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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2013
Mostly cloudy skies and temperatures in the 40s and 50s are forecast in the Baltimore area Tuesday. Overnight lows were forecast from the mid-30s in the suburbs to the lower 40s downtown. Temperatures were expected to rise to the lower 50s in the afternoon, dropping back to the upper 30s overnight into Wednesday. For the second day in a row, the Maryland Department of the Environment issued a Code Orange air quality alert for the central and western parts of the state, meaning sensitive populations should limit their time spent outside.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
A Code Orange air quality alert, meaning conditions are unhealthy for sensitive groups, is in effect for much of Maryland on Monday, a relatively rare occurrence outside of the summer months. The alert is because of warming temperatures and a high pressure system that is making the air stagnant over the region, according to the Maryland Department of the Environment. That is causing fine particles to build in the air. That is different than the common air quality alerts issued during summer months, which are most often linked to high levels of ozone pollution, which can be exacerbated by hot weather.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
Mold has closed a child care center at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and a floor of the McKeldin Library at the University of Maryland, College Park. The UMBC child care facility, operated by the Y of Central Maryland, shuttered Wednesday night because of a mold problem caused by water leaking between walls, officials said, leaving dozens of families without child care. "We arrived at the decision to close with the safety of the children in mind, and we are very sorry for the impact it will have on the families affected," Lynne Schaefer, vice president for finance and administration, said in an email to the university community Thursday.
NEWS
July 25, 2013
We are in the midst of another sweltering heat wave in the East with temperatures soaring in the mid-to-upper-90's and the heat index approaching 110 degrees. Alarming as these heat waves may be, they are projected to become the norm in the coming decades with the repercussions from climate change becoming more commonplace. Such extreme temperatures can worsen our air quality and are hazardous for children, the elderly, and those with heart and lung conditions. From a public health perspective, we have a duty to protect current and future generations from dirty air and pollutive forms of energy.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
Temperatures rose to the mid-90s across the Baltimore area -- with heat indices approaching 110 degrees in some areas -- Thursday afternoon as much of the nation bakes under a heat wave. Little cooling came overnight in the city, with an early morning low of 83 degrees downtown. Dew points are in the lower- to mid-70s, making the air feel thick and exacerbating the heat as well as air pollution. Temperatures surged as high as 97 degrees at the Inner Harbor in the afternoon -- with a heat index up to 111 degrees.  Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport  reached and 95 degrees with a heat index of 103 degrees.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2013
4:41 p.m. update: The Maryland Department of the Environment has extended its "Code Orange" air quality alert through Thursday evening. Children, the elderly, people with asthma and other sensitive groups are urged to avoid strenuous activity or exercise outdoors. 3:17 p.m. update: Today has set another new mark for hottest day of 2013 in Baltimore, with BWI at 96 degrees as of 3 p.m. With humidity, it feels like 100 degrees there. At the Inner Harbor, it feels like 103 degrees with an air temperature of 98 degrees.
NEWS
By Scott Dance and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2013
4:46 p.m. update: The Maryland Department of the Environment has issued an air quality alert across Central Maryland for Wednesday, with "Code Orange" conditions. Code Orange indicates air pollution levels unhealthy for sensitive populations, including children, the elderly and those with certain health conditions such as asthma. 3:10 p.m. update: The heat advisory has been canceled, with lower than expected humidity in the air, but temperatures remain high in the mid-90s around the region.
NEWS
June 22, 2013
In Timothy Wheeler's article ("O'Malley lobbies EPA on fuel rule," June 16), readers are left with the wrong impression about why Gov. Martin O'Malley called the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on behalf of the Port of Baltimore. Governor O'Malley was asking the EPA to review a draft proposal by Carnival to spend $200 million to install pollution scrubbers on ships, which would allow the cruise line to meet the new air quality requirements. The reason for the request? Carnival was finalizing its 2014-2015 cruising schedule and needed an answer from the EPA immediately on their proposal to use this new technology to determine if they could continue offering cruises from Baltimore.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley has interceded with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on behalf of Carnival Cruise Lines after the company threatened to pull its business from Baltimore over a pending air-quality regulation that would require large, ocean-going ships to burn cleaner fuel. O'Malley spoke twice with Bob Perciasepe, acting EPA administrator, since late May to support Carnival's request for what the governor's press secretary called a waiver from the agency's cleaner-fuel mandate.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
Temperatures are expected to reach into the low 90s across the Baltimore region on Friday as warnings about poor air quality continue, according to the National Weather Service. At 2:54 p.m., the temperature at BWI was 89. Downtown at the Maryland Science Center it was 95. A Code Orange air quality alert is in place throughout the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan region, which means sensitive or unhealthy people may "experience health problems due to air pollution," namely ozone, the weather service said.
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