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By Jonathan Bor | August 1, 1991
A very rare strain of the AIDS virus with roots in West Africa has been identified in four Marylanders, marking the first time the virus has been confirmed anywhere in the state.In announcing the findings, Maryland Health Secretary Nelson J. Sabatini said yesterday that all four were people who had shown up at state-run testing centers in Montgomery County since 1988 to learn if they were at risk for AIDS.The rare virus, known as HIV-2, behaves in much the same fashion as does HIV-1, the more common virus that has infected an estimated 1 million people in the United States.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann | May 2, 2012
Howard County police have charged a man with holding up a pharmacist in Columbia with a syringe filled with blood that he claimed was tainted with the AIDS virus according to authorities. Police said the man got away with $27,000 worth of prescription drugs. The authorities said they confirmed the syringe contained blood and are testing it to determine if it indeed carried the virus. The suspect has been identified as Benjamin Frederick Blessing, 52, of the 5200 block of Golden Sky Court in Columbia.
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NEWS
By David Simon | December 25, 1991
A study of more than 300 infants in Baltimore and Haiti released yesterday confirms that a simple and inexpensive blood test can identify infection with the AIDS virus in children as young as 3 to 6 months.The new test will allow doctors and parents to determine the status of newborns much sooner than could be done using the most common blood tests for the human immunodeficiency virus that causes AIDS.The most widely used tests cannot reliably detect HIV infection in infants younger than 12 to 15 months of age.The chance that an HIV-infected mother will pass the virus to her fetus is estimated between 13 percent and 45 percent, according to experts.
NEWS
August 25, 2011
In the 1980s, when researchers first identified the virus that causes AIDS, a positive HIV test was a virtual death sentence. There was no cure for the disease and no effective treatment; patients usually died within a few months or years of being diagnosed. But beginning in the 1990s, with the development of powerful antiretroviral drugs, that began to change. AIDS became a manageable, chronic illness rather than an invariably fatal disorder. Today, people infected with the virus are living longer even as their numbers have grown and the rate of new infections has declined.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | December 3, 1994
A Carroll County man who has the AIDS virus has been accused of raping his 8-year-old step-grandson, prompting police to charge the man with assault with intent to murder.This is the first time that Carroll County prosecutors have used the charge against someone they say knew he was carrying the immunodeficiency virus that causes AIDS. It is one of a handful of such cases in Maryland."He knew before he married the boy's grandmother -- he knew that he was HIV-positive," said state police Tfc. Joseph M. Newcomer, a sex abuse investigator for the Carroll County Child Abuse and Sexual Assault unit who filed the charges.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | March 6, 1991
The rate of HIV infection, the virus that causes AIDS, is higher among women than men entering prisons or jails, according to a new Johns Hopkins School of Public Health study.The finding is somewhat surprising, said Dr. David Vlahov, the principal investigator, because other population-based studies in the United States have found that men are more likely to be infected than women.Much of the higher rate of infection with the human immunodeficiency virus for female inmates probably reflects a history of intravenous drug use and prostitution, often necessary to support drug habits, Vlahov said.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | April 27, 1999
Researchers have found evidence that the AIDS virus can hide in the immune system for 60 years or more, evading eradication. The finding, by scientists at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, quashes the hope that patients taking today's best medications will be able to stop taking their drugs once the virus burns itself out. For now, there are no signs that the virus ever goes away. "The virus has a mechanism that allows for lifetime persistence," said Dr. Robert Siliciano, a Hopkins AIDS researcher.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 11, 2002
BARCELONA, Spain - By 2010, 6 percent of all children in Africa will have lost at least one parent to the AIDS virus, United Nations and U.S. government officials said in a report issued at the 14th International AIDS Conference yesterday. The number of orphans, defined as children younger than 15 who lose one or both parents, is expected to rise in Africa from 11 million now to 20 million by 2010, the officials said. Also, HIV will have orphaned 5 million children elsewhere in the world by 2010, according to the report.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 4, 1998
Scientists have discovered why some people who are infected with the AIDS virus have a rapid downhill course, becoming gravely ill and dying within a few years, while most infected people live for years without major symptoms.The key is a gene that acts like a molecular rheostat, turning up or down the activity of another gene that produces a protein the AIDS virus uses as a doorway to enter cells.A normal variant of the rheostat gene accelerates the onslaught of the AIDS virus in about a fifth of people whose HIV infection progresses rapidly.
NEWS
By Medical Tribune News Service | November 12, 1994
Flu shots may backfire on people with AIDS, raising the level of the AIDS virus in their blood without protecting them from the flu, a new study has found.Researchers at the University of California's San Francisco Medical Center found that most study participants had three times the normal amount of HIV in their blood for a short time after getting an influenza vaccination.The flu vaccine activates the same immune-system cells that harbor HIV, causing it to multiply as the cells divide, according to the researchers, who presented the study this week at the annual meeting of the American College of Allergy and Immunology in San Francisco.
