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NEWS
January 12, 1994
Embarrassed by a record of empty bombast, NATO continues to trip over itself in dealing with the murderous civil war in Bosnia. By renewing its threat to launch aerial strikes at Bosnian Serb forces hindering United Nations relief operations, it once again faces the risk of ending up doing nothing or getting entangled in a conflict practically of all its members would rather avoid.President Clinton has demonstrated American clout by bringing Britain and France into line behind long-held U.S. offers to use its air power to end the "strangulation" of Sarajevo and (this is new)
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | September 14, 2014
If. Two letters long, it is arguably the most fruitless word in the English language, an evocation of paths not taken, possibilities foreclosed, regrets stacked high -- and it lies like a pall of smoke over President Obama's Wednesday-night announcement that this country is returning to war, albeit with air strikes only, in a place we just left behind in 2011 after spending almost nine years, over a trillion dollars and 4,425 lives. If. As in, if President Bush had concentrated on toppling the Taliban in Afghanistan, which harbored the authors of the terrorist strike we suffered 13 years ago last week, if he had not rushed to judgment, convincing himself Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein was behind the attack, if his administration had not used suspect intelligence to claim Hussein possessed weapons of mass destruction, if we had not bought into the fantasy that we could impose a Jeffersonian democracy on another nation and have them thank us for it, if we had not destabilized the region, if we had never kicked this hornet's nest, would we now find ourselves obliged to confront the criminal gang that calls itself the Islamic State?
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 21, 1994
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Nearly all the Serbian guns ringing the Bosnian capital are out of action, United Nations officials said early this morning after a frantic day of diplomatic meetings, maneuvering behind the scenes and hoisting rusty cannons out of snowbanks."
NEWS
June 16, 2014
The lightening takeover of large parts of Syria and western Iraq last week by Sunni Muslim extremists has totally scrambled U.S. efforts to deal with a burgeoning conflict that threatens to engulf the entire region - and the situation got worse over the weekend when the insurgents announced they had murdered some 1,700 Shiite soldiers captured in the areas they control. The challenge for the Obama administration is that there are no good options to protect our immediate interest in halting the insurgents' advance that don't also work at cross-purposes to our long-term policy goals there.
NEWS
By Paul Martin and Paul Martin,Special to The Sun | February 8, 1994
Brussels -- When the NATO Council meets tomorrow to discuss U.N. Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali's call for authorization for air strikes in Bosnia, it will be in the firm knowledge that such a call could be answered "in a maximum of 30 minutes."More than 140 fighters and bombers under NATO command are deployed at Italian bases and on aircraft carriers close to the Bosnian coast ready for the order to strike.Hundreds of shells fall on Sarajevo each day from the estimated 230 artillery pieces and T-55 tanks ringing Sarajevo.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Special to The Sun | February 8, 1994
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic issued a veiled warning last night that no foreigners would be safe in Bosnia if the North Atlantic Treaty Organization launches air strikes against his positions in and around Sarajevo.In a televised interview from his stronghold of Pale, Mr. Karadzic said Bosnian Serbs "would defend ourselves with all means."But, he added, "I do think that, if there would be any air strikes, we would partially lose control. And in the ensuing chaos, anything is possible.
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau | August 3, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton played down assertions yesterday that U.S. warplanes would act alone to stop the Bosnian Serb onslaught in Sarajevo, predicting confidently that European allies will back his initiative for tougher military action to stop the bloodshed.As NATO ambassadors met in Brussels to consider U.S. proposals for greater Western military intervention in Bosnia, Mr. Clinton told reporters here: "We are working with the allies. We believe we will be able to work through to a common position."
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Staff writer | April 28, 1991
Brian Lee Mortimer thought he and his wife, Marianne, had things planned out so that he would be home when the couple's second child was born early in January."
NEWS
By Zainab Chaudry | November 19, 2012
The ultimate freedom is to live free from fear. A friend, a Palestinian refugee, once laughed. "You? You are American. You don't know the meaning of real fear. " I remained silent. In the context she described, having lived in Gaza for 17 years of her life, my friend was right. Perhaps real fear can be exemplified by intimidation and oppression; a lack of control over self-circumstance that obliterates all sense of autonomy and catapults victims into a prolonged state of dependency and helplessness.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | September 14, 2014
If. Two letters long, it is arguably the most fruitless word in the English language, an evocation of paths not taken, possibilities foreclosed, regrets stacked high -- and it lies like a pall of smoke over President Obama's Wednesday-night announcement that this country is returning to war, albeit with air strikes only, in a place we just left behind in 2011 after spending almost nine years, over a trillion dollars and 4,425 lives. If. As in, if President Bush had concentrated on toppling the Taliban in Afghanistan, which harbored the authors of the terrorist strike we suffered 13 years ago last week, if he had not rushed to judgment, convincing himself Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein was behind the attack, if his administration had not used suspect intelligence to claim Hussein possessed weapons of mass destruction, if we had not bought into the fantasy that we could impose a Jeffersonian democracy on another nation and have them thank us for it, if we had not destabilized the region, if we had never kicked this hornet's nest, would we now find ourselves obliged to confront the criminal gang that calls itself the Islamic State?
