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HEALTH
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2010
The city's spending board voted Wednesday to approve $500,000 for a major expansion of the Maryland Shock Trauma Center, and waived air rights over a portion of the street to accommodate a new cantilevered building. Work has begun on the $160 million expansion of the hospital, which will include a new six-story building with 50 intensive- and intermediate-care beds, 10 operating rooms and a center to train health professionals to deal with traumatic injuries. The building will be capped by a new helipad, on which the Maryland State Police helicopters that transport critically injured patients can land.
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HEALTH
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2010
The city's spending board voted Wednesday to approve $500,000 for a major expansion of the Maryland Shock Trauma Center, and waived air rights over a portion of the street to accommodate a new cantilevered building. Work has begun on the $160 million expansion of the hospital, which will include a new six-story building with 50 intensive- and intermediate-care beds, 10 operating rooms and a center to train health professionals to deal with traumatic injuries. The building will be capped by a new helipad, on which the Maryland State Police helicopters that transport critically injured patients can land.
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BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2001
A pair of local developers said yesterday that they plan to buy the air rights above a city garage downtown and build 320 luxury rental apartments. The proposal by Consolidated Equities Corp. of Lutherville is the largest of several projects that developers envision in the central business district. It would also be one of the few complexes that would be new construction, rather than a conversion of an older office building. Consolidated's principals are scheduled to present preliminary plans for Water Tower Apartments to the city's Design Advisory Panel today.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2001
A pair of local developers said yesterday that they plan to buy the air rights above a city garage downtown and build 320 luxury rental apartments. The proposal by Consolidated Equities Corp. of Lutherville is the largest of several projects that developers envision in the central business district. It would also be one of the few complexes that would be new construction, rather than a conversion of an older office building. Consolidated's principals are scheduled to present preliminary plans for Water Tower Apartments to the city's Design Advisory Panel today.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | June 24, 1992
Developers of Baltimore's HarborView condominium community will reach a construction milestone today when contractors place the final steel girder in the frame of a $100 million, 27-story tower called 100 HarborView Drive.More than 600 people have been invited to the topping-off ceremony, which will be held from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. on the pierthat overlooks the construction site, just off the 1200 block of Key Highway."It's a big occasion," said Thomas N. Marudas, vice president of HarborView Properties Development Co., the developer.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | February 28, 1999
LATELY THERE'S BEEN a lot of talk about an Air Traveler's Bill of Rights. This idea got a big push in January, when a snowstorm forced some loaded planes to sit out on the Detroit airport runway for as long as eight hours, during which several passengers were eaten by wolves.This incident provoked national criticism of the airline involved, which I will not identify here other than to call it The Diametrically Opposite of Southeast Airlines. In its defense, the airline issued the following statement:"We are experiencing mechanical difficulties with our statement."
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | June 12, 1992
Real estate developer Leonard Attman won key city approval last night in his campaign to build a controversial office building that would overhang the sidewalk at the corner of Charles and Redwood streets.The city planning commission gave its blessing to a city council bill that would authorize selling Mr. Attman the air rights needed to build his proposed 29-story building.Mr. Attman has been trying to get his building approved since 1990 but has been blocked because his plans called for condemning part of Redwood Street to allow for a larger building.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | June 24, 1992
In the final session before its summer recess, the Baltimore City Council passed a bill that developer Leonard Attman needs in order to acquire the air rights above the sidewalk along the south side of Redwood Street, east of Charles Street.Mr. Attman wants to build a 29-story, 343,000-square-foot office tower called the Baltimore Financial Center at the southeast corner of that intersection and wants to use the air rights above the sidewalk in order to construct a less narrow building.The council ordinance, which needs the signature of Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, would amend the financial district urban renewal plan to permit sale of the air rights.
