 28, 1918, at the Bel Air Armory. The festivities were organized by the ladies connected with the Service Club of Harford County for Soldiers and the personnel of the local chapter of the American Red Cross (which had been officially formed the previous year). The Edgewood Arsenal Band furnished the music for the festive evening. "All are expected to come and enter into the holiday spirit and show their appreciation of the dawning of peace," wrote the Aegis newspaper.
NEWS
By Charles W. Corddry and Charles W. Corddry,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 10, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Iraqi military machine and its economic underpinnings have already been so devastated that it would take as long as a generation to rebuild, according to a senior Pentagon official.Predicting that ground war would now come "fairly soon" in the Persian Gulf, this official said that the air campaign was "a week or so behind where we would like to be" at this stage of the conflict.This lag was attributed to bad weather early in the campaign and to diversion of aircraft from planned missions to seek out missile launchers hurling Scuds into Saudi Arabia and Israel.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | January 27, 1991
Everybody has seen it by now, and it seems so reassuring: the trajectory of a bomb with a Ph.D., which, in defiance of laws such as gravity, physics or whimsy, descends with a draftsman's precision toward not a building but a building's door, plunges through like a bustling FedEx deliveryman, then detonates thunderously inside, atomizing any and all who work within.It helps, of course, that the image is taken from infrared film, because it is thereby denuded of texture or nuance and seems to be reduced to eerie absolutes: just a glowing smart bomb and a glowing dumb target and an explosion.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 30, 1999
CAIRO, Egypt -- While NATO jets have been slamming targets in Yugoslavia for the past nine weeks, America's other -- and far less visible -- air war has intensified over Iraq.Virtually unnoticed, U.S. and British aircraft have responded to what the coalition partners describe as provocations by Baghdad. The allied fighter jets, flying from Turkey and the Persian Gulf, have been chipping away systematically at Iraqi radar posts, air defenses and other military and command facilities.Despite the allies' use of laser-guided rockets and other precision munitions, Iraq claims that some of the strikes have gone astray, destroying private property, killing at least 20 civilians and leaving scores injured.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 30, 1999
AVIANO AIR BASE, Italy -- The only visible signs of the target were the tire tracks disappearing under a camouflage net in a row of burned-out buildings near the Pristina airport. That was enough for Air Force Lt. Col. Mark Grabey. He dropped two laser-guided bombs from his F-16 fighter jet.Thirty seconds later, an SA-6 missile launcher exploded into a fireball, missiles corkscrewing into the sky, and Grabey "jinked like crazy to get out of there."The air war over Yugoslavia has pitted a tenacious and inventive Serbian military against a massive NATO force hamstrung by political constraints.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Karen Hosler and Jonathan Weisman and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 20, 1999
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton formally asked Congress yesterday for more than $6 billion to pay for the air war over Yugoslavia, triggering what will likely be a divisive debate over defense spending and the combat readiness of a U.S. military that is deployed around the world.The budget request would finance the cost of the air war, pay for humanitarian relief and help shore up the delicate economies and political systems of neighboring countries in the Balkan region, from Albania to Bulgaria.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 16, 2001
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia - Every war has a hotel. In Saigon, it was the Continental-Palace, a graceful colonial building famed for the "Continental Shelf," a veranda bar that was the meeting place for journalists and the military. In Beirut, it was the Commodore, which featured a parrot that could imitate incoming artillery rounds and telex machines that never broke down. In Baghdad it was the Al-Rashid with a mosaic of former President George Bush that you had to step on to get into the lobby.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun reporter | July 28, 2008
WASHINGTON - Daily airstrikes by U.S. and allied fighter-bombers in Afghanistan have almost doubled since last summer, according to U.S. Air Force data, a trend that reflects increased insurgent attacks but also raises concerns about civilian casualties. The growing reliance on airstrikes by U.S. commanders in Afghanistan appears to mark a turn in the course of the war. Responding to requests from ground commanders, allied aircraft over the past week have pummeled enemy ground targets an average of 68 times a day across Afghanistan, dropping 500- and 2,000-pound guided bombs and strafing enemy forces with cannon fire, according to Air Force daily strike reports.
