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September 21, 2004
Joseph Thomas Ellis, retired branch manager of an air filter firm, died of complications from cancer and Alzheimer's disease Thursday at his Timonium home. He was 77. Born in Baltimore and raised in Ednor Gardens, he was a 1945 graduate of Loyola High School, where he played varsity football. He enlisted in the Navy, and while in the service attended Georgia Tech and Emory University, and earned a degree from Loyola College. He then designed, sold and oversaw the installation of heating, air conditioning and pollution control systems in schools, hospitals and office buildings.
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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose | July 10, 2005
MEL COLWELL of Baltimore gave up road trips to the countryside about a year ago when gas prices grew too steep. And though the 83-year-old retired steelworker says he has always driven the speed limit, he has begun to lighten up on the pedal to conserve fuel. Colwell used to spend less than $20 to fill up his '92 Pontiac Grand Am. Last week, he paid $29 for less than 13 gallons - not even a full tank. Pointing to the pump, Colwell predicted Americans haven't seen the worst of the rising gas prices.
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FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 20, 1995
The other night, while watching fourth-graders perform "Peter Pan," I tried to let my mind wander, as the script suggested, into the land of the imagination. But instead of imagination, all I could think of was ventilation.It was sweltering. A few nights earlier, the weather had been cool and breezy. But shortly before I trekked to a school hall to watch my offspring perform -- a trip replicated at this time of year by countless other parents around the state -- the heavy humidity moved in.After weathering many springs in Maryland I am convinced that all you have do is mention the words "school play" or "graduation" and a storm front loaded with rain moves in.The play was terrific.
NEWS
September 21, 2004
Joseph Thomas Ellis, retired branch manager of an air filter firm, died of complications from cancer and Alzheimer's disease Thursday at his Timonium home. He was 77. Born in Baltimore and raised in Ednor Gardens, he was a 1945 graduate of Loyola High School, where he played varsity football. He enlisted in the Navy, and while in the service attended Georgia Tech and Emory University, and earned a degree from Loyola College. He then designed, sold and oversaw the installation of heating, air conditioning and pollution control systems in schools, hospitals and office buildings.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose | July 10, 2005
MEL COLWELL of Baltimore gave up road trips to the countryside about a year ago when gas prices grew too steep. And though the 83-year-old retired steelworker says he has always driven the speed limit, he has begun to lighten up on the pedal to conserve fuel. Colwell used to spend less than $20 to fill up his '92 Pontiac Grand Am. Last week, he paid $29 for less than 13 gallons - not even a full tank. Pointing to the pump, Colwell predicted Americans haven't seen the worst of the rising gas prices.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D. and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D.,King Features Syndicate | September 5, 1995
We're a family of snifflers and sneezers. Hay fever season is not a pretty sight. But we're preparing by changing filters and stocking up on effective medications.Hay fever is badly named, because it has nothing to do with hay and you don't run a fever. Instead, you just sneeze your nose red in response to ragweed pollen. For some folks, itchy red eyes are an additional torment.We are not alone. Over the next month millions will be miserable as pollen drifts invisibly throughout the environment.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | September 8, 1996
After years of neglect, the air-filtration system at the long-dormant Monument Street Landfill in East Baltimore has been replaced, and the city has begun monitoring air and water near the landfill, officials said.The action came after the Maryland Department of Environment threatened the city last month with unspecified "enforcement action" if it did not replace carbon canisters used to treat methane and other gases rising from the landfill within 15 days.The 19 canisters were replaced between Aug. 21 and Aug. 23, the Department of Public Works said.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose | June 2, 2011
Gas prices have subsided a bit, but fuel can still eat up a big part of your budget. Jack Gillis, author of The Car Book, offers some ways to trim gas bills. Among them: —    Use a gentle foot on the gas pedal. By not accelerating and decelerating like a jack rabbit, you can save 68 cents per gallon. Similarly, for every 5 miles per hour your reduce your highway speed, you reduce fuel consumption by 7 percent. Dropping from 70 mph to 65 mph will save 27 cents a gallon.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
If a tree falls in a Maryland forest, does anyone know its value? State Forester Steve Koehn threw back his head and laughed when asked that question. And then he jumped at the chance to shed some light on what he calls one of Maryland's best-kept secrets. "Forest products are a $4 billion-a-year industry in Maryland," he said. "For comparison, seafood is a $950 million industry. " Koehn stood on a gentle slope in the middle of a towering stand of poplar trees, their golden leaves electrified by a bright fall sun. Eighteen months ago, loggers harvested that private plot in western Baltimore County, removing about half of the trees.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Evening Sun Staff | September 25, 1990
Under a plea-bargain agreement, alleged drug kingpin Robert Bruce Dowdy 3rd has pleaded guilty to racketeering and tax evasion and federal prosecutors dropped several drug charges and one of money-laundering.Judge Frank A. Kaufman set sentencing for Dec. 13 after accepting Dowdy's plea yesterday. The maximum sentence Dowdy could receive is 21 years in jail and fines totaling $2.5 million.Dowdy, 36, of the 1700 block of Winford Road in northeast Baltimore, distributed wholesale quantities of heroin to local dealers, according to Assistant U.S. Attorney Katharine J. Armentrout.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | September 8, 1996
After years of neglect, the air-filtration system at the long-dormant Monument Street Landfill in East Baltimore has been replaced, and the city has begun monitoring air and water near the landfill, officials said.The action came after the Maryland Department of Environment threatened the city last month with unspecified "enforcement action" if it did not replace carbon canisters used to treat methane and other gases rising from the landfill within 15 days.The 19 canisters were replaced between Aug. 21 and Aug. 23, the Department of Public Works said.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D. and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D.,King Features Syndicate | September 5, 1995
We're a family of snifflers and sneezers. Hay fever season is not a pretty sight. But we're preparing by changing filters and stocking up on effective medications.Hay fever is badly named, because it has nothing to do with hay and you don't run a fever. Instead, you just sneeze your nose red in response to ragweed pollen. For some folks, itchy red eyes are an additional torment.We are not alone. Over the next month millions will be miserable as pollen drifts invisibly throughout the environment.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 20, 1995
The other night, while watching fourth-graders perform "Peter Pan," I tried to let my mind wander, as the script suggested, into the land of the imagination. But instead of imagination, all I could think of was ventilation.It was sweltering. A few nights earlier, the weather had been cool and breezy. But shortly before I trekked to a school hall to watch my offspring perform -- a trip replicated at this time of year by countless other parents around the state -- the heavy humidity moved in.After weathering many springs in Maryland I am convinced that all you have do is mention the words "school play" or "graduation" and a storm front loaded with rain moves in.The play was terrific.
TRAVEL
By NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE | January 22, 2006
My husband and I often get colds and respiratory infections on vacations. Some say the reason for this is that airlines save fuel by minimizing the amount of fresh air circulated through cabins. Is there any standard for fresh air circulated during a flight? Almost everyone who falls sick after flying wonders whether a coughing, sneezing fellow passenger is to blame. The answer, experts say, may be yes - but the conducting culprit is not recirculated air; it's proximity, bad luck and poor hand-washing, the same elements to blame for virus transmission on the ground.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | May 12, 2011
So,it sounds like there's a respite in store for those who have been struggling with rising gas prices , according to Mike Dresser over at Getting There. While the average price around the state has exceeded $4 a gallon, it's not expected to stay there, Dresser reported. Whether it will drop by Memorial Day remains to be seen, but hopefully this summer won't be as painful for drivers as it has been in the past. But regardless of whether gas prices are over or under $4 per gallon, it makes good fiscal sense to improve the fuel economy of our vehicles.
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