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NEWS
April 1, 1993
Infected with AIDS, Catherine Williams was consumed with worry. Her concern was not about her approaching death, but about the fate of her four-year-old daughter Elizabeth, also infected with the AIDS virus. When Ms. Williams dies, Elizabeth will be an orphan.Her worry has ended. Ms. Williams has found a Carroll County family that will take in both her and Elizabeth, although a great many legal issues have to be settled first.Ms. Williams is not alone. There are as many as 144 women in Maryland who find themselves in the same situation.
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Special to The Aegis | December 22, 2011
It's not news when people and businesses are welcoming and giving at Christmas. Mike Barone and the staff at Fortunato Brothers, at 1301 Churchville Road in Bel Air, however, have been making it Christmas all year long for a group of Harford County individuals with unique needs. Three times a year, this pleasant family eatery hosts holiday parties for a loud, laughing, hugging group called Beyond Capernaum. Beyond Capernaum is a ministry run by the high school youth group at Mt. Zion United Methodist Church at 1643 E. Churchville Road in Bel Air. Youth Director Terri Cooney, the mother of several special needs adults, founded the group in response to great need in the community.
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NEWS
By Boston Globe | December 23, 1992
BOSTON -- The number of U.S. children and teen-agers orphaned by AIDS will top 80,000 by the end of the decade, rivaling the family-shattering impact of cancer and motor vehicle accidents, according to a study published today.Unlike in many other fatal diseases and accidental death, however, the loss of a parent from acquired immune deficiency syndrome leaves behind children who are especially vulnerable, ashamed of their plight and in need of customized programs, say the study's authors and others who are beginning to monitor the problem.
NEWS
June 29, 2011
Thomas McDonough of Towson, asks if U.S. taxpayer dollars sent to fight AIDS in Africa are not better used right here in Baltimore or Detroit, at least for now ("African AIDS money better spent at home," June 25). Senora McGuire of Dundalk deplores the money Michelle Obama and family have wasted on their recent Africa trip ("How can we afford First Lady's trip to Africa?" June 28). While referring to AIDS activists talking to the First lady about the plight of AIDS victims, Ms. McGuire says that AIDS will long be with us and there is no use talking about it. It is a testament to the medical community and AIDS activists that people like Mr. McDonough and Ms. McGuire can make light of AIDS this way. AIDS is treatable as a chronic illness for now. Antiviral use is more widespread, science is supplanting superstition in Africa, whole populations of people are not being decimated, and AIDS orphans hopefully will grow less staggeringly large in number.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | January 10, 2005
In Baltimore City AIDS orphans to be topic of exhibit at Pratt An interactive art exhibit featuring works and stories of AIDS orphans from Africa, Asia, Latin America and the United States will be presented Saturday through Feb. 26 at the central Enoch Pratt Free Library, 400 Cathedral St. "The Children Left Behind: AIDS Orphans Around the World," is sponsored by Baltimore-based Catholic Relief Services. In addition to artwork and stories, it includes information on the global impact of the disease, an interactive kiosk featuring an informative video game, a short documentary, and a letter-writing station for visitors.
EXPLORE
Special to The Aegis | December 22, 2011
It's not news when people and businesses are welcoming and giving at Christmas. Mike Barone and the staff at Fortunato Brothers, at 1301 Churchville Road in Bel Air, however, have been making it Christmas all year long for a group of Harford County individuals with unique needs. Three times a year, this pleasant family eatery hosts holiday parties for a loud, laughing, hugging group called Beyond Capernaum. Beyond Capernaum is a ministry run by the high school youth group at Mt. Zion United Methodist Church at 1643 E. Churchville Road in Bel Air. Youth Director Terri Cooney, the mother of several special needs adults, founded the group in response to great need in the community.
