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By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | June 30, 1996
During the past three decades, the Federal Aviation Administration has rejected 532 recommendations that the National Transportation Safety Board said were necessary to improve air safety.The recommendations are contained in a 750-page document some NTSB investigators call the "I-told-you-so list" -- because items occasionally come back to haunt the industry in crashes.FAA officials, on the other hand, say the agency has adopted or is reviewing almost 83 percent of the safety board's 3,300 recommendations.
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October 26, 2011
The Bel Air Police Department, the Bel Air Lions Club and Tiny Toes, a Main Street business, hosted their yearly "Kid Print" Child Safety Fair in Shamrock Park on Oct. 8 and more than 300 children enjoyed the fun. The program was free and children were treated to pony rides, face painting, McGruff the Crime Dog, ice cream, hot dogs and a moon bounce. Town Department of Public Works vehicles were on display as well which included a trash truck, dump truck and front end loader.
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EXPLORE
October 26, 2011
The Bel Air Police Department, the Bel Air Lions Club and Tiny Toes, a Main Street business, hosted their yearly "Kid Print" Child Safety Fair in Shamrock Park on Oct. 8 and more than 300 children enjoyed the fun. The program was free and children were treated to pony rides, face painting, McGruff the Crime Dog, ice cream, hot dogs and a moon bounce. Town Department of Public Works vehicles were on display as well which included a trash truck, dump truck and front end loader.
NEWS
April 4, 2008
The Federal Aviation Administration's first responsibility is to ensure the safety of millions who travel on U.S. carriers here and abroad. But the agency's apparent interest in accommodating airlines more than protecting passengers has whistleblowers and congressional investigators pushing for reform. The evidence is convincing that significant reforms are needed. The present system, as explained in congressional testimony yesterday, relies too much on voluntary compliance and has permitted airlines to avoid punishment for maintenance lapses.
FEATURES
By Arnie Rosenberg and Arnie Rosenberg,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | August 24, 1997
Air travel remains 21 times safer than driving in a car, according to the National Safety Council.Nevertheless, when a single crash kills hundreds of people, as happened in recently in Guam, consumers begin asking, "How safe is flying? How safe is the airline or aircraft I'll be flying on?"The Federal Aviation Administration evaluates foreign governments' ability to meet aviation-safety standards established by the United Nations and reports its findings on its Web page, but does not rank foreign and domestic airlines by their safety records.
NEWS
April 4, 2008
The Federal Aviation Administration's first responsibility is to ensure the safety of millions who travel on U.S. carriers here and abroad. But the agency's apparent interest in accommodating airlines more than protecting passengers has whistleblowers and congressional investigators pushing for reform. The evidence is convincing that significant reforms are needed. The present system, as explained in congressional testimony yesterday, relies too much on voluntary compliance and has permitted airlines to avoid punishment for maintenance lapses.
NEWS
By Joan Beck | September 15, 1996
GRIEF AND ANGER over the explosion of TWA Flight 800 go unabated with the slow pace of the investigation into what is almost certainly a bombing.Even the most intrepid airline passengers chilled as a jury last week convicted a Pakistani terrorist of planning to blow up a dozen U.S. planes flying over the Pacific in January 1995. The first bomb did explode on a flight from Manila to Tokyo, killing the passenger under whose seat it was planted, but the pilot managed to land the damaged 747 in Okinawa.
NEWS
July 19, 1996
PRESIDENT CLINTON was right to believe he had to say something to the American public in the wake of a frightening air disaster that raised many fears at the peak of the summer vacation travel system. One of his most important messages bears repeating: Don't jump to conclusions until the evidence is in.Another, unspoken, message is that regardless of the cause of the explosion of the TWA Boeing 747 airliner off the eastern Long Island shore on Wednesday, it is the federal government's (and Mr. Clinton's)
NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | October 25, 1992
New airplane de-icing systems resembling huge car washes may be installed in airports throughout the country if a Harford County man succeeds in marketing the devices.John R. Gaughan III, an environmental engineer who is president of Bel Air-based Catalyst and Chemical Services Inc., said the harrowing video of the 1982 Air Florida plane crash near Washington's National Airport prompted him to seek a safer method to get planes airborne in bad weather."I will never forget the scene as rescuers made attempt after attempt to pull survivors from the icy waters of the Potomac River," said the engineering graduate of Lehigh University.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 4, 2002
UBERLINGEN, Germany - Swiss air traffic officials acknowledged yesterday that a collision alarm system in their control tower was out of operation and that one of two key controllers had taken a break at the time of an in-flight collision Monday night between two jets that killed 71 people. The disclosures increased suspicion among investigators that the cause of the crash stemmed at least in part from errors on the ground and not, as Swiss officials had been implying, primarily from errors by the pilot of the Russian passenger plane.
