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NEWS
May 26, 2013
On May 22 at 10:30 a.m., it was 86 degrees inside the classroom at Westowne Elementary School. According to Occupational Safety and Health Administration recommendations, office spaces should be cooled to around 75 to 79 degrees, depending on personal comfort levels and relative humidity. Baltimore County Public Schools' Department of Physical Facilities maintains a policy of cooling rooms to that range from early April until the end of the school year. If the temperature rises above 79 degrees, the building administrator is advised to contact the Department of Physical Facilities Customer Service Desk to report equipment failure.
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NEWS
By Lane Page and For The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
S ince they came out of the forest, our ancestors must have looked up to the skies for warm sunlight and cooling breezes. A few, looking down at natural steam vents and hot springs, found themselves able to take advantage of the earth itself for geothermal heat. Skipping to the present, when renewable energy tax credits, rebates and grants have refueled a serious interest in the underground energy source, this heat pump that uses water instead of air has taken a foothold in Howard County as a result of its long-term financial benefits, even after the demise of a local tax incentive.  Those who've gone with geothermal energy are pleased with their decisions.
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EXPLORE
June 15, 2011
Since riding the Howard Transit buses for quite some time, I have noticed that once the summer months come around, the buses start breaking down. Although it is a common occurrence during the summer, I do not think that the county's bus company is doing a good job keeping up with maintenance. If Howard Transit can afford to buy new buses, I would think they would have the money to keep these vehicles maintained. The main noticeable problem is the lack of air conditioning. During code orange or code red days, senior citizens and other residents with cardiac or breathing conditions are put in danger of their health. However, if you factor in the excessively hot environment on buses with no air conditioning, it puts them at twice the risk for a serious medical emergency.  Just recently, I was on two buses with no air conditioning. At one point, several ladies became concerned when they took notice that I might pass out from heat exhaustion. Because of no A/C on a code red day, I was put at a serious health risk because of a breathing condition.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
Leigh Peterson has one of the coolest roofs in Baltimore. Her rowhouse near Patterson Park sports a blinding white cap, topped by a row of shiny solar panels. Peterson, 29, a graduate student at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, doesn't need to see her roof to know it's cool, though. She just has to count the dollars she's saved on air conditioning. She got her roof coated as part of a comprehensive energy retrofit of her 109-year-old house, and her August electricity bill was about half what she paid last year.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | July 17, 2012
Tuesday is recognized as the birthday of air conditioning -- be thankful this year, because you'll need it. Willis Carrier, an engineer in Buffalo, N.Y., is credited with planning a device to regulate heat and humidity in a Brooklyn printing plant. He drafted the plans for the device July 17, 1902. Carrier patented the invention four years later, and in 1915, he and six colleagues formed the Carrier Engineering Corp. The device contained a spray nozzle originally designed for insecticide and it controlled both temperature and humidity.
NEWS
By Rebekah Brown, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2011
The Broadway Court Senior Life building in East Baltimore advertises being "in the heart of Baltimore. " Residents who had been without air conditioning from Friday through Monday afternoon said that it was like living "in the heat of Baltimore. " According to Armerlous Givens, the air conditioning was fixed "while the media was here" and came back on "around 2 or 3 [p.m.]. Givens, 66, said that it had been fixed last week as well and stopped working within a few hours. "We have all had a terrible time," Givens said Monday night.
NEWS
July 8, 2010
It is no surprise that the corporate-owned Ravenwood Nursing and Rehabilitation Center ("Heat forces relocation of dozens at nursing home," July 7), located in Baltimore City, was reported to be "plagued with air conditioning problems." The truth is that Ravenwood has long been plagued with numerous other problems as well, most of which violate the civil and human rights of residents there. As someone who has volunteered at the facility and as a disability rights advocate, I witnessed multiple inequities and maltreatment: people left in their beds for days, weeks or months on end; people not taken outside to see the sun except for bi-annual doctors' visits; people denied $14 a month when the corporation is paid an estimated $3500 a month for their "services;" and residents told that they do not have the right to choose where they live.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2013
Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz says he will ask the County Council for $17.2 million to fund air conditioning in five schools in Woodlawn, Middle River, Windsor Mill, Pikesville and Parkville. The state Board of Public Works on Wednesday approved $11.7 million for air conditioning of county schools. The county funds would help complete funding of the installation for Featherbed Lane, Hawthorne, Scotts Branch and Wellwood International elementary schools; and Parkville Middle School.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | July 4, 1992
Installing ductwork for heating and air conditioning is a bit like putting together a huge three-dimensional jigsaw puzzle.The basic rules of the game, however, are the same, whether you're retrofitting an older house, working with new construction, or adding heating and air conditioning to a new room, attic or basement.Basic Rule No. 1: Hot air rises, cold air falls.Ducts should be installed to take maximum advantage of natural air movement. For instance, for air conditioning to work properly, air returns, the large ducts that carry air back to the central unit, need to be installed high up on the wall of each upper floor, to capture warmer air and return it for cooling.
