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SPORTS
By DON VITEK | August 28, 1994
The Summer Foursome team event and the Mix or Match doubles tournament at Bel Air Bowl finished last Sunday after two months of intense competition.The team tournament drew 105 entries, and the doubles had 261. Both events had prize money of $1,000.Paige Green and Hersel Bowen combined to win the doubles title, and the team title went to The Lane Rangers -- Ethel Burkhouse, Brenda Lehr, Bonnie Kissner and Ginny Courtney.Green and Bowen fired a scratch total of 1,296; with handicap, their score became 1,413.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | May 27, 1997
Long before mega booksellers, video stores, bagel shops and themed eateries vied for attention in Bel Air, U.S. 1 met Route 24 in a pastoral pocket of farms, nurseries, a thoroughbred racetrack and, for its time, a cutting-edge bowling alley.Lil Scheppelmann walked into the low-slung brick building one day in 1961, saw row upon row of polished lanes, automatic pin setters and waitresses serving homemade minestrone soup over the restaurant's Formica counter and knew she'd found a second home.
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NEWS
By Donald G. Vitek | June 14, 1992
Some of the top bowlers from Bel Air Bowl will be off to San Antonio, Texas, in August competing in the national finals of the Bowling Proprietors Association of America Family/Adult-Child Bowling Tournament.Among the locals headed to the event are Derrick Smith and his father, George, and Kris Courtney and his mother, Ginny.They will compete for the $20,000 in scholarship money available.On May 23 at Elk Lanes in Elkridge, the Smith father/son team and the Courtney mother/son team won their respective divisions in the state finals.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | May 28, 1995
The Young American Bowling Alliance headquarters doesn't keep county records noting the youngest bowlers to set individual records, which is too bad.There's a great chance that 14-year-old Andy Carson, who posted a 300 game this month in the Travel League at Bel Air Bowl, is the youngest to shoot a perfect game in Harford County.Starting with the 300, Carson added games of 188 and 191 for a 679 series. That's 20 pins higher than the 659 he posted in January when he had games of 243, 209, 205.Carson was using a new Piranha bowling ball, fitted and drilled by Joe Bonny.
NEWS
By Donald G. Vitek | June 21, 1992
Over the winter, Linda Byus bowled one night a week in the Sunday Mixed League at Bel Air Bowl lanes in Bel Air, and that was enough for her to carry a 180 average.Linda lives in Forest Hill with her husband, Rick, who carries a 180-plus average in the same league.With the winter league over, Linda and Rick plan to bowl in a summer league at Brunswick Lanes in Perry Hall.But before the winter league rolled to a close, Linda threw her career-high single game -- 279.The memory of that should help her bowl well in the summer league.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | May 27, 1997
Long before mega booksellers, video stores, bagel shops and themed eateries vied for attention in Bel Air, U.S. 1 met Route 24 in a pastoral pocket of farms, nurseries, a thoroughbred racetrack and, for its time, a cutting-edge bowling alley.Lil Scheppelmann walked into the low-slung brick building one day in 1961, saw row upon row of polished lanes, automatic pin setters and waitresses serving homemade minestrone soup over the restaurant's Formica counter and knew she'd found a second home.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | April 10, 1994
Jim Richardson of Bel Air started bowling after he graduated from Bel Air High School when his aunt, Pat Gullion, needed a sub and asked him to bowl in her Thursday night league."
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | May 28, 1995
The Young American Bowling Alliance headquarters doesn't keep county records noting the youngest bowlers to set individual records, which is too bad.There's a great chance that 14-year-old Andy Carson, who posted a 300 game this month in the Travel League at Bel Air Bowl, is the youngest to shoot a perfect game in Harford County.Starting with the 300, Carson added games of 188 and 191 for a 679 series. That's 20 pins higher than the 659 he posted in January when he had games of 243, 209, 205.Carson was using a new Piranha bowling ball, fitted and drilled by Joe Bonny.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | November 27, 1994
On Nov. 12-13, the Harford County Women's Bowling Association was in action at Bel Air Bowl with singles, doubles and team events.The team handicap and scratch events were won by the Lane Rangers -- Ethel Burkhouse, Bonnie Kissner, Brenda Lehr, Ginny Courtney and Chele Rutherford.Their scratch total was 2,989; the handicap figure was 3,217.Karen Billingsley and Chris Ball teamed to win the handicap doubles with a 1,286 total.Barbara Blevins and Rutherford pounded out 1,241 pins for the victory in the scratch doubles.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | May 8, 1994
Mike Spencer and Bill Williams Jr. bowl at Bel Air Bowl. Neither set out to do any teaching but recently, by example, they proved a couple of points.One: you don't have to be a cranker to score well on the tenpin lanes.Two: It pays to know your equipment, and it pays to be able to make a lane adjustment when it's necessary.Williams of Aberdeen bowls in the Tuesday Twinighters at Bel Air Bowl and carries a 204 average.He started bowling when he was 8 years old; now 24, he has a career-high set of 758 and just posted his fourth perfect game.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | April 9, 1995
The Young American Bowling Alliance conducted its 11th annual Maryland Top Ten Invitational State Finals with 36 bowlers at County Lanes in Westminster last Sunday."
