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Aids Testing

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NEWS
July 17, 1991
More than 78 percent of callers to SUNDIAL, or 259 out of 332, think health workers who use procedures that may make them prone to exposure to the AIDS virus should have compulsory AIDS tests.The 73 other callers, just under 22 percent, agreed with the recommendations of the federal Centers for Disease Control that call for such health workers voluntarily to learn whether they carry the AIDS virus and stop performing the procedures if the test is positive. The CDC did not recommend compulsory AIDS testing.
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FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
Pet lovers in Bel Air have a new shopping option thanks to the opening of Mill at the Mall, a pet-supply boutique sharing space with the Humane Society of Harford County's "Rescue Me!" adoption center inside Harford Mall. Cats available for adoption watch from the right side of the store while customers browse for food, treats, toys, crates, beds, grooming supplies and other goodies from the new boutique, operated by The Mill of Bel Air. The store also carries bird seed, feeders, and accessories, along with gifts that include T-shirts and flags.
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NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | June 5, 1991
CHICAGO -- The question of whether doctors must get written consent from a patient to test for acquired immune deficiency syndrome, or whether a spoken reply is enough, is prompting debate among health care professionals nationwide.The American Medical Association's board of trustees wants to make it easier for doctors to test patients for the deadly disease, arguing that early detection makes it possible to prescribe treatment to prolong a patient's life and could prevent its unknowing spread to others.
NEWS
February 7, 2008
Church sign is rejected on appeal The state Court of Special Appeals upheld yesterday the county's denial of a request by Trinity Assembly of God to erect a large sign on church property at Interstate 83 and the Baltimore Beltway. The court said the rejection of a variance for the proposed 25-foot-high, 250-square-foot electronic sign, which was four times higher and 10 times bigger than regulations allow, did not infringe on the church's ability to exercise its constitutional rights.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr | June 26, 1991
The Maryland attorney general yesterday told Gov. William Donald Schaefer that the state prison system's medical services contractor could require AIDS tests of some of its workers, based on the risk posed to patients.In a 15-page opinion prepared at Mr. Schaefer's request, Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. said that testing could be required if public health professionals determine that an employee who regularly performed certain "invasive" medical procedures posed a "significant risk" of transmitting the AIDS virus to patients.
SPORTS
December 4, 1991
NBA, NHL plan talks on AIDS testingThe NBA and NHL plan discussions this week on how to handle testing for the AIDS virus.The NBA was to meet last night in New York City with the players association in what a league spokesman termed "a planning session" on AIDS testing and the possible ramifications of the disease for the league.An NHL official said in Montreal that AIDS would probably be discussed at a meeting of the league's Board of Governors, which starts tomorrow in Palm Beach, Fla.Gary Meagher, the league's communications director, said the NHL had no particular AIDS prevention program "but if a player comes to us for help, we'll do everything we can."
NEWS
January 18, 2008
Hospital plans car diovascular clinic As part of its partnership with The Mall in Columbia, Howard County General Hospital will hold a cardiovascular clinic from 9 a.m. to noon Feb. 23 in the Lord & Taylor court at the mall. Cardiologist Dr. Monica Aggarwal will speak about "Your Heart: What You Should Know About Risk Factors and Prevention" at 10 a.m. Blood pressure, cholesterol and carotid artery screenings will be offered, along with body mass index and pulmonary function testing. Information on nutrition, cardiac rehabilitation, acupuncture and programs such as Healthy Howard and Get Active Howard County will be available.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
Pet lovers in Bel Air have a new shopping option thanks to the opening of Mill at the Mall, a pet-supply boutique sharing space with the Humane Society of Harford County's "Rescue Me!" adoption center inside Harford Mall. Cats available for adoption watch from the right side of the store while customers browse for food, treats, toys, crates, beds, grooming supplies and other goodies from the new boutique, operated by The Mill of Bel Air. The store also carries bird seed, feeders, and accessories, along with gifts that include T-shirts and flags.
