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By Janet L. Fix and Janet L. Fix,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | August 30, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Motorists on the nation's highways this Labor Day weekend will be seeing rolling reminders that air bags can kill and injure people, especially children.To reduce deaths and injuries from the powerful deployment of air bags, trucks with billboards on their sides will take to major highways as part of an education campaign financed by the National Automotive Occupant Protection Campaign, a coalition of automakers, insurers and safety groups.Targeted to reach the record 33 million travelers expected to hit the roads this weekend, the billboards warn: "Alert.
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By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2014
In reconstructing events in a fatal crash on Route 3 in Anne Arundel County, investigators obtained key evidence from a source many people probably don't know even exists: an air bag control module. The obscure part in the 2008 Chevrolet Cobalt driven by Elizabeth Haley Meyers showed the car came to a full stop before crossing the busy highway in front of a motorcycle that struck the car. That evidence refuted the statement of an eyewitness who told police he saw her texting without slowing down before pulling onto the highway from a shopping center.
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NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1997
Federal safety officials launched a national campaign here yesterday to educate the public on the benefits of air bags and the limited circumstances in which motorists are better off deactivating them.Rules unveiled this week give car owners the right to have air bag on-off switches installed beginning Jan. 19, but only with approval of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.Drivers must be unable to maintain a 10-inch distance from an air bag because of their short stature or a medical condition or be forced to have infants or young children in the front seat.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | September 23, 2007
The numbers game isn't adding up for average investors. Government data, corporate earnings, loan defaults, retail sales figures and Federal Reserve decisions often produce more fog than clarity about the future. Even former Fed Chairman Alan Greenspan contributed to this murky horizon. His book slams President Bush's lack of spending curbs and attributes the housing boom to lower long-term interest rates stemming from communism's fall. More important, he warns of the likelihood of higher rates in the future to thwart inflation.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 29, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- Auto burglars from New York to Los Angeles have added an explosive new item to their list of things to steal -- air bags.Insurance industry experts and police say the national outbreak is little more than 3 months old, and although statistics are not yet available, there are plenty of word-of-mouth reports."
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1997
With electrical tape and screwdriver in tow, Paul Goheen travels the United States in search of air bags to disconnect. The Texan was in Baltimore yesterday to work on the cars of several older women -- all frightened of their air bags.For many, Goheen is a kind of savior -- doing a job no one else will.His customers share a fear that has been fueled by reports of five dozen air bag-related deaths, most involving unbuckled children and short women seated close to the air bag.In Maryland, some of Goheen's customers have been unable to find a local mechanic to disconnect their air bags, even though they have the required permission from the federal government to have the work done.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Flooded by calls from worried consumers, federal transportation officials unveiled yesterday a sweeping plan to reduce air bag fatalities through detailed warning labels and phased-in improvements to air bag technology.The key to the proposal is an abandonment of the current one-size-fits-all air bag in favor of one that would deploy differently depending on a person's size and the circumstances of the crash.The "smart" air bags would not be required until the 1999 model-year cars, however, so officials offered several short-term solutions for children and short adults -- the groups at risk of injury and death from air bags.
NEWS
November 10, 1996
"AIR BAG SAFETY: Buckle everyone. Children in back." That vital message should be burned into the minds of all motorists, and soon should be emblazoned by federal rule on all new cars.Air bags save lives -- when used with safety belts. Some 1,500 lives have been saved by these instant-inflating bags in frontal auto crashes.But air bags can kill children -- even if they are properly belted. After several inconclusive reports, instances of child deaths from the 200-mile-per-hour force of air bag deployment are coming to light.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 8, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Elizabeth H. Dole may be out of the limelight these days after dropping out of the presidential race, but she re-emerged to prominence yesterday in the Supreme Court -- without even being there.The justices were exploring a case about air bags as an auto safety feature, and they appeared to be very curious about Dole's views from 15 years ago, when she was secretary of transportation in President Ronald Reagan's Cabinet.Back then, Dole was responsible for developing a policy on "passive restraints" in cars.
NEWS
By MARTHA B. LANDAW AND JEFFREY M. LANDAW | December 15, 1996
My parents will KILL me," the little girl in the car pool sobbed.Normally, this 4-year-old was the world's most even-tempered child. What had thrown her? She was sitting in a borrowed car whose retro-fitted seat belts didn't look like what her parents had taught her was safe.We eventually talked the girl into the seat belt - which was safe - and didn't think much about the incident until the recent controversy over the safety of automobile air bags brewed up. If more adults were as responsible now as that girl's parents had taught her to be, the air bag controversy would have fizzled long before it started.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | August 30, 2006
Carl Cyrus Clark, an internationally known expert on human acceleration and crash protection whose research contributed significantly to the development of air bags for automobiles and airplanes, died of a heart attack Thursday at his summer home in Thetford, Vt. The longtime Catonsville resident was 82. "The bottom line in discussing Carl Clark is that people are safer because of his work. He did more for humanity than 99.9 percent of the world's scientists," consumer advocate Ralph Nader said yesterday.