NEWS
By Kate Smith and Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2010
With Baltimore sweating through a second straight day of triple-digit temperatures, state officials ordered the Ravenwood Nursing and Rehabilitation Center to relocate all 150 patients because of problems with its air- conditioning system and began a comprehensive investigation of the facility. Throughout the day, residents in wheelchairs and on stretchers were loaded into vans and ambulances, as the West Franklin Street nursing home — where temperatures had climbed as high as 93 amid this week's heat wave — was gradually emptied.
NEWS
September 24, 2013
The following is compiled from local police reports. Our policy is to include descriptions when there is enough information to make identification possible. If you have any information about these crimes, call the Wilkens Police Station at 410-887-0872. Freeway, 2900 block, between 6 p.m. Sept. 20, and 4:59 p.m. Sept. 21. Window and door frame damaged at residence. No entry gained. Wilkens Avenue, 4000 block, between 10:45 and 10: 48 p.m., Sept. 20. Two men demanded cash and cartons of cigarettes at Royal Farm store.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2013
Though happily settled with her family in their Edgewater house, when Jennifer Bieberich gazed across the yard, she knew something was missing. "It was just calling for a barn," she says. The couple, including her husband Karl Bieberich, are no farmers, but that empty corner of their property is now home to a 1,050-square-foot "carriage house" barn constructed by Yankee Barn Homes, a New Hampshire-based company that designs and builds timber-frame homes around the country. The structure looks like a red barn from the outside; inside, it includes a utility space on the first floor and a great room on the second floor.
FEATURES
By Kristine Henry
The Baltimore Sun
| September 11, 2013
Did you hear that? It was the collective cry of dismay from working parents across Baltimore County who learned this morning that schools would be closing two hours early today -- and that after-care would be canceled -- because of excessive heat. This is one of the reasons I used to always wonder: How do families manage when both parents work full time? And how in the world do single parents do it? Well, thanks to my laptop and understanding bosses and colleagues (flattery gets me everywhere)
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2013
Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz says he will ask the County Council for $17.2 million to fund air conditioning in five schools in Woodlawn, Middle River, Windsor Mill, Pikesville and Parkville. The state Board of Public Works on Wednesday approved $11.7 million for air conditioning of county schools. The county funds would help complete funding of the installation for Featherbed Lane, Hawthorne, Scotts Branch and Wellwood International elementary schools; and Parkville Middle School.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
An inmate at a Western Maryland state prison tested positive for the bacterium that causes Legionnaires' disease, prompting an investigation of the facility's water and air-conditioning systems, corrections officials said Friday. The inmate, a man in his 40s, had been sent from Roxbury Correctional Institution in Hagerstown to Bon Secours Hospital in Baltimore, where he was found to be carrying legionella bacteria. The bacteria are found in warm water and can cause Legionnaires' disease, marked by a cough, high fever, muscle aches and headache.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
The National Weather Service says it will feel like 105 degrees in some areas around Baltimore Tuesday, and several health departments throughout the region issued advisories about a heat wave that's expected to last all week. The weather service said a heat advisory will be in effect from noon to 7 p.m. Tuesday, with temperatures in the upper 90s in and around Baltimore. Factoring for humidity, the temperatures will feel as high as 105. With the high temperatures expected to last all week, jurisdictions are opening cooling centers and urging caution.
BUSINESS
Jamie Smith Hopkins | April 30, 2013
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. said it will give $25 to each residential customer who recycles a working room air-conditioning unit at an event this weekend. The utility said consumers can drop off the room units at two Sears locations, Eastpoint Mall in Dundalk and Hunt Valley Towne Centre in Cockeysville. BGE said workers will unload the units from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday (May 4) and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday (May 5) . BGE said it will pay $25 for each room air-conditioning unit -- up to two per customer -- as part of its Smart Energy Savers Program . Checks will be mailed about four weeks after the recycling event.
NEWS
February 11, 2013
Over the past several years, Baltimore County has made steady progress as it seeks to air condition all its public schools. Despite limited funding, the county is on track to reduce the number of schools lacking air conditioning from 54 percent in 2010 to 36 percent within two years. Unfortunately, that progress is not shared uniformly throughout Baltimore County. There is a significant disparity between the western, northern and eastern parts of the county. Looking at schools by County Council district, after the current round of air conditioning, the number of non-air conditioned schools will stand at 28 percent in the 1st District (Catonsville)
NEWS
July 12, 2013
As U.S. citizens, we have grown so comfortable with air conditioning that we tend to forget about its benefits. We take for granted in the brutally hot and humid months that the automobile we drive, the place we call home, the grocery store, our work places, all have air conditioning. I cannot imagine how stiflingly unbearable it would be to live in a non-air-conditioned row house in Baltimore City during a hot spell (like the one we are currently muddling through). The residents seek so-called relief in the streets.
NEWS
June 27, 2013
The solution to Baltimore's crime problem ("Amid wave of 27 Baltimore shootings, police press for tips," June 26) is as simple as A, B and C. A. Put more feet on the street. It has been demonstrated before that more police on the street beat deters neighborhood crime. To accommodate this, sell half the patrol cars and take air conditioning out of the rest. B. Strengthen a regional coalition of law enforcement agencies in the city and surrounding jurisdictions to improve communication and cooperation.
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