NEWS
June 29, 2011
Thomas McDonough of Towson, asks if U.S. taxpayer dollars sent to fight AIDS in Africa are not better used right here in Baltimore or Detroit, at least for now ("African AIDS money better spent at home," June 25). Senora McGuire of Dundalk deplores the money Michelle Obama and family have wasted on their recent Africa trip ("How can we afford First Lady's trip to Africa?" June 28). While referring to AIDS activists talking to the First lady about the plight of AIDS victims, Ms. McGuire says that AIDS will long be with us and there is no use talking about it. It is a testament to the medical community and AIDS activists that people like Mr. McDonough and Ms. McGuire can make light of AIDS this way. AIDS is treatable as a chronic illness for now. Antiviral use is more widespread, science is supplanting superstition in Africa, whole populations of people are not being decimated, and AIDS orphans hopefully will grow less staggeringly large in number.
NEWS
July 22, 2010
Nearly a generation after researchers isolated the HIV virus that causes AIDS, there is still no cure for the disease nor a vaccine to protect people from infection. But a new White House strategy to curb the spread of AIDS, and reports this week of an experimental gel that helps reduce the chances of transmitting the virus in women, offer hope that millions of lives can be saved over the next 20 years both in the U.S. and abroad. The president's plan builds on efforts begun during the Bush administration to encourage people to get tested for the virus and to seek treatment before symptoms appear.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,Tribune Newspapers | September 4, 2009
After 15 years of futile search for a vaccine against the AIDS virus, researchers are reporting the tantalizing discovery of antibodies that can prevent the virus from multiplying in the body and producing severe disease. They do not have a vaccine yet, but they may well have a road map toward the production of one. A team headquartered at the Scripps Research Institute in San Diego reports today in the journal Science that they have isolated two so-called broadly neutralizing antibodies that can block the action of many different strains of HIV, the virus responsible for the AIDS pandemic.
NEWS
December 1, 2008
AIDS virus could be eliminated in a decade The virus that causes AIDS could theoretically be eliminated in a decade, if all people living in countries with high infection rates are regularly tested and treated, according to a new mathematical model. It is an intriguing solution to end the AIDS epidemic. But it is based on assumptions rather than data and is riddled with logistical problems. The research was published online last week in the medical journal, The Lancet. "It's quite a startling result," said Charlie Gilks, an AIDS treatment expert at the World Health Organization and one of the paper's authors.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon AND KELLY BREWINGTON and Kelly Brewington and Stephanie Desmon AND KELLY BREWINGTON and Kelly Brewington,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com and kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | October 7, 2008
Twenty-five years after the discovery of the virus that causes AIDS, two French researchers were awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine yesterday for their role in that scientific breakthrough. Perhaps more notable than who won the award is who did not: Dr. Robert C. Gallo, the University of Maryland virologist who has long been credited as a co-discoverer of the human immunodeficiency virus and whose early work led to a blood test for HIV that is believed to have saved millions of lives.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun reporter | December 4, 2007
African-American gay men are more than twice as likely to be infected with the AIDS virus than their white counterparts, but the reasons aren't abundantly clear, federal researchers said yesterday. "Men who have sex with men account for almost half of all people estimated to be living with HIV in the United States, and African-Americans are the most heavily impacted," said Kevin Fenton, director of HIV prevention at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. Researchers at a national prevention conference yesterday said they were somewhat perplexed by the disparity.
NEWS
By Laurie Goering and Laurie Goering,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 7, 2007
NEW DELHI -- India has about half as many people infected with the AIDS virus as previously believed, India's government confirmed yesterday. New estimations of the country's infection rate, based on a nationwide house-to-house survey with blood sampling as well as on prenatal blood tests of pregnant women, suggests the country has about 2.47 million people infected with the virus that causes AIDS, a sharp drop from the previous estimate of 5.7 million,...
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | November 29, 1990
Preliminary findings in a new survey of HIV infection on 35 college campuses, including two in Maryland, show that prevalence of the AIDS virus has risen slightly with the potential for further spread.Based on the first 16,000 of 28,000 blood specimens to be analyzed by February, the survey shows that the virus that leads to AIDS affects 2.3 in every 1,000 college students, believed to be about the same rate as in the general population. The survey was conducted during the first six months of 1990.
NEWS
By Jia-Rui Chong and Thomas H. Maugh II and Jia-Rui Chong and Thomas H. Maugh II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 21, 2007
The United Nations has radically lowered years of estimates of the number of people worldwide infected by the AIDS virus, revealing that the AIDS pandemic is waning for the first time since HIV was discovered 26 years ago. The revised figures yesterday, which were the result of more sophisticated sampling techniques, indicate that the number of new infections peaked in 1998 and that the number of deaths peaked in 2005. The new analysis shows that the total number of people living with HIV has been gradually increasing - but at a slower rate than in the past.
NEWS
By Laurie Goering and Laurie Goering,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 7, 2007
NEW DELHI -- India has about half as many people infected with the AIDS virus as previously believed, India's government confirmed yesterday. New estimations of the country's infection rate, based on a nationwide house-to-house survey with blood sampling as well as on prenatal blood tests of pregnant women, suggests the country has about 2.47 million people infected with the virus that causes AIDS, a sharp drop from the previous estimate of 5.7 million,...
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