Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAir Support
IN THE NEWS

Air Support

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 30, 1997
Wilbur Richard Knorr, 51, a professor at Stanford University who traced the birth of mathematics in antiquity, died of melanoma March 18 in Palo Alto, Calif. A summa cum laude graduate of Harvard University, where he received a master's degree in 1968 and a doctorate in 1973, he joined the Stanford faculty in 1979 and held a joint appointment as a professor in the departments of philosophy and classics. Survivors include a sister in Columbia, Valerie Maione.Dr. David Miller, 80, an epidemiologist and son-in-law of the late Albert Schweitzer, died of lymphoma Thursday in Lavonia, Ga. He began working with Schweitzer in the 1960s at the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Gabon, and in 1971 married the Nobel Peace Prize winner's only child, Rhena.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2012
As they prepared for the helicopter assault in volatile eastern Afghanistan, the team of American and Afghan special-forces soldiers was told it might encounter 10 to 15 enemy fighters on the ground. But when the sun rose over Laghman Province that day two years ago, the men found themselves taking machine-gun fire from a force of more than 100. "It turned into a battle of survival," Maryland Air National Guard Capt. Barry F. Crawford Jr. said Wednesday. "The enemy was completely around us. They had called in reinforcements, and they were using the terrain to their advantage.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 26, 1995
WASHINGTON -- When Marine Capt. Robert Alexander was blown off his jeep-like Humvee by Iraqi shells during the Persian Gulf war, he radioed: "Under heavy artillery. Need immediate air support -- now."Minutes later, two Marine Harrier jets swooped low over the desert to destroy the mortar platoon that was pinning down the U.S. troops below."It was the most beautiful sight I had ever seen when those four bombs were arcing through the air," Captain Alexander said.He was heartened to see fellow Marines overhead rather than Air Force or Navy pilots, who are also trained in close air support.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 17, 2006
. The Air Force has conducted more than 2,000 airstrikes in Afghanistan over the past six months, a sharp increase in bombing that reflects the growing demand for U.S. air cover since NATO has assumed a larger ground combat role, Air Force officials said. The intensifying air campaign has focused on southern Afghanistan, where NATO units, primarily from Britain, Canada and the Netherlands, as well as U.S. Special Forces have been engaging in the heaviest and most frequent ground combat with Taliban rebels since the invasion five years ago. The NATO forces are mostly operating without heavy armor or artillery support, and as Taliban resistance has continued, more air support has been used to compensate for the lightness of the units, Air Force officials said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 17, 2006
. The Air Force has conducted more than 2,000 airstrikes in Afghanistan over the past six months, a sharp increase in bombing that reflects the growing demand for U.S. air cover since NATO has assumed a larger ground combat role, Air Force officials said. The intensifying air campaign has focused on southern Afghanistan, where NATO units, primarily from Britain, Canada and the Netherlands, as well as U.S. Special Forces have been engaging in the heaviest and most frequent ground combat with Taliban rebels since the invasion five years ago. The NATO forces are mostly operating without heavy armor or artillery support, and as Taliban resistance has continued, more air support has been used to compensate for the lightness of the units, Air Force officials said.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2012
As they prepared for the helicopter assault in volatile eastern Afghanistan, the team of American and Afghan special-forces soldiers was told it might encounter 10 to 15 enemy fighters on the ground. But when the sun rose over Laghman Province that day two years ago, the men found themselves taking machine-gun fire from a force of more than 100. "It turned into a battle of survival," Maryland Air National Guard Capt. Barry F. Crawford Jr. said Wednesday. "The enemy was completely around us. They had called in reinforcements, and they were using the terrain to their advantage.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 12, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Unless the Bosnian Serbs quiet their guns -- which at one point yesterday were raining eight shells a minute on Gorazde -- they could face escalating allied attack."
NEWS
By JEFFREY RECORD | November 21, 1991
Washington. - Saddam Hussein's continuance in power and the revelations of how much of Iraq's enormous nuclear, biological and chemical weapons programs survived last winter's strategic bombardment campaign have irreparably tarnished claims still being made on air power's behalf by the Air Force and other air-power zealots.To be sure, air power, in the form of tactical strikes directly against Iraqi military units and their supply lines, was decisive in cutting off and killing Iraqi forces in Kuwait.
NEWS
June 10, 2006
As allegations of further atrocities in Iraq surface, I feel that there must be many other Vietnam veterans who, like me, are shaken by feelings of dM-ijM-` vu. And one portion of The Sun's article "U.S. denies civilians were targets in raid" (June 3) stands out in particular. Referring to a raid apparently targeted at two people firing from one house, the report says, in part, that air support came "from an AC-130, a powerful gunship." The article should have gone on to inform readers that an AC-130 can cover every square foot of a city block with machine gun fire within seconds and that specific targeting is impossible.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | October 16, 1994
Sen. Phil Gramm, R-Texas, rode into Bel Air Tuesday afternoon as the brightest star in the Harford County Republican Central Committee's display of solidarity.Imitating national and state signing ceremonies, the county's GOP Central Committee had local candidates add their signatures to a "Republican Contract with the Citizens of Harford County."The ceremonial signing of the two-paragraph statement was held to let voters know that GOP candidates are "committed to individual liberty, economic opportunity and personal responsibility through limited and effective government."
