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By New York Times News Service | October 16, 2006
LOS ANGELES -- Air America Radio, the liberal talk network started two years ago in a bid to counter the influence of conservative radio personalities like Rush Limbaugh, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection Friday. The network and its corporate parent, Piquant LLC, filed after an owner of stations that carried Air America programming took legal action to freeze its bank accounts as part of a dispute over unpaid bills. Last month, the network's backers said they would no longer provide cash to subsidize its operating losses, according to an affidavit filed by Air America in connection with the bankruptcy.
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By Tom Moriarty | February 2, 2010
Conservatives are outraged. And liberals are dismayed. That's the state of political discourse in America, at least for now, at least in the age of nonstop punditry and political commentary. And that's one of the reasons why Air America, the liberal alternative to Rush Limbaugh and the other denizens of right-wing radio, recently went out of business. It turns out that dismay doesn't play as well as outrage, at least on the radio. Radio is better suited to outrage because it's a medium that thrives on voice.
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By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2004
A roster of semi-famous liberal talk-show hosts has kicked off Air America Radio with the lofty mission of countering conservative talk-show hosts Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity, Bill O'Reilly and their ilk. One week in, the newcomers have succeeded in making the microphones work - an improvement over their first few days on the air. As comedian Al Franken, the fledgling network's marquee player, proudly announced to listeners: "I am not a radio professional....
FEATURES
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,sun reporter | November 9, 2006
For conservative radio talk-show hosts, the power shift in Congress is not necessarily a cause for gloom. In fact, some of the hosts say, the new Democratic majority presents them with a golden opportunity. "It probably gives talk radio another two years of things to talk about," said Frank Luber, co-host of The Sean and Frank Show in the mornings on Baltimore's WCBM. The station broadcasts shows by several conservative commentators, including Sean Hannity and Rush Limbaugh, who was widely criticized recently for his mimicry of Michael J. Fox's ads in support of Democratic candidates' backing stem-cell research.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 31, 2005
What would happen if a group of angry liberals with little or no broadcast experience founded a national network in hopes of making their voices heard amid the din of conservative talk radio? That's the question posed by Left of the Dial, an HBO documentary airing tonight at 8, about last year's launch of Air America Radio. And while the answer isn't pretty, the film that records it is fascinating, funny and illuminating. This is one great and wicked backstage story of media madness and cultural warfare.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Liz Halloran and Liz Halloran,HARTFORD COURANT | March 14, 2004
Are American radio listeners ready for The O'Franken Factor? Moreover, is The O'Franken Factor really ready for them? This past week, after more than a year of planning and pitfalls, the Air America radio network, comprising a handful of politically liberal shows airing on four stations, announced plans to begin operations March 31. "We are not ceding this territory any more," comedian and writer Al Franken said from the network's New York offices Wednesday....
FEATURES
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,sun reporter | November 9, 2006
For conservative radio talk-show hosts, the power shift in Congress is not necessarily a cause for gloom. In fact, some of the hosts say, the new Democratic majority presents them with a golden opportunity. "It probably gives talk radio another two years of things to talk about," said Frank Luber, co-host of The Sean and Frank Show in the mornings on Baltimore's WCBM. The station broadcasts shows by several conservative commentators, including Sean Hannity and Rush Limbaugh, who was widely criticized recently for his mimicry of Michael J. Fox's ads in support of Democratic candidates' backing stem-cell research.
NEWS
By Tom Moriarty | February 2, 2010
Conservatives are outraged. And liberals are dismayed. That's the state of political discourse in America, at least for now, at least in the age of nonstop punditry and political commentary. And that's one of the reasons why Air America, the liberal alternative to Rush Limbaugh and the other denizens of right-wing radio, recently went out of business. It turns out that dismay doesn't play as well as outrage, at least on the radio. Radio is better suited to outrage because it's a medium that thrives on voice.
NEWS
September 8, 2008
Jessica Simpson makes her Grand Old Opry debut NASHVILLE, Tenn.: Pop star turned country singer Jessica Simpson told a crowd during her Grand Ole Opry debut that she burst into tears the first times she heard the song "Remember That" and knew God wanted her to sing it. "It's a very personal song for a lot of women," Simpson told the audience Saturday in introducing the track from her new album Do You Know, which hits stores tomorrow.
FEATURES
By Vera Eidelman and Jeffrey Dieter | July 24, 2004
Call it trickle-down politics. The culture wars that have raged across our fair land for years now have moved from the highbrow realms of think tanks, religion and academia to new battlegrounds: the concert hall, the movie theater, even the auto showroom. Welcome to the pop culture wars of 2004. In this fiery summer of Fahrenheit 9 / 11 and the political conventions, it seems, once-simple consumer choices like the music we listen to, the books we read, the TV shows we watch, even the food we eat have become political statements.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | October 16, 2006
LOS ANGELES -- Air America Radio, the liberal talk network started two years ago in a bid to counter the influence of conservative radio personalities like Rush Limbaugh, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection Friday. The network and its corporate parent, Piquant LLC, filed after an owner of stations that carried Air America programming took legal action to freeze its bank accounts as part of a dispute over unpaid bills. Last month, the network's backers said they would no longer provide cash to subsidize its operating losses, according to an affidavit filed by Air America in connection with the bankruptcy.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 31, 2005
What would happen if a group of angry liberals with little or no broadcast experience founded a national network in hopes of making their voices heard amid the din of conservative talk radio? That's the question posed by Left of the Dial, an HBO documentary airing tonight at 8, about last year's launch of Air America Radio. And while the answer isn't pretty, the film that records it is fascinating, funny and illuminating. This is one great and wicked backstage story of media madness and cultural warfare.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2004
A roster of semi-famous liberal talk-show hosts has kicked off Air America Radio with the lofty mission of countering conservative talk-show hosts Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity, Bill O'Reilly and their ilk. One week in, the newcomers have succeeded in making the microphones work - an improvement over their first few days on the air. As comedian Al Franken, the fledgling network's marquee player, proudly announced to listeners: "I am not a radio professional....
ENTERTAINMENT
By Liz Halloran and Liz Halloran,HARTFORD COURANT | March 14, 2004
Are American radio listeners ready for The O'Franken Factor? Moreover, is The O'Franken Factor really ready for them? This past week, after more than a year of planning and pitfalls, the Air America radio network, comprising a handful of politically liberal shows airing on four stations, announced plans to begin operations March 31. "We are not ceding this territory any more," comedian and writer Al Franken said from the network's New York offices Wednesday....
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