NEWS
January 8, 2006
Howard County police are asking people to lock their cars after the thefts of eight air bags last week in Laurel, said Pfc. Brandon Justice, a spokesman for the Police Department. Justice said 17 air bags have been reported stolen in Howard County since October. In addition, police recovered 20 stolen bags last year from county auto repair shops. On 14 of them, the vehicle identification numbers had been obliterated from the material, Justice said. The VIN is the easiest way for police to match a car with a stolen part.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2004
Driven by a lucrative black market trade, thieves have snatched more than three dozen air bags from vehicles in Howard and Montgomery counties since early September. Howard police said yesterday that 27 vehicles have had at least one air bag stolen since early September. Montgomery police said that thieves stole air bags from 14 vehicles during a two-week spree early last month. Air bag thefts, which have increased nationwide since the early 1990s by some estimates, have triggered concerns among consumer advocates, who blame faulty or fraudulent air bags for motorists' injuries.
NEWS
By R. Alonso-Zaldivar and R. Alonso-Zaldivar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 12, 2004
WASHINGTON - A federal auto safety agency will propose new requirements today to give drivers and passengers more protection against devastating head injuries in side-impact crashes, government and industry officials said. The regulations would, in effect, require automakers to phase in side curtain air bags as standard equipment in new vehicles by mandating tougher crash tests and new injury limits for test dummies, industry and safety groups said. The new safety measures would save 700 to 1,000 lives a year when fully phased in, according to an analysis by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, which is proposing the changes.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 10, 2004
The Spirit rover's roll-off from its landing platform will be delayed one or two days, until Thursday or Friday, because engineers were not able to retract a partially collapsed air bag from its preferred pathway. The craft will pivot 120 degrees to the right aboard the lander before rolling off an alternative ramp, said Matt Wallace, a mission manager at Jet Propulsion Laboratory. That maneuver will probably consume an extra day. Spirit could probably safely roll over the air bag, which sticks up a few inches, but the project team prefers not to take any chances with the craft.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 8, 2004
A couple of minor "hiccups" in getting NASA's Spirit rover settled in on Mars have delayed the rover's roll-off from the landing platform until at least Wednesday, Jet Propulsion Laboratory officials said. The problems involved the rover's high-gain antenna, which provides a high-speed data link directly with Earth, and the collapsed air bag that cushioned the craft's landing in Gusev Crater on Saturday. Neither problem was expected to seriously affect the overall mission, the officials said at a news conference yesterday in Pasadena, Calif.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | November 7, 1996
WASHINGTON -- When Susan Hayes, 29, skidded off the road into a drainage ditch in June, the air bag in her Mazda Miata slammed into her head and broke her neck.The 5-foot-2-inch Baltimore woman spent six weeks in a coma and eight weeks in intensive care. She says she was wearing a seat belt in the crash."Without the air bag, I would have walked away," she said last week. Her 4-year-old son was belted in the front passenger seat -- which did not have an air bag -- and did walk away.While the risk that air bags pose to children has attracted national attention, that danger has overshadowed the fact that bags also can injure and kill adults, particularly short women.
NEWS
September 20, 1998
AUTO air bag rules proposed recently would save 400 lives -- mostly children and small women. That's the estimated number of people who could be killed by air bags that inflate in an accident.The Transportation Department rules would require automakers to test a family of crash dummies, from adult males to smallwomen to 3-year-old children, in developing a new generation of size-sensing "smart" air bags that could adjust the inflating force to the passenger.Previous air bag tests only required protecting an average-size adult male dummy in a 30-mile-an-hour crash.
NEWS
By Rick Popely and Jim Mateja and Rick Popely and Jim Mateja,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 18, 2003
Making side air bags standard would significantly reduce deaths and injuries, an insurance industry lobbying group said yesterday in releasing results of a new side-impact crash test. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety called on automakers to install side air bags on all vehicles to protect occupants from side collisions, the second-highest cause of occupant deaths after frontal collisions. The federal government requires driver and front passenger air bags, but does not require side air bags, which are standard or optional on about two-thirds of new models sold in the United States.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 30, 2001
WASHINGTON - Air bags are killing fewer children than they did five years ago, government data show, and safety experts give most of the credit to parents who are keeping children 12 years old and younger out of the front seat. In 1996, passenger-side air bags were in about 22 million vehicles and they killed 35 children, according to the National Safety Council, a private nonprofit organization. Air bag use was growing, the council said, and so were fears about more deaths. "We had an impending crisis," said Chuck Hurley, a council spokesman.
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