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BUSINESS
By Tom Belden and Tom Belden,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 25, 1991
The time has come to operate airports and the air-traffic control system more like private-sector businesses, according to analysts at two think tanks that favor less government involvement in the economy.Although the proposals from the Heritage Foundation and the Reason Foundation have many critics, there's little disagreement over the problem they seek to solve: Air traffic spawned by deregulation of airlines is growing faster than the nation's airports and air-control system.The foundations contend that the only way for the system to keep pace with the growth efficiently and safely is to let the profit motive take over where government management isn't working.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
Dozens of flights have been cancelled or delayed at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport Friday morning due to a grounding of air traffic in Chicago following a fire at a nearby radar facility. By nearly 9 p.m., there had been 38 flights cancelled and 142 flights delayed at BWI, according to flight tracker FlightAware.com. Police in Illinois have said the fire at the Federal Aviation Administration facility in Aurora, which grounded hundreds of flights at Chicago's O'Hare and Midway airport, was intentionally set but "is no terrorist act. " A contract employee was found in the basement of the radar facility suffering from self-inflicted wounds, police said.
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NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2012
Twelve massive windows in the air traffic control tower at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport have been replaced after 30 years, an airport official said Thursday. Each of the new windows weighs about 850 pounds and measures more than eight feet wide and eight feet tall, according to a statement from Jonathan Dean, a spokesman for the airport. All of the windows are 1.5 inches thick, he said. The windows meet standards for strength, transparency, glare reduction and wind resistance, he said.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
University of Maryland officials on Tuesday announced the launch of a new test site to study how drones may coexist with jets, helicopters and other air traffic in U.S. airspace. The long-planned site is to be based near Naval Air Station Patuxent River in Southern Maryland, long a key research site for the Navy. It will be managed by the A. James Clark School of Engineering at College Park. "With [Pax River] serving as a premier facility for research, development, testing, and evaluation, our region is already a hub for aviation innovation," Rep. Steny Hoyer, whose district includes the university and the test site, said in a statement.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
The Federal Aviation Administration on Wednesday released the closure dates for 149 air traffic control towers - including five in Maryland - affected by federal budget cuts. Martin State Airport in Baltimore County, Frederick Municipal Airport and Easton/Newnam Field in Easton will close on April 21. Hagerstown Regional Airport and Salisbury- Ocean City Wicomico Airport will close on May 5. In a memo to affected airports, the FAA outlined two options for the operator: Continue as a non-towered airport, relying on pilots to communicate takeoffs and landings on a common frequency, or provide and pay for tower services.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
Dozens of flights have been cancelled or delayed at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport Friday morning due to a grounding of air traffic in Chicago following a fire at a nearby radar facility. By nearly 9 p.m., there had been 38 flights cancelled and 142 flights delayed at BWI, according to flight tracker FlightAware.com. Police in Illinois have said the fire at the Federal Aviation Administration facility in Aurora, which grounded hundreds of flights at Chicago's O'Hare and Midway airport, was intentionally set but "is no terrorist act. " A contract employee was found in the basement of the radar facility suffering from self-inflicted wounds, police said.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | March 5, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A consortium of five American and foreign high technology companies will set up offices near Baltimore-Washington International Airport to devise a plan to upgrade the air traffic control systems of the Soviet Union.The Global Air Transportation Systems and Services group, led by Westinghouse Electric Corp., announced yesterday that it has signed an agreement with Soviet officials to come up with a strategy to improve the Soviet Union's air space system and integrate it with the rest of the world by 2005.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | February 5, 1993
All his life Mike Finucane had worked hard and played by the rules.He graduated from high school, went into the Air Force, learned a good trade, got out and became an air traffic controller at O'Hare Airport in Chicago."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 19, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A brief and supposedly impossible power failure at an air traffic control center near Kansas City tore the heart out of the Federal Aviation Administration's national network for several hours yesterday morning, forcing hundreds of planes to be diverted or delayed and inconveniencing tens of thousands of passengers.College students on their way home for Christmas, business executives making late-week flights, and families getting an early start on holiday travel sat in airports into the evening as delays cascaded around the country.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1997
A small Gaithersburg company has captured a $3 million contract from Raytheon Services Inc. to help improve air traffic control technology at American airports.The contract is small and spread out over a nine-year period, but Optelecom Inc. said yesterday that it hopes the contract will establish the company as a source for air traffic control equipment.Last month, Raytheon won a $1 billion Federal Aviation Administration contract to improve the decades-old computer systems that air traffic controllers use to monitor airspace within a 50-mile radius of airports.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2013
Five air traffic control towers in Maryland that are part of 149 "low activity" towers nationwide will remain open through the end of the September, the U.S. Department of Transportation announced Friday. The towers, including those at Martin State Airport in Baltimore County and Easton/Newnam Field on the Eastern Shore had been slated to close in June under federal budget cuts known as sequestration. Legislation approved by Congress last month gave the Federal Aviation Administration authority to transfer money from other accounts to keep the towers open.
