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By Jeffrey Record | October 5, 1990
SECRETARY of Defense Dick Cheney had excellent reasons for cashiering the Air Force chief of staff, Gen. Michael J. Dugan.The general had blabbed on the record in great detail about high-level deliberations on how best to wage war against Iraq, should war come. He discussed strategy and listed specific targets; he provided information about Iraqi forces; he revealed that Israel is supplying special missiles for Air Force B-52 bombers deployed in the Persian Gulf region.The general also declared, in a remark suggesting profound ignorance of the realities of limited war, that ''I don't expect to be concerned'' about political constraints upon air operations.
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NEWS
October 12, 2014
Former Defense Secretary Leon Panetta has criticized President Barack Obama as a person who often "avoids the battle" and says Mr. Obama's efforts have been to "steer the country away from costly and ineffective wars. " I say thank God for a return to sanity. Dwight D. Eisenhower, a war hero, commanding general and former president of the United States, warned us more than 60 years ago to beware the danger of the military industrial complex. In 1985, Richard Barnet, founder of the Institute for Policy Studies, remarked that "though the U.S came out of WWII the most powerful nation on earth, perhaps, briefly, the paramount nation of all times, it has not won a decisive military victory since 1945 despite trillions spent on the military and the frequent engagement of its forces.
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NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON | February 27, 1991
Washington -- If Maj. Alexander P. de Seversky were here today, I would gladly apologize. In his absence, I take more pleasure in writing this ''I was wrong'' column than in any such mea culpa of the past.Though there will be more casualties, it appears that our side has won the Persian Gulf war -- and what did it, more than anything else, was air power. Not that the massive Allied ground force was unnecessary; not that we can now disband our armored divisions and Marine expeditionary brigades.
NEWS
April 30, 2013
Having vowed that any use of chemical weapons by Syria would cross a U.S. "red line" and provoke a strong American response "with enormous consequences," President Barack Obama now finds himself under increasing pressure to act, following reports by U.S. and foreign intelligence agencies that the regime of President Bashar Assad used deadly sarin gas against opponents last year. The problem for Mr. Obama is that the military options for enforcing his promise range from bad to very bad - while the risks of doing nothing may be even worse.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2010
The offensive makeover the Ravens underwent this past offseason yielded a pair of established wide receivers in Anquan Boldin and Donte' Stallworth and the rookie tight end duo of Ed Dickson and Dennis Pitta. But if you poll the team's stable of running backs, the Ravens are still a run-based offense. "I still think it's a major part because if we don't establish the run, we'll never establish the passing game," tailback Willis McGahee said. "I don't care who we have out there, you need the running game to help out the passing game.
NEWS
By JEFFREY RECORD | January 30, 1991
Initial hopes that the war against Iraq would be relatively short and cheap, courtesy of overwhelming U.S. and allied air power, evaporated within days of its beginning. Notwithstanding spectacular gun-camera videos and early claims to the virtual destruction of Saddam Hussein's command-and-control system and his nuclear- and chemical-weapons facilities, the tone of official briefings became decidedly more sober and cautionary by the war's second week.Iraq's economy and military machine are exceptionally vulnerable American air power.
NEWS
By ANDREW BARD SCHMOOKLER | May 6, 1993
Silver Spring -- Unless the carnage in Bosnia now stops, the world community should bring force to bear: a U.N.-sanctioned, multi- national use of air power.Some object that air power alone will not work. By ''work'' they mean compel the Serbs to cease their aggression and atrocities and to abide by the Vance-Owen plan. Whether air strikes will force Serbian compliance is an open question (although the way the Serbs have moderated their position every time the threat of international force has become more credible -- as in last weekend's signing of the peace accords -- affords some grounds for hope)
NEWS
By Charles W. Corddry and Charles W. Corddry,Washington Bureau | June 23, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The United States must base its future defense strategy on dominant air power, built up if necessary at the expense of reduced land and sea forces, according to a new study for the Pentagon made public yesterday.Air forces are uniquely qualified to wage the sorts of major regional conflicts that may confront the United States and its allies in the post-Cold War era, the RAND report said.The California-based think tank described a military technological revolution that will enable air power to move with blinding swiftness, even by the standards of the 1991 Persian Gulf war. It contended, for example:"By the turn of the century, if provided with available technology, U.S. air power will be capable of stopping an attack force of over 8,000 armored vehicles and 1,000 aircraft in little more than a week."
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman LTC and Dan Fesperman LTC,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 16, 1991
WASHINGTON -- By destroying bridges, bunkers and tanks by the thousands before the ground offensive began, allied air forces virtually defeated the Iraqi army by themselves, the U.S. Air Force chief of staff concluded yesterday.Gen. Merrill A. "Tony" McPeak told reporters at the Pentagon, "This is the first time in history that a full army has been defeated by air power."The victory in the air was assured within the first few hours after bombing began the morning of Jan. 17, he said, thanks to precision knockouts of Iraqi anti-aircraft radar and the bonus element of "tactical surprise."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 22, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration is now telling the Europeans that it is willing to use air power to protect U.N. peacekeeping forces guarding safe areas for Muslims in Bosnia. But President Clinton reiterated his opposition to any American soldiers participating on the ground while the war continues, even as part of the peacekeeping effort.Secretary of State Warren M. Christopher informed the Europeans of the shift in the American position in meetings with Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev of Russia yesterday and with Foreign Secretary Douglas Hurd of Britain yesterday, senior European officials said.