NEWS
By Zainab Chaudry | November 19, 2012
The ultimate freedom is to live free from fear. A friend, a Palestinian refugee, once laughed. "You? You are American. You don't know the meaning of real fear. " I remained silent. In the context she described, having lived in Gaza for 17 years of her life, my friend was right. Perhaps real fear can be exemplified by intimidation and oppression; a lack of control over self-circumstance that obliterates all sense of autonomy and catapults victims into a prolonged state of dependency and helplessness.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 13, 2007
ZERKOH, Afghanistan -- Scores of civilian deaths over the past months from heavy U.S. and allied reliance on airstrikes to battle Taliban insurgents are threatening popular support for the Afghan government and creating severe strains within the NATO alliance. Afghan, U.S. and other foreign officials say they worry about the political toll the civilian deaths are exacting on President Hamid Karzai, who the week before last issued another harsh condemnation of the U.S. and NATO tactics, and even of the entire international effort here.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | November 13, 2006
Each year when the air turns crisp, a few loyal customers head west on Liberty Road until fast-food restaurants give way to horse farms. Turning onto a long driveway, they pull past a jumble of tables tangled with vines to park by a turnip patch. Then they follow the instructions painted on a wooden sign in green and red letters: "For wood blow horn here." After a few moments, John Holbrook opens the door to his house and shuffles down the steps. At 81, he doesn't pull out his chainsaw so much anymore, but he still sells the logs he split a few years ago. It's good wood, he says, mostly long-burning locust, well aged by wind and sun. For folks who like to keep the home fires burning all winter long, buying pricey little bundles of wood at the gas station or grocery store is not an option.
NEWS
By ARTHUR HIRSCH and ARTHUR HIRSCH,SUN REPORTER | May 28, 2006
Retired Air Force Col. William Walter M. Deale, a decorated Vietnam War combat pilot who later helped to develop radar systems and the world's fastest jet, died of complications after heart surgery May 21 at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Towson resident was 77. Born and raised in Baltimore, Colonel Deale was a 1947 graduate of McDonogh School. After two years at Massachusetts Institute of Technology on a wrestling scholarship, he transferred to the U.S. Naval Academy and graduated in 1953.
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | April 11, 2006
PHILADELPHIA -- Perhaps it's psychological warfare, aimed at getting Iran to curb its nuclear research program. When Vice President Dick Cheney says that Iran will face "meaningful consequences" if it fails to halt nuclear research and that the United States is "keeping all options on the table," he might just be playing psychological hardball to get Tehran to cooperate with U.N. weapons inspectors. But the speculation about purported U.S. plans to bomb Iran has an ominously familiar ring.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 25, 2005
JERUSALEM // Israel launched a series of air strikes on the Gaza Strip yesterday in response to renewed rocket attacks by Palestinian militants on nearby Israeli communities. The moves by both sides cast doubt on attempts to get the Middle East road map for peace back on track. Israel's defense minister vowed to deliver a "crushing" blow to militants. At least two Palestinians were killed in the attacks, the first that Israel has staged since officially ending its 38-year military rule of the Gaza Strip this month when it pulled its settlers and soldiers out of the densely populated region.
NEWS
August 7, 1993
In AVIANO, Italy, Secretary of State Christopher reiterated that NATO will lalunch air strikes against Bosnian Serb forces unless they stop "strangling" Sarajevo.In Washington, a White House official said the United States wants Bosnia's president to know air strikes against his Serbian foes are unlikely unless he returns to the negotiating table.Bosnian Serbs balked at easing the siege of SARAJEVO, failing to reach agreement with the United Nations on their promise to hand over strategic positions .Senior U.S. officials met at the White House to discuss U.S. strategy for a NATO meeting Monday aimed at deciding on air strikes in Bosnia, officials said.
NEWS
By George F. Will | November 1, 2001
WASHINGTON - When Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres, accompanied by Ambassador David Ivry, recently visited the Oval Office, President Bush remarked that Israel certainly has the right ambassador for the moment. He said this because Mr. Ivry has shown that he understands how preventive action is pertinent to the problem of weapons of mass destruction in dangerous hands. Mr. Bush's remark, pregnant with implications, revealed that the president as well as the vice president remember and admire a bold Israeli action for which Israel was roundly condemned 20 years ago. On the afternoon of June 7, 1981, Jordan's King Hussein, yachting in the Gulf of Aqaba, saw eight low-flying Israeli F-16s roar eastward.
SPORTS
By Derek Toney and Derek Toney,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 31, 2000
C.M. Wright coach Joe Dunch was concerned about how long ace starter Laura Siler could go yesterday against Bel Air after throwing the day before for the first time after a car accident last Saturday. Siler eased Dunch's fears as well as helping the No. 13 Mustangs quiet host Bel Air, 12-1, in a Harford County contest to remain unbeaten in three outings. C.M. Wright put three runs across in the opening inning against the Bobcats (2-2), then added five more in the third and four in the fifth to conclude the match in five innings.
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