NEWS
By Reed Johnson and Reed Johnson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 19, 2007
SAO PAULO, Brazil -- Recovery workers pulled bodies from mounds of blackened rubble yesterday as this metropolis poured out its grief and anger over a Tuesday night plane crash that many Brazilians saw as both predictable and avoidable. Caustic smoke billowed all day from the remains of this nation's worst airline disaster, which occurred when a TAM Airlines Airbus 320 carrying 186 passengers and crew slid off a rain-slick runway at Congonhas Airport, went over a major thoroughfare, crashed into a gas station and a cargo terminal, and exploded in a deadly fireball.
NEWS
By Sylvia Adcock and Sylvia Adcock,NEWSDAY | July 7, 2005
WASHINGTON - Nine years after TWA Flight 800 exploded off Long Island, the National Transportation Safety Board accused the government yesterday of dragging its feet on new requirements designed to prevent another fuel tank explosion. "We're not significantly different than we were in '96," said Dan Campbell, executive director of the NTSB, which spent four years investigating the 1996 explosion and crash of the Boeing 747, which killed 230 people. Campbell told reporters that while the Federal Aviation Administration has made significant progress in fixing problems that could cause sparks inside a fuel tank, the agency has yet to propose a rule promised in February 2004 that would prevent the buildup of flammable vapors in the first place.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 4, 2002
UBERLINGEN, Germany - Swiss air traffic officials acknowledged yesterday that a collision alarm system in their control tower was out of operation and that one of two key controllers had taken a break at the time of an in-flight collision Monday night between two jets that killed 71 people. The disclosures increased suspicion among investigators that the cause of the crash stemmed at least in part from errors on the ground and not, as Swiss officials had been implying, primarily from errors by the pilot of the Russian passenger plane.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 16, 2001
WASHINGTON - After weeks of wrangling by House and Senate negotiators, Congress is expected today to approve a compromise airline-security measure that would put federal workers at most checkpoints where passengers are screened. The compromise reached yesterday to create a new federal security system would allow airports to seek approval to switch to private contractors three years after the law takes effect. The Democrat-led Senate wanted federal workers at the checkpoints, while the Republican-majority House preferred private contractors.
NEWS
November 16, 2001
SECURITY, as defined by Webster's, includes "freedom from fear or anxiety" and "freedom from danger." One's perception; the other is reality. The perception that flying is safe suffered again with the crash of American Airlines Flight 587 -- though no connection to terrorism has been found -- and repeated inspection lapses. But there's reason to hope again, now that Congress has gotten its act together and agreed -- at least in principle -- on strong measures to screen passengers at airport checkpoints.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 2, 2001
WASHINGTON - Propelled by an intense lobbying effort led by President Bush, the House approved last night a federal takeover of airport security that would allow for the continued use of private contractors as baggage screeners instead of replacing them with federal employees. The Republican-led House voted 218-214 to reject a Senate-passed plan to put federal law enforcement officers at every airport checkpoint - a bill that would have gone straight to the White House for Bush's signature.
NEWS
By Reed Johnson and Reed Johnson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 19, 2007
SAO PAULO, Brazil -- Recovery workers pulled bodies from mounds of blackened rubble yesterday as this metropolis poured out its grief and anger over a Tuesday night plane crash that many Brazilians saw as both predictable and avoidable. Caustic smoke billowed all day from the remains of this nation's worst airline disaster, which occurred when a TAM Airlines Airbus 320 carrying 186 passengers and crew slid off a rain-slick runway at Congonhas Airport, went over a major thoroughfare, crashed into a gas station and a cargo terminal, and exploded in a deadly fireball.
NEWS
By Sylvia Adcock and Sylvia Adcock,NEWSDAY | July 7, 2005
WASHINGTON - Nine years after TWA Flight 800 exploded off Long Island, the National Transportation Safety Board accused the government yesterday of dragging its feet on new requirements designed to prevent another fuel tank explosion. "We're not significantly different than we were in '96," said Dan Campbell, executive director of the NTSB, which spent four years investigating the 1996 explosion and crash of the Boeing 747, which killed 230 people. Campbell told reporters that while the Federal Aviation Administration has made significant progress in fixing problems that could cause sparks inside a fuel tank, the agency has yet to propose a rule promised in February 2004 that would prevent the buildup of flammable vapors in the first place.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2001
With airlines still flying a reduced schedule and struggling financially, Transportation Secretary Norman Y. Mineta announced yesterday that he wants a group of private experts to recommend quickly how air travel can be made safer. Mineta named six people, including pilots and airline industry executives, to two "rapid-response" teams he wants to make a "comprehensive review" of commercial aviation security and provide recommendations within two weeks. One three-member task force will concentrate on finding ways to keep terrorists from gaining access to jetliner cockpits, while the other will focus on improving airport security.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | March 25, 1999
SPRINGFIELD, Va. -- The world's most popular commercial aircraft, the Boeing 737, has a design flaw in its rudder system that could cause the plane to roll uncontrollably and crash under certain conditions, federal safety officials ruled yesterday.While noting that such incidents are extremely rare, the National Transportation Safety Board recommended that all 737s in use and in production -- more than 3,000 worldwide -- be fitted with new systems to eliminate or overcome a potential rudder failure.
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