NEWS
By LAURA KING AND RONE TEMPEST and LAURA KING AND RONE TEMPEST,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 1, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert declared yesterday that Israel had no intention of ending its battle against Hezbollah anytime soon, despite a fragile lull in fighting that allowed some humanitarian supplies to reach civilians in war-battered Lebanon. Israeli officials said they would expand the ground offensive and described a 48-hour hiatus in major airstrikes as a "humanitarian gesture" rather than any prelude to a speedy cease-fire, which Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice had said could be reached this week.
NEWS
March 18, 2005
BOEING CO. has been going through a troubled patch. It's now searching for its third CEO in less than two years, having recently lost one to an extramarital affair and another to various scandals. It's had a series of legal problems affecting military contracts, including a 20-month Air Force ban on bidding for rocket work. And it's lost about 20 percent of the world commercial aircraft market in the last five years to its only competitor, Airbus, which became the world's No. 1 plane-maker in 2003.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | December 17, 2004
Low-cost leader Southwest Airlines showed its muscle yesterday by winning more gates at a pivotal Midwest hub, crowding out its competitors and solidifying its stature as the dominant carrier at a growing number of airports. Southwest won control of six additional gates at Chicago Midway Airport, giving it more than half of the total, during a bitterly contested auction of assets from ATA Airlines, which filed for bankruptcy protection Oct. 26. It beat out smaller low-cost rival AirTran Airlines, which had hoped to grow beyond its East Coast strength and, for the first time, take on Southwest's dominance.
NEWS
September 4, 2003
IRAQ IS at a critical juncture. Bombings continue to take a toll - in lives, morale and confidence. America's friends there are given reason to doubt America's ability to protect them. International aid organizations have pulled out. The U.S. administrator admits that the occupation will cost many billions of dollars. The U.S. Army has begun to calculate that potentially drastic moves will be required to maintain troop levels. Throughout the country now, anger directed at Americans is growing, and terrorists of many nations are by all accounts heading toward Baghdad to wage jihad.
NEWS
By Greg Miller and Richard T. Cooper and Greg Miller and Richard T. Cooper,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 20, 2003
WASHINGTON - As they launched an opening attack last night, some U.S. military planners say the best chance for toppling Saddam Hussein through airstrikes is to destroy his inner rings of security and expose the Iraqi leader to an uprising by his own people. Many Pentagon officials are crossing their fingers that one of the bombs will hit Hussein, effectively ending the war before it has completely begun. It would also eliminate the messy problem of what to do with Hussein if he were captured alive.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Jonathan Weisman and Karen Hosler and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 29, 1999
WASHINGTON -- In a sharp rebuke to President Clinton, the House vented its alarm about the conflict in Yugoslavia by voting yesterday to bar the use of ground troops without congressional approval and by withholding its support for the air war already under way.Hours after Clinton pleaded with lawmakers to oppose legislation that could undercut American unity, the House voted 248-180 for a bill that would deny money for U.S. ground forces unless Congress provided...
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Jonathan Weisman and Tom Bowman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 11, 1999
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton declared "victory for a safer world, for our democratic values and for a stronger America" last night after defeated Yugoslav forces began to withdraw from Kosovo and allied troops prepared to enter the war-torn province beginning as early as tomorrow."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 21, 2002
KABUL, Afghanistan - The U.S. air campaign in Afghanistan, based on a high-tech out-of-harm's-way strategy, has produced a pattern of mistakes that has killed hundreds of Afghan civilians. On-site reviews by The New York Times of 11 places where civilians have been killed in airstrikes suggest that American commanders have sometimes relied on mistaken information from local Afghans. Also, the military's preference for airstrikes instead of riskier ground operations has made it harder to discover when the intelligence is wrong.
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