Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAids Patient
IN THE NEWS

Aids Patient

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | April 23, 1995
Lisa W. Yingling looks the picture of good health. She smiles broadly and often, and pokes fun at AIDS, the disease that is threatening her life."Even my husband is totally optimistic," she said. "He says I look well, so I must be well."Five years ago, with the tiny prick of a needle, this 36-year-old Carroll County nurse went from care giver to carrier of deadly HIV. Now an AIDS patient retired on disability, Ms. Yingling is telling her story to anyone willing to listen. Her husband, who is not infected, supports her efforts, she said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Sarah Hainesworth, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2013
When his private dentist passed away, Henry Yeakel quickly searched for a new dental home. While some might have thumbed through a phone book to find the closest provider, Yeakel didn't have that luxury. He needed a dentist who could cater to his unique dental needs. "My teeth were brittle and breaking and falling apart," said Yeakel, who was diagnosed with AIDS in 1997. "I guess all the medication I was on probably destroyed my teeth. " It used to take Yeakel more than 30 minutes to complete his daily regimen of medication, which consisted of 32 pills twice a day. Yeakel's search for a new dentist led him to the Plus clinic at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | May 16, 1991
A Johns Hopkins Hospital specialist says that fears of AIDS patients and doctors afraid of contracting the disease have kept more than half of Maryland AIDS patients from receiving the anti-viral drug AZT that could prolong their lives.Dr. Richard E. Chaisson, director of the hospital's AIDS patient care, said yesterday that AIDS patients fear anemia and other much-publicized debilitating side effects and doctors who fear they will contract AIDS refuse to treat these patients "they do not feel comfortable with."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2013
Baltimore author Sheri Booker sees dead people. In her mind's eye, she can clearly remember the 600-pound man whose corpse had to be hoisted by a crane out of his apartment window, the teenage suicide victim who tattooed instructions about his funeral arrangements onto his arm, and the thug whose death incited a brawl that erupted at his viewing and continued into the street. Booker, who now is 31, began working at the Wylie Funeral Home in West Baltimore in 1997 at age 15, partly as a way of coping with her grief over the death of a beloved aunt.
NEWS
By Susan Baer | December 17, 1990
The senior surgeon at an operation in which Dr. Rudolph Almaraz reportedly contracted AIDS says there has never been any surgical accident in his career "that could have put me or my colleagues at risk for contracting AIDS."Dr. William Knapper of New York's Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center said in a written statement to The Sun, "It is clear that the case in question was a routine procedure that was performed with our full knowledge of the patient having AIDS."Dr. Almaraz, a prominent breast cancer surgeon at Johns Hopkins Hospital, died of acquired immune deficiency syndrome last month.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | June 14, 1991
Dr. Richard T. Johnson, a neuroscientist whose research has uncovered disorders of AIDS in the brain, promises to bring an extra dimension to the chairmanship of the new Governor's Council on HIV Prevention and Treatment.The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that causes AIDS.The new council will have a leader who has an intimate knowledge of the biology of acquired immune deficiency syndrome -- one who knows how it is transmitted, how the virus works and what the legitimate concerns are.The Schaefer administration announced yesterday that Johnson would head the new panel.
NEWS
December 5, 1990
A study quoted by a Johns Hopkins doctor says that a surgeon operating on an AIDS patient has a 0.2 percent chance of catching the disease from an accidental skin prick, and that the chance of transmitting an infection from doctor to patient is smaller still. That is a statistic the estimated 1,800 women treated by Dr. Rudolph Almaraz before he died of AIDS should keep in mind.Discovering that your surgeon had AIDS, though, is jolting. But the statistical probabilities should allay the fears of many such patients.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | November 27, 1992
Linda R. Stromberg gave her "AIDS 101" course Monday at St. Joseph Catholic Community in Sykesville.Ms. Stromberg, Carroll County's only caseworker for AIDS patients, repeats the lecture whenever she is asked because she believes "the more we talk about AIDS, the more we prevent it."About 60 people listened intently as Ms. Stromberg described the course of the disease from initial infection to the complete breakdown of the body's immune system."It's a controversial topic that many prefer to ignore," said Nancy Birck, chairman of the church's newly formed AIDS ministry.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | December 7, 1992
Every day, a young man faithfully visited his brother, an AIDS patient at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He dealt with the stress of AIDS alone and never revealed his brother's fatal illness to any co-worker.When he saw his boss in the waiting room, he went to the nurses' station in a panic."What if she sees me?" he asked Kevin Mallison, a clinical nurse on Osler 8, the AIDS unit. "She'll know I know someone with AIDS.""I told him he needed to talk to his boss," said Mr. Mallison. "Her son was dying of AIDS, too."
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | August 1, 1994
Addicted to heroin and sick from AIDS, Deborah Barnes had used up her money, her friends' hospitality and her family's ability to cope. For the past few years, her home had been wherever she could lie down, often in a vacant building.But three months ago, with a little help, the 42-year-old former waitress found a place in which to settle -- with an unusual foster family in a small brick house in East Baltimore. Hundreds of other Marylanders with AIDS are not as fortunate.Ms. Barnes is a participant in C.A.R.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2011
Robert Stone was a healthy baby until he was 13 months old. Then, over three or four days, he became unresponsive and lost the use of his limbs. His bewildered parents put him through one medical test after another, each yielding inconclusive results. The tests have remained mostly inconclusive for the past 13 years. The next step for the Stone family is to pay to have the boy's genetic material mapped in an attempt to find the cause of his illness. But that costs a minimum of $7,500, and insurance doesn't cover it. So the family has turned to the Internet and a new Baltimore startup — a nonprofit founded by a Johns Hopkins University graduate student — for help.