NEWS
April 30, 2013
It's no mystery that the crossroads of Routes 1 and 24 in Bel Air is a traffic tangle, so it's perfectly reasonable that the Bel Air town government would want to spend at least a portion of an unexpected $200,000 highway windfall on a study of the intersection. When it comes down to doing the study, though, figuring out what's wrong isn't really the issue. Figuring out how to disperse traffic at busy times of day is going to be the part that, if someone can figure out, is worth spending a fair amount of money on. There's no reason, however, to expect a good resolution to the difficult problem at hand.
NEWS
April 29, 2013
What does it require to get members of Congress to take action quickly and decisively on an issue of federal spending? Now we know. The possibility that they will be delayed in an airport terminal somewhere waiting for a flight out of town is apparently so abhorrent that the usual gridlock and party politics just don't apply. That's the take-away from last week's lightning-fast, lopsided bipartisan votes that transferred more than a quarter-billion dollars to the Federal Aviation Administration budget so that the agency would no longer have to furlough air traffic controllers.
NEWS
April 29, 2013
The average air traffic controller works 230 days a year and does a flawless job ("Sequester disrupts airline passengers," April 23). There have been no major airlines crashes in nearly a decade. The average member of Congress, on the other hand, works barely 120 days a year and doesn't do his or her job at all. There have been no proper federal budgets passed in recent years, and as a result we now have the "sequester. " Which raises an interesting question: Why have the sequester-mandated cuts ended up laying off the air traffic controllers, who do their jobs, instead of members of Congress, who don't?
BUSINESS
By Hugo Martín, Adolfo Flores and Candy Thomson, Tribune Newspapers | April 23, 2013
Sequestration is starting to frustrate air travelers. About 400 flights were delayed Sunday because of air traffic controller furloughs, the Federal Aviation Administration said, and a few more interruptions were reported Monday, though the nation's air travel system operated without serious problems thanks to light traffic and good weather. Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport saw departure delays up to 75 minutes for a time on Monday afternoon, according to FlightStats.com.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
The Federal Aviation Administration announced Friday afternoon that it will delay the closure of all 149 federal contract air traffic control towers - including five in Maryland - until June 15. The announcement came just two days before the first of the towers was scheduled to be shuttered as part of across-the-board federal budget cuts approved by Congress. The FAA is required to cut $637 million from its $16 billion budget by the end of the fiscal year on Sept. 30. The extension will allow the agency to deal with multiple lawsuits, continue consulting with airports and review safety issues, the FAA said in its statement.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood JTC and Liz Atwood JTC,Evening Sun Staff | March 5, 1991
Maryland defense contractors looking to diversify their markets are reaping rewards from a $16 billion effort to improve the safety and efficiency of the nation's air traffic control system.Hunt Valley-based AAI Corp. recently landed a contract worth more than $200 million to produce the Automated Surface Observation System, which will provide instantaneous weather information to pilots and air traffic controllers.The Westinghouse Electronics Systems Group in Linthicum has contracts worth more than $1 billion to produce four kinds of radar systems for commercial airports around the country.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | March 27, 1993
Russia has signed an agreement with an international group of companies, including a local unit of the Westinghouse Electric Corp., to begin work on an estimated $10 billion program to modernize that country's air traffic control system.Westinghouse is the only U.S. member of the consortium, which includes Thomson-CSF, the world's second-largest electronics company, and JVC Buran, a joint venture of Russian industry groups with Alenia, a leading Italian radar manufacturer.While the three companies have rarely teamed on projects, they are hardly strangers.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
The Federal Aviation Administration on Wednesday released the closure dates for 149 air traffic control towers - including five in Maryland - affected by federal budget cuts. Martin State Airport in Baltimore County, Frederick Municipal Airport and Easton/Newnam Field in Easton will close on April 21. Hagerstown Regional Airport and Salisbury- Ocean City Wicomico Airport will close on May 5. In a memo to affected airports, the FAA outlined two options for the operator: Continue as a non-towered airport, relying on pilots to communicate takeoffs and landings on a common frequency, or provide and pay for tower services.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2013
A blizzard was expected to dump a couple of feet of snow across New England through midday today, and while Baltimore was largely spared, the storm delivered some wintry precipitation and headaches for travelers. At Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, dozens of flights to and from the Northeast were canceled, leaving some travelers scrambling to brave snowy roads in rental cars. Others landed there Friday from points north, escaping ahead of the expected 2 feet of snow, only to find limited options for getting anywhere else.
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