NEWS
June 10, 2006
As allegations of further atrocities in Iraq surface, I feel that there must be many other Vietnam veterans who, like me, are shaken by feelings of dM-ijM-` vu. And one portion of The Sun's article "U.S. denies civilians were targets in raid" (June 3) stands out in particular. Referring to a raid apparently targeted at two people firing from one house, the report says, in part, that air support came "from an AC-130, a powerful gunship." The article should have gone on to inform readers that an AC-130 can cover every square foot of a city block with machine gun fire within seconds and that specific targeting is impossible.
NEWS
By Michael Slackman and Michael Slackman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 17, 2002
TEHRAN, Iran - Iraq's main opposition forces have begun coordinating their military efforts and would welcome U.S. air support in their bid to topple President Saddam Hussein, according to the leaders of one of the groups. Speaking from a guarded compound in Tehran, where he has been in exile for more than two decades, Shiite opposition leader Ayatollah Mohammed Bakr Hakim said last week that his organization opposes a full-blown U.S. invasion but supports the idea of a mission in which bombing paves the way for local forces to fight on the ground.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Jonathan Weisman and Karen Hosler and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 29, 1999
WASHINGTON -- In a sharp rebuke to President Clinton, the House vented its alarm about the conflict in Yugoslavia by voting yesterday to bar the use of ground troops without congressional approval and by withholding its support for the air war already under way.Hours after Clinton pleaded with lawmakers to oppose legislation that could undercut American unity, the House voted 248-180 for a bill that would deny money for U.S. ground forces unless Congress provided...
NEWS
March 30, 1997
Wilbur Richard Knorr, 51, a professor at Stanford University who traced the birth of mathematics in antiquity, died of melanoma March 18 in Palo Alto, Calif. A summa cum laude graduate of Harvard University, where he received a master's degree in 1968 and a doctorate in 1973, he joined the Stanford faculty in 1979 and held a joint appointment as a professor in the departments of philosophy and classics. Survivors include a sister in Columbia, Valerie Maione.Dr. David Miller, 80, an epidemiologist and son-in-law of the late Albert Schweitzer, died of lymphoma Thursday in Lavonia, Ga. He began working with Schweitzer in the 1960s at the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Gabon, and in 1971 married the Nobel Peace Prize winner's only child, Rhena.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 4, 1995
WASHINGTON -- As Britain and France announced plans to send thousands more troops to the Balkans, President Clinton scaled back his offer of U.S. ground forces to help United Nations peacekeepers yesterday and said American soldiers would be sent there only in a "highly unlikely" emergency.But while cutting back the prospective American role on the ground, U.S. officials expanded it in the air, as U.S. Defense Secretary William J. Perry pledged to offer aircraft flown by American pilots in support of Britain's and France's new quick-reaction force.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 26, 1995
WASHINGTON -- When Marine Capt. Robert Alexander was blown off his jeep-like Humvee by Iraqi shells during the Persian Gulf war, he radioed: "Under heavy artillery. Need immediate air support -- now."Minutes later, two Marine Harrier jets swooped low over the desert to destroy the mortar platoon that was pinning down the U.S. troops below."It was the most beautiful sight I had ever seen when those four bombs were arcing through the air," Captain Alexander said.He was heartened to see fellow Marines overhead rather than Air Force or Navy pilots, who are also trained in close air support.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 4, 1995
WASHINGTON -- As Britain and France announced plans to send thousands more troops to the Balkans, President Clinton scaled back his offer of U.S. ground forces to help United Nations peacekeepers yesterday and said American soldiers would be sent there only in a "highly unlikely" emergency.But while cutting back the prospective American role on the ground, U.S. officials expanded it in the air, as U.S. Defense Secretary William J. Perry pledged to offer aircraft flown by American pilots in support of Britain's and France's new quick-reaction force.
NEWS
By Michael Slackman and Michael Slackman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 17, 2002
TEHRAN, Iran - Iraq's main opposition forces have begun coordinating their military efforts and would welcome U.S. air support in their bid to topple President Saddam Hussein, according to the leaders of one of the groups. Speaking from a guarded compound in Tehran, where he has been in exile for more than two decades, Shiite opposition leader Ayatollah Mohammed Bakr Hakim said last week that his organization opposes a full-blown U.S. invasion but supports the idea of a mission in which bombing paves the way for local forces to fight on the ground.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | October 16, 1994
Sen. Phil Gramm, R-Texas, rode into Bel Air Tuesday afternoon as the brightest star in the Harford County Republican Central Committee's display of solidarity.Imitating national and state signing ceremonies, the county's GOP Central Committee had local candidates add their signatures to a "Republican Contract with the Citizens of Harford County."The ceremonial signing of the two-paragraph statement was held to let voters know that GOP candidates are "committed to individual liberty, economic opportunity and personal responsibility through limited and effective government."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 12, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Unless the Bosnian Serbs quiet their guns -- which at one point yesterday were raining eight shells a minute on Gorazde -- they could face escalating allied attack."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.