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Air Quality

NEWS
June 22, 2013
In Timothy Wheeler's article ("O'Malley lobbies EPA on fuel rule," June 16), readers are left with the wrong impression about why Gov. Martin O'Malley called the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on behalf of the Port of Baltimore. Governor O'Malley was asking the EPA to review a draft proposal by Carnival to spend $200 million to install pollution scrubbers on ships, which would allow the cruise line to meet the new air quality requirements. The reason for the request? Carnival was finalizing its 2014-2015 cruising schedule and needed an answer from the EPA immediately on their proposal to use this new technology to determine if they could continue offering cruises from Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley has interceded with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on behalf of Carnival Cruise Lines after the company threatened to pull its business from Baltimore over a pending air-quality regulation that would require large, ocean-going ships to burn cleaner fuel. O'Malley spoke twice with Bob Perciasepe, acting EPA administrator, since late May to support Carnival's request for what the governor's press secretary called a waiver from the agency's cleaner-fuel mandate.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
Temperatures are expected to reach into the low 90s across the Baltimore region on Friday as warnings about poor air quality continue, according to the National Weather Service. At 2:54 p.m., the temperature at BWI was 89. Downtown at the Maryland Science Center it was 95. A Code Orange air quality alert is in place throughout the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan region, which means sensitive or unhealthy people may "experience health problems due to air pollution," namely ozone, the weather service said.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
As the temperature climbs this week, air quality is expected to deteriorate to conditions unhealthy for many people, according to forecasts. "Code Orange" level air quality is expected Thursday and Friday, according to data reported by the Maryland Department of the Environment to Washington-based Clean Air Partners. Forecasts call for sunny skies with temperatures in the upper 80s on Thursday, the National Weather Service said. Overnight temperatures will drop to the mid-60s and low-70s in the region, but will rise again under sunny skies on Friday to the lower 90s. As of 4:54 p.m., it was 88 at BWI. Temperatures appeared to peak at 91 around 2 p.m. Temperatures are expected to remain high through the weekend.
HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
Spring stirs pollen, and also dust - high-flying dust that's blown thousands of miles to reach North America in greater amounts than scientists have known before, with potential impact on the climate and air quality. Mineral dust rises from dry expanses in Asia, Africa and the Middle East, rides upper atmospheric winds for days across the Pacific Ocean to the West Coast of the United States and beyond. More than two miles up, it can reach Maryland, where scientists at College Park, Greenbelt and Catonsville have been tracking its global travels with satellite-based instruments in a way they say is more accurate and covers a longer period of time than previous studies.
NEWS
By Georges Benjamin | April 10, 2013
On Thursday, the U.S. Senate will hold a confirmation hearing on Gina McCarthy, President Barack Obama's nominee to lead the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Over her decades of public service, Ms. McCarthy has demonstrated a strong commitment to protecting public health with pragmatic solutions to our pollution challenges. In short, she has proved that she is a true public health champion. While Ms. McCarthy's most high-profile accomplishments came from her work strengthening and modernizing historic clean air standards to ensure that Americans will be able to breathe easier over the long term, she has dedicated her entire career to keeping kids safe from chemicals, ensuring we have clean and safe drinking water, and tackling the environmental health issues that really matter.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | August 7, 2012
Despite it being one of the hottest summers on record in Baltimore, "code red" air pollution days are at their lowest levels since 2009.  There has been only one "code red" day, considered unhealthy for everyone -- June 29, the day intense heat fueled the deadly derecho storm. That is according to AirNow, an air-quality website maintained by a handful of federal government agencies. There have been 14 days with "code orange" conditions in at least part of the Baltimore area so far this summer.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 29, 2012
With temperatures predicted to top 100 degrees today and stay in the high 90s into next week, air-quality forecasters are warning that smog across much of Maryland likely will reach unhealthful levels for children, older adults and anyone with breathing or heart problems. Smog, or ground-level ozone pollution, is expected to hit "Code Orange" levels through Sunday in the Baltimore metropolitan area, according to Clean Air Partners , which publishes air-quality forecasts prepared for the Maryland Department of the Environment and the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments.
NEWS
By Nick Cafferky, Colin Campbell and Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2012
Temperature gauges approached triple digits Wednesday on the first day of summer, packing county pools, opening cooling centers and setting the stage for the season of swelter. Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport saw a high of 98 degrees around 3 p.m., missing the record of 100 set in 1931. With high humidity, the heat index topped 100 across the Baltimore area. The normal high for this time of year is 85 degrees. Chances for a record remain Thursday.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | June 11, 2012
Humidity is intense in some parts of Maryland, and it is expected to continue for a few days. Summer weather is upon us. Martin State Airport in Middle River posted a dew point of 72 degrees as of 9:45 a.m., beyond the normal mugginess of a hot Baltimore day. The air is thick, wet and heavy there. In Annapolis, the dew point was 68 degrees by 10 a.m., while BWI Marshall Airport was at 64 degrees. With dew points, anything above 60 degrees is uncomfortable, while getting above 70 degrees is downright unbearable.
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