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By DAVE BARRY | July 30, 1995
We are not alone.I make this statement in light of an article sent to me by alert reader Steve Kennedy, who found it in an academic journal called Popular Music and Society. The article, written by a college professor named Cherrill P. Heaton, is entitled "Air Ball: Spontaneous Large Group Precision Chanting."The article concerns a phenomenon that often occurs at basketball games when a visiting player shoots an "air ball" -- a shot that misses everything. Immediately, the crowd, in a sportsmanlike effort to cause this player to commit suicide, will start chanting "AIR-ball . . . AIR-ball . . ."
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NEWS
August 5, 2014
In reference to your article of Aug. 2 ( "Goodell defends his call on Rice" ), I believe that NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell has missed the point by a wide margin. If this were basketball, we would be hearing raucous chants of "Air Ball. " The increasing complaints, including from a number of U.S. senators, are not about Ray Rice's two-game suspension being inconsistent with other domestic abuse cases in the NFL. The complaints are about the consistent leniency of the NFL with regard to the domestic abuse cases of its players.
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NEWS
August 5, 2014
In reference to your article of Aug. 2 ( "Goodell defends his call on Rice" ), I believe that NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell has missed the point by a wide margin. If this were basketball, we would be hearing raucous chants of "Air Ball. " The increasing complaints, including from a number of U.S. senators, are not about Ray Rice's two-game suspension being inconsistent with other domestic abuse cases in the NFL. The complaints are about the consistent leniency of the NFL with regard to the domestic abuse cases of its players.
SPORTS
By Mark Giannotto, The Washington Post | June 17, 2013
Crystal Langhorne (Maryland) scored all 16 of her points in the second half and had nine rebounds as the Washington Mystics rallied to upend the defending WNBA champion Indiana Fever, 64-60, on Sunday afternoon. It was Washington's third straight win and marked the second time the team has started a season with wins in four of its first five games. Washington went a league-worst 5-29 last season. Indiana (1-5) pulled ahead by four when it closed the third quarter on a 7-0 run. But forwards Michelle Snow and Langhorne ensured the Fever suffered its fifth straight defeat, combining for 14 of Washington's final 18 points.
NEWS
By HELEN CHAPPELL | May 27, 1992
Oysterback, Maryland.-- There's nothing lonelier than a deserted bar on a Monday night when it's just you and the TV. Have you noticed that ''Designing Women'' isn't funny since Charlene and Suzanne left? I have. Maybe that's why I am sitting here, looking out the window, watching Michael Ruarke play air ball.Watching that kid standing out there in the darkness all alone, I know he isn't just hanging out on the Blue Crab softball field, pretending to pitch. There's probably not a fan alive who hasn't played air ball; in your imagination, you're out there in the stadium, it's the top of the ninth, you've walked one and struck two out, the fans are going wild, the team is counting on you, and you're a legend in your own mind.
SPORTS
By Mark Giannotto, The Washington Post | June 17, 2013
Crystal Langhorne (Maryland) scored all 16 of her points in the second half and had nine rebounds as the Washington Mystics rallied to upend the defending WNBA champion Indiana Fever, 64-60, on Sunday afternoon. It was Washington's third straight win and marked the second time the team has started a season with wins in four of its first five games. Washington went a league-worst 5-29 last season. Indiana (1-5) pulled ahead by four when it closed the third quarter on a 7-0 run. But forwards Michelle Snow and Langhorne ensured the Fever suffered its fifth straight defeat, combining for 14 of Washington's final 18 points.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2011
Finally, Maryland could exhale. Finally, the Terrapins — who have had a propensity this season for losing close games and missing foul shots — could relax, knowing they overcame both troubling tendencies in the same game. Finally, free throws became Maryland's friend instead of foe. The Terps, who entered Saturday's game last in the Atlantic Coast Conference in free-throw percentage (63.1 percent), converted 12 of 15 in the final four minutes to preserve a much-needed 79-77 victory over Clemson.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | February 11, 2004
FOR SUCH A high-tech, truth-speaking revolutionary, Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban sure seems to have his head up his Wi-Fi. Of course, this is the same truth-speaking revolutionary who said Kobe Bryant's rape trial would help spike interest in the NBA. Some of us prefer our NBA interest spiked by Carmelo Anthony's poise, LeBron James' 1,000th point and Jerry Sloan's 900th win, but there's no accounting for taste. The Kobe comments kicked off this NBA season. Now, just in time for All-Star Weekend - no, it's not just a game if a fleet of stretch Escalade limos are involved - Cuban has a new cause celebre: the wisdom of sending NBA players to the Olympics when owners like him have these guys signed to guaranteed, multimillion-dollar contracts.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | November 27, 1992
Without tradition, Tevye the milkman warned us, we'd be like a fiddler on the roof. And what a place to be -- you'd probably have to end up adjusting the antenna.Tradition is nothing to sneeze at. Unless, of course, the tradition calls for sneezing. Yesterday, on Thanksgiving, many of us perpetuated tradition. We ate turkey. We watched football. We NTC dressed up like Ricky Ricardo and sang "Babaloo." (You don't do that at your house?)Today, I'm here to maintain tradition -- the Thanksgiving sports column.
