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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2010
MARC train 538 from Washington shut down Monday evening, leaving passengers stranded in the train for about two hours. MTA spokesman Terry Owens said the train, which leaves Washington at 6:13 p.m., "basically shut down." "We don't know why it shut down," Owens said. "We assume it's weather related, but we don't know." The train stopped just shy of New Carrolton on its way to Perryville. He said that train officials gave out water on some cars. "We carry water on trains in the summer and if there is an issue we had water out."
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NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2010
Keshia Webb couldn't understand why her utility bill was nearly $250 a month for her small Columbia townhouse. "I was always asking why my utility bill is so high," said Webb, 39, who has lived in the Columbia Housing Corp. unit off Harper's Farm Road since 2005. Her home, which she shares with her 9-year-old daughter, has a living room and kitchen on the first floor, and two bedrooms and a small bathroom on the second. A new furnace, water heater, air conditioning unit and newly sealed cracks and crevices in her attic, part of a weatherization makeover, are likely to help.
BUSINESS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Sun Staff Writer | November 23, 1994
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. said yesterday it will buy one of Maryland's biggest air-conditioning contractors and become the first utility in the United States to have its own employees sell, install and upgrade the heat pumps, furnaces and cooling equipment that use its energy.Maryland Environmental Systems Inc., a 180-employee Columbia-based company, will become part of BGE Home Products & Services, a wholly owned subsidiary that BGE set up in June to run its existing gas-furnace repairs and its 11 retail appliance-electronics stores, the utility announced yesterday.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | July 21, 1998
MANY PEOPLE who are too young to recall what it was like to live through a blistering hot Baltimore summer without air conditioning. Relief from those sultry, airless days came slowly, beginning in the late 1920s and escalating in the 1950s.Among the first public buildings to employ air conditioning were the big downtown department stores. A 1931 item in Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s monthly newsletter announced that Stewart & Co. department store had air-conditioned its basement.In 1934, Hutzler Bros.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | July 19, 1994
Relentless heat and pervasive humidity permeate the McKeldin building, home to 65 patients at Springfield Hospital Center. Everyone swelters, patients and staff alike.A nurse returns to her work station drenched in sweat after a 15-minute walk through the halls. Patients lapse into lethargy, saying they prefer sleep to physical activity in the stifling atmosphere.McKeldin is the only building at the state-owned hospital for the mentally ill in Sykesville without central air conditioning.The aging, one-story brick structure houses three wards, each with at least 20 long-term patients, who range in age from 20 to 70.Staff members maintain an optimistic attitude, smiling through the perspiration permanently beaded on their brows.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 12, 2001
Sykesville Middle School might be at the top of the list of Carroll schools slated for air conditioning, but it could be bumped. The county has set aside $2 million for heating and air-conditioning projects for the school system. Westminster Elementary has a failing heating system, which takes priority over air conditioning. "We promised Sykesville it would be next on the list, but we don't have enough money to do both projects," Susan Krebs, school board president, said in a meeting with Carroll commissioners yesterday.
NEWS
By STEPHANIE HANES and STEPHANIE HANES,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2004
It might not be as well known as the National Merit Scholarship or the All-State athletic awards. But for Eastern Technical High School, the recent American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers competition was just as important. The Essex magnet school can boast of a formidable track record in the annual contest, which pits teams of students against each other in a race to design a particular heating or cooling system. Coming into this year's competition, it had won the contest for the society's Baltimore chapter three years in a row. This year, Eastern Tech extended that streak.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | January 6, 2008
The management company that operates the city-owned Annapolis Market House has sued the city for $2 million, alleging the loss of rental income because of the city's failure to install an air conditioning system and to allow it to rent sidewalk space to vendors. Lawyers on behalf of Market House Ventures LLC, a subsidiary of the Silver Spring-based Site Realty Group, which leases the Market House property, filed the lawsuit on Dec. 24 in Anne Arundel Circuit Court. The lawsuit, which alleges breach of contract, is the latest misfortune for the Market House.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | November 12, 1992
Mount Airy Elementary is not the only school in Carroll County with no air conditioning, but its third story is one of the hottest spots in the system, said Lester Surber, supervisor of school facilities.At least two county commissioners are a bit cool on the idea of spending $492,000 to air-condition the school."I don't know how to respond to that," said Commissioner President Donald I. Dell, who was surprised to learn yesterday that the Board of Education may ask for an additional $257,000 on Monday to pay for air conditioning.
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