BUSINESS
By Bob Graham and Bob Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 10, 1998
Forest Hill offers numerous signs that it is on Harford County's fast track.Once a quiet community of large farms, Forest Hill has grown up. Where just one traffic light slowed motorists until a decade ago, the community of more than 10,000 people just north of Bel Air now boasts several traffic lights on Route 24, its main north-south artery, including the latest one at Route 24 and Osborne Parkway.A new school, Forest Lakes Elementary, opened last fall on Osborne Parkway and is already on its way to exceeding its 588-student capacity within the next four years.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | January 29, 1996
State transportation officials are embarking on a plan to turn air into cash, starting at the Owings Mills Metro station.They hope to offer the 37-acre, state-owned parking lot surrounding the subway station for development of offices, stores and even condos, while retaining ownership and leasing "air rights." The plan is a prototype for a broad, new push to make better use of transit centers while generating revenue and attracting more riders."The principle is, anywhere people congregate, either in their cars or on foot, has potential for development," said Sandy Apgar, a real estate consultant who chairs an advisory committee to the state Department of Transportation.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | February 28, 1999
LATELY THERE'S BEEN a lot of talk about an Air Traveler's Bill of Rights. This idea got a big push in January, when a snowstorm forced some loaded planes to sit out on the Detroit airport runway for as long as eight hours, during which several passengers were eaten by wolves.This incident provoked national criticism of the airline involved, which I will not identify here other than to call it The Diametrically Opposite of Southeast Airlines. In its defense, the airline issued the following statement:"We are experiencing mechanical difficulties with our statement."
BUSINESS
By Bob Graham and Bob Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 10, 1998
Forest Hill offers numerous signs that it is on Harford County's fast track.Once a quiet community of large farms, Forest Hill has grown up. Where just one traffic light slowed motorists until a decade ago, the community of more than 10,000 people just north of Bel Air now boasts several traffic lights on Route 24, its main north-south artery, including the latest one at Route 24 and Osborne Parkway.A new school, Forest Lakes Elementary, opened last fall on Osborne Parkway and is already on its way to exceeding its 588-student capacity within the next four years.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | January 29, 1996
State transportation officials are embarking on a plan to turn air into cash, starting at the Owings Mills Metro station.They hope to offer the 37-acre, state-owned parking lot surrounding the subway station for development of offices, stores and even condos, while retaining ownership and leasing "air rights." The plan is a prototype for a broad, new push to make better use of transit centers while generating revenue and attracting more riders."The principle is, anywhere people congregate, either in their cars or on foot, has potential for development," said Sandy Apgar, a real estate consultant who chairs an advisory committee to the state Department of Transportation.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | June 24, 1992
Developers of Baltimore's HarborView condominium community will reach a construction milestone today when contractors place the final steel girder in the frame of a $100 million, 27-story tower called 100 HarborView Drive.More than 600 people have been invited to the topping-off ceremony, which will be held from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. on the pierthat overlooks the construction site, just off the 1200 block of Key Highway."It's a big occasion," said Thomas N. Marudas, vice president of HarborView Properties Development Co., the developer.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | June 24, 1992
In the final session before its summer recess, the Baltimore City Council passed a bill that developer Leonard Attman needs in order to acquire the air rights above the sidewalk along the south side of Redwood Street, east of Charles Street.Mr. Attman wants to build a 29-story, 343,000-square-foot office tower called the Baltimore Financial Center at the southeast corner of that intersection and wants to use the air rights above the sidewalk in order to construct a less narrow building.The council ordinance, which needs the signature of Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, would amend the financial district urban renewal plan to permit sale of the air rights.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | June 12, 1992
Real estate developer Leonard Attman won key city approval last night in his campaign to build a controversial office building that would overhang the sidewalk at the corner of Charles and Redwood streets.The city planning commission gave its blessing to a city council bill that would authorize selling Mr. Attman the air rights needed to build his proposed 29-story building.Mr. Attman has been trying to get his building approved since 1990 but has been blocked because his plans called for condemning part of Redwood Street to allow for a larger building.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | May 15, 1993
State officials planning a $150 million addition to Baltimore's Convention Center have given up on the idea of building a 1,000-room hotel above it.Bruce Hoffman, executive director of the Maryland Stadium Authority, said at a meeting of Baltimore's Architectural Review Board yesterday that building a hotel in the air rights above the addition has been deemed unworkable and that the developers are now considering other locations nearby."
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | March 6, 1992
The idea of building a 1,000-room hotel atop the proposed expansion to Baltimore's Convention Center has been greeted with skepticism by members of the city's Architectural Review Board, who strongly recommended that the developers consider another site for the hotel.In their first presentation to the city-paid design panel, architects for the $150 million Convention Center expansion said yesterday they have determined it is physically possible to build a hotel above the addition -- meaning the hotel could be built so that its supporting structure would not interfere with the column-free spaces needed below for large conventions.
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