NEWS
By George Neff Lucas | August 30, 1995
Bill Clinton may well celebrateWhen Congress the Hill doth vacate;Though vetoes are nearing,There's nary a hearing --Let's hear it for month number 8.* * *According to Vanity Fair,Newt's better half less couldn't careAbout being first spouseIn her hubby's White HouseAnd hopes that he never gets there.* * *Seems Packwood's advances were suchThat they seldom amounted to much;If he can't recall who,The women sure do --What he kept, many say, was in touch.* * *Diverse definitions of need:(1) elderly poor folks who pleadFor help to keep warmAgainst (2)
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2011
Finally, Maryland could exhale. Finally, the Terrapins — who have had a propensity this season for losing close games and missing foul shots — could relax, knowing they overcame both troubling tendencies in the same game. Finally, free throws became Maryland's friend instead of foe. The Terps, who entered Saturday's game last in the Atlantic Coast Conference in free-throw percentage (63.1 percent), converted 12 of 15 in the final four minutes to preserve a much-needed 79-77 victory over Clemson.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | February 11, 2004
FOR SUCH A high-tech, truth-speaking revolutionary, Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban sure seems to have his head up his Wi-Fi. Of course, this is the same truth-speaking revolutionary who said Kobe Bryant's rape trial would help spike interest in the NBA. Some of us prefer our NBA interest spiked by Carmelo Anthony's poise, LeBron James' 1,000th point and Jerry Sloan's 900th win, but there's no accounting for taste. The Kobe comments kicked off this NBA season. Now, just in time for All-Star Weekend - no, it's not just a game if a fleet of stretch Escalade limos are involved - Cuban has a new cause celebre: the wisdom of sending NBA players to the Olympics when owners like him have these guys signed to guaranteed, multimillion-dollar contracts.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | July 30, 1995
We are not alone.I make this statement in light of an article sent to me by alert reader Steve Kennedy, who found it in an academic journal called Popular Music and Society. The article, written by a college professor named Cherrill P. Heaton, is entitled "Air Ball: Spontaneous Large Group Precision Chanting."The article concerns a phenomenon that often occurs at basketball games when a visiting player shoots an "air ball" -- a shot that misses everything. Immediately, the crowd, in a sportsmanlike effort to cause this player to commit suicide, will start chanting "AIR-ball . . . AIR-ball . . ."
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | November 27, 1992
Without tradition, Tevye the milkman warned us, we'd be like a fiddler on the roof. And what a place to be -- you'd probably have to end up adjusting the antenna.Tradition is nothing to sneeze at. Unless, of course, the tradition calls for sneezing. Yesterday, on Thanksgiving, many of us perpetuated tradition. We ate turkey. We watched football. We NTC dressed up like Ricky Ricardo and sang "Babaloo." (You don't do that at your house?)Today, I'm here to maintain tradition -- the Thanksgiving sports column.
NEWS
By HELEN CHAPPELL | May 27, 1992
Oysterback, Maryland.-- There's nothing lonelier than a deserted bar on a Monday night when it's just you and the TV. Have you noticed that ''Designing Women'' isn't funny since Charlene and Suzanne left? I have. Maybe that's why I am sitting here, looking out the window, watching Michael Ruarke play air ball.Watching that kid standing out there in the darkness all alone, I know he isn't just hanging out on the Blue Crab softball field, pretending to pitch. There's probably not a fan alive who hasn't played air ball; in your imagination, you're out there in the stadium, it's the top of the ninth, you've walked one and struck two out, the fans are going wild, the team is counting on you, and you're a legend in your own mind.
SPORTS
By JEFF SEIDEL and JEFF SEIDEL,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 11, 2006
Aberdeen spent much of last night's game trailing. But the Eagles made a late run, which forward Darrell Blevins capped with the biggest shot of his career. Blevins caught an air ball and made a falling follow-up shot with 2.3 seconds left to give visiting Aberdeen a come-from-behind 52-50 victory over Edgewood in a likely preview of the Upper Chesapeake Bay Athletic Conference championship game later this month. Aberdeen (12-8) and Edgewood (14-5) are the leaders in the two UCBAC divisions, and this game doesn't count in the standings because they're in different divisions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2010
When it comes to music at the Preakness, there's only one tune that really means anything. And Sam the Bugler is ready to play it. The tune is known as the "Call to the Post," or "First Call." It's the rousing fanfare that precedes every horse race by about 10 minutes, a bugle call that lets everyone know that hoofs are about to start flying. Sam, who works full time, bugle in tow, for the New York State Racing Association, has made a living off of it for 18 years, sounding the call at Belmont Park, Aqueduct and Saratoga racetracks.
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