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | February 26, 1995
Jim Richardson, after being close a lot of times, finally posted his first 300 at Bel Air Bowl."Well, I do have two 300s at Forest Hill," Richardson said. "But even though I had an 800 set at Bel Air, I just could never seem to get the 300."That 800 set consisted of games of 254, 268 and 299 for a 821 series.Richardson bowls five nights a week in six leagues (Friday he bowls both early and late shifts) all at Bel Air Bowl.In the Thursday Twilighters league earlier this month, he started with a 208 game, then fired his 300 and came back with a 255."
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | February 12, 1995
Kirk Janney, born and raised in Harford County, began bowling tenpins as a teen-ager; now 22, he carries a 208 average in three leagues -- Monday and Tuesday at Bel Air Bowl, Thursday at Fair Lanes Edgewood.Last month he had a night to remember."I wasn't doing anything different that night," Janney said. "My first game wasn't even up to my average."That first game was a 198; his last game of the three-game set was a 215. But that middle game was a beauty.Twelve strikes for his third career perfect game.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | January 8, 1995
The 18th annual Cecil-Harford Young American Bowling Alliance Championship tournament at Aberdeen Proving Grounds tenpin lanes last month drew 21 youth teams, 86 single entries and 48 doubles contestants."
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | November 27, 1994
On Nov. 12-13, the Harford County Women's Bowling Association was in action at Bel Air Bowl with singles, doubles and team events.The team handicap and scratch events were won by the Lane Rangers -- Ethel Burkhouse, Bonnie Kissner, Brenda Lehr, Ginny Courtney and Chele Rutherford.Their scratch total was 2,989; the handicap figure was 3,217.Karen Billingsley and Chris Ball teamed to win the handicap doubles with a 1,286 total.Barbara Blevins and Rutherford pounded out 1,241 pins for the victory in the scratch doubles.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | October 23, 1994
The Cecil-Harford 700 Club scratch singles tournament at Fair Lanes Edgewood drew 28 entries to compete for a prize fund of $476 on Oct. 9.When the four qualifying games and the stepladder finals were over, tournament director Chuck Dippenworth said, "[Bill] Barlow figured out the lanes pretty good."After four games Barlow, 21, a Bel Air native, was top-seeded for the finals with 191-plus pins; in his only game in the stepladder finals he defeated Jim Alt, 203-180."I work nights so I can't bowl in the leagues," Barlow said.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | March 13, 1994
If you had been in Bel Air Bowl on Feb. 21, for the Monday First Nighters league, you could have watched the members of the P.E. Contractors team average 229 for every game of the 15 games shot that night for a total of 3,435 pins."
SPORTS
By SON VITEK | March 21, 1993
Carl E. (Mick) Barlow Jr., Robert Cryster Sr., Margaret Scott Russell, Betty Bucchi and Georgia Cooper were inducted into the Cecil-Harford Counties Bowling Association Hall of Fame last month.Owner of the first 300 game bowled in a CHCBA tournament, Barlow has been bowling since he was 16. In 1974 he was accepted as a member of the PBA. Averaging over 200 in three leagues currently, he has carried as high an average as 212. He's thrown several 299 games and several 700 series.A Bel Air resident, Barlow is manager of Bel Air Bowl, a center where he started working as a mechanic over 20 years ago.Cryster is still known as just "Coach" to most bowlers, young and old, at Bel Air Bowl.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | October 9, 1994
Carl Mohr turned 92 in May and the month before his birthday he suffered a stroke.Born in Lancaster Pa., but now living in Bel Air, Mohr was back on the tenpin lanes at Bel Air Bowl for his regular league -- the Tuesday Churchville Golden Agers -- just a few weeks after the stroke."
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | August 28, 1994
The Summer Foursome team event and the Mix or Match doubles tournament at Bel Air Bowl finished last Sunday after two months of intense competition.The team tournament drew 105 entries, and the doubles had 261. Both events had prize money of $1,000.Paige Green and Hersel Bowen combined to win the doubles title, and the team title went to The Lane Rangers -- Ethel Burkhouse, Brenda Lehr, Bonnie Kissner and Ginny Courtney.Green and Bowen fired a scratch total of 1,296; with handicap, their score became 1,413.
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