NEWS
June 8, 2012
Bashar Assad, Syria's deplorable tyrant who has slaughtered children and women in his brutal grab for power, is proving himself to be worse than most Middle East dictators. But political hawks and others who would have the U.S. intervene in his messy massacre, salivate recklessly that somehow the might of the U.S. war machine can reduce him to cinders. As Iraq and Afghanistan have shown, not so simple or easy is the obliteration of theocracies and authoritarian regimes. In Syria, Iran is fighting a proxy war against the rebels through Assad.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2010
The offensive makeover the Ravens underwent this past offseason yielded a pair of established wide receivers in Anquan Boldin and Donte' Stallworth and the rookie tight end duo of Ed Dickson and Dennis Pitta. But if you poll the team's stable of running backs, the Ravens are still a run-based offense. "I still think it's a major part because if we don't establish the run, we'll never establish the passing game," tailback Willis McGahee said. "I don't care who we have out there, you need the running game to help out the passing game.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | May 25, 2008
Relaxing with his feet propped up in his enclosed patio, Eastern Shore waterman Paul Abey hears chirping martins and lapping bay waves. He also hears a low-pitched whir. "It's a good sound," Abey said of the hum coming from blades spinning atop a 45-foot tower on the edge of his front lawn. "I've cussed the wind all my life," the Green Point crabber added, "but now I don't mind." That's because he knows that, with every swish of his windmill, he's saving money. His step away from traditional power sources reflects an increasing interest nationwide in what are known as small wind energy systems.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 8, 2000
WASHINGTON - Assured that the federal government would not outlaw the gasoline-powered auto or shut down the nation's factories in order to clean up the air, the Supreme Court appeared likely yesterday to uphold broad federal authority to set strict air quality standards. After a two-hour hearing, the Environmental Protection Agency seemed on its way to withstanding the most serious constitutional challenge yet to its powers to monitor the cleanliness of air and water, especially its authority over the pollutants smog and soot.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 12, 1999
WHITEMAN AIR FORCE BASE, Mo. -- President Clinton came to the home of the B-2 stealth bomber to extol American air power yesterday, but he devoted as much of his speech to praising American-style race relations, asserting that NATO's victory in Kosovo had been one of ethnic diversity over "ethnic cleansing."Clinton told a crowd of about 3,000 Air Force personnel and their families, gathered in a cavernous hangar, that their example was helping to refute the idea that "a country can only be great with everybody just like everybody else."
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | June 7, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Ah, peace, it's wonderful! We flew only 610 bombing sorties over Yugoslavia on the night after hopeful declarations around the world that the police action, or whatever we call it, was over, over there.Over for us, I mean, after more than 30,000 bombing runs. But a new phase in the fighting between the Kosovars and the Serbs has only just begun. If the peace agreement holds and an international peace-keeping force is installed in Kosovo, then begins the countdown to the day the Kosovo Liberation Army opens guerrilla warfare against the peace-keepers to drive them out in the name of an independent Kosovo and a Greater Albania.
NEWS
August 1, 1993
Bosnia's political and military leaders remain divided over a peace agreement reached Friday in GENEVA that would split the country into a loose federation of three ethnic republics, a member of the collective presidency said.Despite a cease-fire agreement, fierce fighting was reported in many areas. The fighting was reported most intense at BRCKO, ZAVIDOVICI, MAGLAJ, TESANJ and OLOVO, where Serbian commanders are seeking to squeeze or eliminate pockets of Bosnian army control.At Washington's request, NATO officials will meet in BRUSSELS, Belgium, tomorrow to discuss the use of air power in Bosnia.
NEWS
By Gallup Organization | February 13, 1991
PRINCETON, N.J. -- As President Bush and his advisers focus on when to begin a ground offensive in the Persian Gulf war, Americans strongly favor delaying ground action by continuing to rely on air power to do the job.Nevertheless, according to the most recent Gallup Poll, most Americans thought the ground war would start soon, most continued to support Mr. Bush and U.S. involvement, and a majority felt the war should continue until Iraqi President Saddam...
NEWS
June 17, 1998
THE KOSOVO problem is not solved. Just possibly, the war between Albanian rebels and Serbian forces will abate. If so, credit would go to a strange alliance between the United States and Russia, based on their open disagreements.Yugoslavia's President Slobodan Milosevic reneged on negotiating with Ibrahim Rugova, the elected leader of the Albanian majority in Kosovo province. As a result, the Kosovo Liberation Army sprang up, launching rebellion with weapons procured across the border in Albania.
NEWS
By George F. Will | February 12, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Saddam Hussein's promises are made of piecrust, so why use force to produce more of them? This question arises because the United States lacks a convincing connection between its political objective and the military assets -- including national will -- it has to achieve it.Defense Secretary William S. Cohen recently said air attacks would be "directed toward limiting, curtailing, really preventing him from reconstituting his capability in...
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