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Air Conditioning

EXPLORE
April 4, 2012
Laurel police report felonies, arrests and property crimes. Prince George's County police report violent crimes and property crimes. Howard County police report major crimes, break-ins and car thefts. City of Laurel Washington Boulevard, 500 block, March 27. Bicycle and speed meter stolen from pickup truck. Lafayette Avenue, 100 block, March 26. Copper pipes stolen from air conditioning units outside building. Montrose Avenue, 300 block, March 26. Lockers broken into at LA Fitness.
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NEWS
February 25, 2012
Your recent editorial "Repairing city schools" (Feb. 18) can only have been written by someone who hasn't spent much time in the city's public schools recently. I have, and I can tell you that there are students who avoid going to the bathroom all day because the toilets won't flush or the stall doors are missing, and there are teachers who have lost a decade's worth of materials to flooding caused by leaking roofs. If you were to set foot inside their schools, would you tell them that certain "details" need to be worked out before we can start raising the money to fix their buildings?
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2011
State Comptroller Peter Franchot criticized Baltimore County leaders Wednesday for failing to use $7 million in school construction funds to air-condition schools. Franchot, who welcomed a group of Middleborough Elementary children and their parents to Annapolis to testify before the Board of Public Works, asked the board to force the county to spend at least half of the money, which has come from the state alcohol tax, on air-conditioning. But Gov. Martin O'Malley and Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp, the other board members, said that while they were sympathetic to the pleas from children and parents, they would not interfere with local decisions on school construction spending.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2011
Benjamin W. "Ben" Cumming III, who had worked as a heating and air conditioning installer, died Tuesday from complications of pneumonia at his Glen Rock, Pa., home. He was 45. The son of an Air Force officer and a dental assistant, Mr. Cumming was born in Aurora, Colo., and moved with his family to Kingsville in 1967. He was a 1983 graduate of Perry Hall High School and began working as a heating and air conditioning installer. He had worked for Ridge Heating and Air Conditioning as a teenager and later for Martin J. Braun before starting his own heating and air conditioning business.
EXPLORE
By Kathy Hudson | August 5, 2011
Thursday night the temperature on our thermometer said 76 degrees. We turned off the air-conditioning, raised the windows and turned on the small box fan that sat, facing out, in a third-floor window. That little fan drew cool air through the house all night long.   Having windows open felt different. The air currents were different. I keep a fan running in my bedroom for circulation even when the air-conditioning runs. The added breeze from the front window cooled me down, so I slept under a cotton blanket for the first night in more than a month.
NEWS
July 26, 2011
My husband and I have taken part in BGE's PeakRewards program for three years and never experienced an interruption of our air-conditioning until Friday. At first we thought that our thermostat was faulty or the air-conditioner wasn't working. The unit had been off for more than an hour. The thermostat was set at 78 degrees, and it was registering 88 in the room. Then my sister-in-law called to say her air-conditioning wasn't working either. That's when I realized perhaps BGE had put PeakRewards into effect.
EXPLORE
By Kathy Hudson | July 26, 2011
On Friday when temperatures soared into the 100's, some with air conditioning lost it for more than eight hours.  They had enrolled in BGE's PeakRewards program and thought they were doing a good thing for the environment and for their pocketbooks.   By having a special switch on the air-conditioning compressor, the homeowner allows the utility company to cut off the unit when demand is very high. This happened on Friday and a snafu in the electronics made it so that many customers could not override the cutoff.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | July 26, 2011
Baltimore Gas and Electric runs one of the most aggressive programs in the country to shut down customers' air conditioners on days when electricity is scarce and the grid is stressed. BGE households found out how aggressive on Friday. On one of the hottest days in recorded Baltimore history, 72,000 residences were without air conditioning for at least six hours. BGE also used its radio-controlled switches to partially cut air conditioning for an additional 278,000 homes. Many customers said they were entirely without air conditioning from late morning until after 8 p.m. on a day when the official temperature hit 106 and the air pollution index blew past the "unhealthy for certain groups" zone and into "unhealthy for everybody" territory.
NEWS
By Rebekah Brown, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2011
The Broadway Court Senior Life building in East Baltimore advertises being "in the heart of Baltimore. " Residents who had been without air conditioning from Friday through Monday afternoon said that it was like living "in the heat of Baltimore. " According to Armerlous Givens, the air conditioning was fixed "while the media was here" and came back on "around 2 or 3 [p.m.]. Givens, 66, said that it had been fixed last week as well and stopped working within a few hours. "We have all had a terrible time," Givens said Monday night.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2011
Baltimore Gas and Electric is reviewing its PeakRewards program, officials said Sunday, after emergency activation of the energy-saving program turned off air conditioning for hours during the hottest part of Friday, angering customers. The utility will try to avoid another systemwide emergency activation through Saturday, officials said, despite forecasts calling for temperatures to reach 100 degrees or higher Friday and Saturday. "Barring anything unforeseen related to the electricity system or the weather, we are not expecting to go to another emergency event," said BGE spokeswoman Linda J. Foy. Friday's intense heat led to the first "emergency event" in the four-year-old program, lasting about six hours.
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