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Air Conditioning

NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | November 12, 1992
Mount Airy Elementary is not the only school in Carroll County with no air conditioning, but its third story is one of the hottest spots in the system, said Lester Surber, supervisor of school facilities.At least two county commissioners are a bit cool on the idea of spending $492,000 to air-condition the school."I don't know how to respond to that," said Commissioner President Donald I. Dell, who was surprised to learn yesterday that the Board of Education may ask for an additional $257,000 on Monday to pay for air conditioning.
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NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | April 22, 1993
Mount Airy Elementary School may have to sweat out another school year without air conditioning, unless officials find a way to raise the remaining $250,000 needed to install it.The project was among several that did not get money for fiscal 1993-1994 from the county commissioners because of more pressing needs."
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | November 1, 1993
When July rolls around and sweat rolls off people's brows, Charles Colson's alumni become wanted men and women.They know how to install and repair air-conditioning units."
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie & Randy Johnson | August 17, 1997
IF YOU live in a house that's more than 50 years old, you can pretty much bet its builder never envisioned air conditioning. Thus you may discover, as Karol did in her 85-year-old bungalow, that there's no way to retrofit central air conditioning without ruining some charming architectural feature.But, you should also discover, the builders did think of some ways to keep the house cooler in hot weather. You just have to help the house take advantage of them. Here are some suggestions for weathering the heat:Don't let the heat build up in the first place.
BUSINESS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | July 22, 1991
On a sweltering day in Baltimore during some summer in the future, you may find your wastebasket cooling your office.Not literally, of course. But a local company is exploring the feasibility of installing massive air conditioners to cool clusters of downtown buildings with the energy produced by burning trash.Some of the city's electricity, and thus air conditioning, is already provided by a waste-burning generator. But Baltimore Thermal Energy Corp., the company that now provides steam to hundreds of downtown buildings for heating and other uses, is talking with potential customers about a "district cooling system" that would be powered mostly by burning garbage.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Katherine Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2010
With Baltimore headed for a second straight day of triple-digit temperatures, health authorities ordered that all residents be moved from a Baltimore nursing home plagued with air conditioning problems. The 150 residents of Ravenwood Nursing and Rehabilitation Center on West Franklin Street are being transported to new locations, said David Paulson, communications director for Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. About 40 residents were moved Tuesday — after a resident called 911 to report stifling temperatures — but conditions did not improve markedly, so officials called for the broader relocation in the pre-dawn hours Wednesday.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie and Ron Nodine | May 2, 1999
IF YOU LIVE in a part of the country where spring is about 10 minutes long, and then summer comes roaring in, you may already have started thinking about the approaching air conditioning season.If you live in an old house, you may also already know that retrofitting can be a problem.However, you do have a number of options.The easiest solution is to simply install window units. The advantage is that they are economical to use: You cool only the room you want, and only when you want it.The disadvantages are that they are unsightly from the outside, and hard to seal against the weather so they usually need to be removed and reinstalled each season.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2012
The parent company of Harborside Nursing & Rehabilitation Center in Baltimore, which faced state sanctions for air-conditioning failures more than two years ago, has filed for reorganization under Chapter 11 bankruptcy, according to court documents. Ravenwood Healthcare Inc., based in Baton Rouge, La., listed $10 million to $50 million in liabilities and the same amount of assets, according to documents filed late last week with the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in the Middle District of Louisiana.
NEWS
June 28, 1998
IT SOUNDS pretty incredible now. But just decades ago, Baltimoreans routinely beat the summer heat by sleeping outside in the comparative coolness of public parks. Whole families felt safe doing so, escaping their sweltering rowhouses with cots and linens.Home air conditioners have been common in Maryland for about 40 years -- enough time to lose many traditions of keeping cool. Local amusement parks and once plentiful Chesapeake Bay beach resorts are long gone. So are sleeping porches and colorful awnings that kept the sun from scorching living spaces.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2002
Calling the heat in the city's Women's Detention Center "sickening," Baltimore District Judge Charlotte M. Cooksey excoriated jail officials at a hearing last night and demanded to know the health status of all its inmates to determine whether temperatures at the facility would aggravate any medical conditions. "I am extremely concerned about the health of the people confined in that setting," Cooksey said of the 576 held at the jail that is overseen by the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services.
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