NEWS
January 18, 2008
Hospital plans car diovascular clinic As part of its partnership with The Mall in Columbia, Howard County General Hospital will hold a cardiovascular clinic from 9 a.m. to noon Feb. 23 in the Lord & Taylor court at the mall. Cardiologist Dr. Monica Aggarwal will speak about "Your Heart: What You Should Know About Risk Factors and Prevention" at 10 a.m. Blood pressure, cholesterol and carotid artery screenings will be offered, along with body mass index and pulmonary function testing. Information on nutrition, cardiac rehabilitation, acupuncture and programs such as Healthy Howard and Get Active Howard County will be available.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2002
Faced with a doubling of county AIDS cases in the past three years, Carroll health officials have launched a campaign to encourage testing and early treatment, to educate young people and to make the population more aware of the potentially fatal illness. "We have to get the prevention message out, not only to youth but to their parents," said Bernice Culver, a registered nurse and acquired immune deficiency syndrome case manager for Carroll County Health Department. "Death rates are down, but infection rates are up. People have become relaxed in their attitudes to this disease.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1997
Denying they are succumbing to criticism that they are repeating mistakes of the Tuskegee experiments, Johns Hopkins and federal health officials said yesterday that they might drop -- placebos from an AIDS prevention trial to be held in Ethiopia next year.Marc Kusinitz, a spokesman for the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, said the placebo segment of the study will be abandoned. He said the decision was based on preliminary evidence from a study in Thailand showing benefits of an experimental therapy.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | July 7, 1996
In his campaign for a top position with a powerful national lobbying group, Howard County Councilman C. Vernon Gray is soliciting $1,000 donations from dozens of state and national companies -- a move that tests the limits of the county's ethics law.In letters signed by corporate supporters and obtained by The Sun, Gray has sought money from about 50 companies, assuring each that the contributions need not be reported under state election laws.Among the $1,000 donors, according to Gray, is Comcast Cablevision, the county's largest cable provider with 52,000 subscribers.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1996
Maryland has become the ninth state to make testing for the AIDS virus mandatory for professional fighters and kick-boxers licensed by the state.The Maryland State Athletic Commission, headed by chairman D. Chester O'Sullivan, voted unanimously Thursday night to require annual blood tests for AIDS and highly contagious Hepatitis B no more than 30 days before a first-time licensee or a boxer seeking a license renewal will be allowed to fight within the...
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 6, 1995
DETROIT -- Scientists have discovered another awful fact about AIDS: People are extremely contagious in the first 60 days after getting the AIDS virus -- the same period in which they can't possibly know they have it.The practical implication of the findings: If you suspect your partner is having sex with others, you'd better use a condom. Tests can't detect the virus for four to six weeks -- when most of that risky, early phase has passed.A University of Michigan study, being announced today by the university, found that in the first 60 days after being infected, a person could transmit the human immunodeficiency virus, which causes AIDS, to someone else in as many as a third of his sexual encounters.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | June 26, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Clinton administration officials have agreed to reopen discussions on an 8-year-old claim by a French research institute that U.S. scientists appropriated its discovery of the AIDS virus and its invention of the widely used AIDS blood test.The willingness to consider the French claims was contained in a letter last week from Dr. Harold Varmus, director of the National Institutes of Health, to his French counterpart, Dr. Maxime Schwartz, who heads the Pasteur Institute of Paris.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | March 12, 1994
A lawsuit seeking $1.5 million has been filed on behalf of a Frederick County man who claims he was arrested, jailed and forced to take an AIDS test after health officials targeted him as a potential carrier of the virus that causes the deadly disease.Attorneys for the man, identified only as John Doe in the lawsuit, claim that Frederick County sheriffs and health officials overstepped their bounds and put the man through public humiliation because of a heightened fear of AIDS.The man was arrested Aug. 3, 1992, after county officials obtained a search warrant for his blood, claiming he was "actively engaging in sexual activities with other persons in the gay community."
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