HEALTH
December 17, 2009
The Baltimore County Health Department has received an additional $160,930 in federal funding to provide more rental assistance to people with AIDS, bringing the total appropriation through 2010 to nearly $2 million. The program offers transportation, education, employment services and counseling to low-income residents coping with HIV and AIDS. The additional funds will mean at least eight more housing vouchers for a total of 100 in 2010, in addition to other support services. No county matching funds are required.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | May 8, 2008
The Rev. Richard Wise Shreffler, who had pastored the First Presbyterian Church of Bel Air for more than 30 years and was also active in Baltimore homeless and AIDS ministries, died May 1 of pneumonia at his home in San Antonio, Texas. He was 88. Mr. Shreffler was born and raised in Shelby, Ohio. After earning a bachelor's degree in 1942 from the College of Wooster in Wooster, Ohio, he entered Naval Training School at Annapolis. Commissioned as an officer in 1943, he participated in the D-Day invasion and was later assigned to the Pacific theater of operations.
NEWS
January 6, 2008
Upper Chesapeake Health has started a new support group for children whose parents or grandparents have cancer, called CLIMB (Children's Lives include Moments of Bravery). The group will meet from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center The support group will also meet from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Jan. 15, Jan. 22 and Jan. 29 at the Walter and Betty Ward YMCA in Abingdon. Registration is required at 800-515-0044. Patients to explore energy healing Upper Chesapeake Health has started a new support group for those affected by cancer who are interested in exploring energy healing.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 3, 2007
CHICAGO -- Shark fin soup might taste good. But it won't do much for cancer. Shark cartilage, a widely used alternative therapy for cancer, did not help patients with lung cancer live longer, according to the results of one of the first rigorous studies of the approach. But two smaller studies showed some preliminary but encouraging evidence that two other complementary therapies, ginseng and flaxseed, might have some benefit for cancer patients. The studies were presented yesterday at the annual meeting of the American Society for Clinical Oncology, where the nation's cancer doctors usually discuss the latest in chemotherapy and new biotechnology drugs.
NEWS
June 1, 2007
The Red Devils, a nonprofit volunteer organization, will sponsor its fifth Red Devils Heat and Sole Stroll at 10 a.m. Sunday, rain or shine, at Centennial Lake in Ellicott City. Registration is to begin at 9 a.m. The 2.4-mile walk around the lake will help raise money for support services for Maryland breast cancer patients and their families. The organization pays for transportation to medical appointments and helps pay for co-payments for prescription drugs, house-cleaning, meals and groceries.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella | December 7, 1990
Dr. Rudolph Almaraz, the Johns Hopkins breast cancer surgeon who died of AIDS last month, continued to operate on patients after he knew he had the disease, his widow said yesterday.Speaking publicly for the first time, Betty Almaraz defended his decision in an interview with The Sun."He was a talented and gifted man. The risks [of his transmitting AIDS to his patients] are minimal. My husband saved many, many lives, weighed against the infinitesimal risk," said Mrs. Almaraz, whose husband, Rudolph, died Nov. 16. "If he had stuck anyone at all, he would have been the first to tell anyone."
NEWS
By Gerri Kobren and Jean Marbella Reporter Holly Selby contributed to this article | December 2, 1990
A widely respected surgeon who specialized in treating women with breast cancer died of AIDS two weeks ago, and Johns Hopkins Hospital is planning to send letters this week offering free AIDS tests to an estimated 1,800 patients on whom he operated.The doctor, Rudolph Almaraz, died Nov. 16 at age 41.Confirmation that Dr. Almaraz died of AIDS came Friday when his family's lawyer, Marvin Ellin, told The Sun, "He had AIDS, and he died of AIDS."Mr. Ellin said Dr. Almaraz told him he was exposed to the disease in the course of operating on an AIDS patient in New York about seven years ago while on a fellowship at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.
NEWS
By JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF and JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF,SUN REPORTER | July 13, 2006
WASHINGTON -- AIDS and HIV patients, who have been seeking ever simpler treatments since struggling with a complicated regimen of as many as 25 pills a day a decade ago, can now take one daily pill. The new pill, Atripla, was approved yesterday by the Food and Drug Administration after an accelerated three-month review reflecting the major public health benefits anticipated by activists, doctors and health officials. Dr. Andrew C. von Eschenbach, the acting FDA commissioner, hailed the combination drug as a "landmark" that would "fundamentally change treatment" of acquired immune deficiency syndrome and the virus causing it. Since the difficult early days of treatment, AIDS cocktails have become simple enough that some patients swallow just a few medications a day. Atripla melds three widely prescribed drugs that have been available for several years and are often taken together.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 9, 2005
ORLANDO, Fla. - A large clinical trial has showed that lowering cholesterol in heart patients well below guidelines can significantly reduce heart attacks and strokes, although the five-year study did not show an overall reduction in deaths. The results, presented here yesterday, have increased the growing clamor to substantially lower cholesterol targets in heart patients, with some cardiologists suggesting there might not be a level that's too low. But others have advocated a more cautious approach, saying more research is needed before cholesterol guidelines are changed.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.