NEWS
June 29, 2011
Thomas McDonough of Towson, asks if U.S. taxpayer dollars sent to fight AIDS in Africa are not better used right here in Baltimore or Detroit, at least for now ("African AIDS money better spent at home," June 25). Senora McGuire of Dundalk deplores the money Michelle Obama and family have wasted on their recent Africa trip ("How can we afford First Lady's trip to Africa?" June 28). While referring to AIDS activists talking to the First lady about the plight of AIDS victims, Ms. McGuire says that AIDS will long be with us and there is no use talking about it. It is a testament to the medical community and AIDS activists that people like Mr. McDonough and Ms. McGuire can make light of AIDS this way. AIDS is treatable as a chronic illness for now. Antiviral use is more widespread, science is supplanting superstition in Africa, whole populations of people are not being decimated, and AIDS orphans hopefully will grow less staggeringly large in number.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | October 8, 2006
LIFELEKOANENG, Lesotho --Every day he cooks porridge for his siblings, sees them off to school and gets them to bed. He tracks his 8-year-old brother's recovery from tuberculosis. He deals with misbehavior like his 11-year-old sister's theft of a neighbor's chicken. "I feel like an adult," Rapelang Ntsane said, gazing vacantly at the houses scattered around this windswept village in southern Africa, "because every problem here at home has been tackled by me." Rapelang is 15 years old. Disheveled, shoeless and gloomy about life's cruelty, he gamely tries to maintain some household order, if not much comfort or cleanliness, for his little sister and brother.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff Writer | December 22, 1992
The pictures in Laurel Zaks' scrapbook will turn your stomach.A 6-year-old who looks like a frail 16-month-old baby crouches by several small boys whose bodies are twisted in fantastic positions, the result of severe malnutrition and rickets.Ms. Zaks, 23, of Severna Park, returned recently from Romania, where she worked as a dietitian and nutritionist with a six-person volunteer medical team.She spent several months visiting orphanages and hospitals, working with young people ages 4 to 21 who have suffered horribly from near-starvation and neglect.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,Sun foreign reporter | August 5, 2007
Lifelekoaneng, Lesotho-- --She sat staring at me, her gaze more vacant than hard. Numb, maybe. Her feet were a dirty whitish, as if caked in chalk. A breeze rushed through the broken windows of her little house, billowing the tattered curtains. Her last meal, a bowl of porridge eaten the previous afternoon, was but a memory. It was almost noon. "Are you hungry?" I asked Itumeleng Ntsane, an AIDS orphan who had just turned 13. The answer was obvious before she nodded and quietly said yes. How could this happen, I wondered.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,Sun foreign reporter | August 5, 2007
Lifelekoaneng, Lesotho-- --She sat staring at me, her gaze more vacant than hard. Numb, maybe. Her feet were a dirty whitish, as if caked in chalk. A breeze rushed through the broken windows of her little house, billowing the tattered curtains. Her last meal, a bowl of porridge eaten the previous afternoon, was but a memory. It was almost noon. "Are you hungry?" I asked Itumeleng Ntsane, an AIDS orphan who had just turned 13. The answer was obvious before she nodded and quietly said yes. How could this happen, I wondered.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | October 8, 2006
LIFELEKOANENG, Lesotho --Every day he cooks porridge for his siblings, sees them off to school and gets them to bed. He tracks his 8-year-old brother's recovery from tuberculosis. He deals with misbehavior like his 11-year-old sister's theft of a neighbor's chicken. "I feel like an adult," Rapelang Ntsane said, gazing vacantly at the houses scattered around this windswept village in southern Africa, "because every problem here at home has been tackled by me." Rapelang is 15 years old. Disheveled, shoeless and gloomy about life's cruelty, he gamely tries to maintain some household order, if not much comfort or cleanliness, for his little sister and brother.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | January 10, 2005
In Baltimore City AIDS orphans to be topic of exhibit at Pratt An interactive art exhibit featuring works and stories of AIDS orphans from Africa, Asia, Latin America and the United States will be presented Saturday through Feb. 26 at the central Enoch Pratt Free Library, 400 Cathedral St. "The Children Left Behind: AIDS Orphans Around the World," is sponsored by Baltimore-based Catholic Relief Services. In addition to artwork and stories, it includes information on the global impact of the disease, an interactive kiosk featuring an informative video game, a short documentary, and a letter-writing station for visitors.
NEWS
April 1, 1993
Infected with AIDS, Catherine Williams was consumed with worry. Her concern was not about her approaching death, but about the fate of her four-year-old daughter Elizabeth, also infected with the AIDS virus. When Ms. Williams dies, Elizabeth will be an orphan.Her worry has ended. Ms. Williams has found a Carroll County family that will take in both her and Elizabeth, although a great many legal issues have to be settled first.Ms. Williams is not alone. There are as many as 144 women in Maryland who find themselves in the same situation.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | December 23, 1992
BOSTON -- The number of U.S. children and teen-agers orphaned by AIDS will top 80,000 by the end of the decade, rivaling the family-shattering impact of cancer and motor vehicle accidents, according to a study published today.Unlike in many other fatal diseases and accidental death, however, the loss of a parent from acquired immune deficiency syndrome leaves behind children who are especially vulnerable, ashamed of their plight and in need of customized programs, say the study's authors and others who are beginning to monitor the problem.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff Writer | December 22, 1992
The pictures in Laurel Zaks' scrapbook will turn your stomach.A 6-year-old who looks like a frail 16-month-old baby crouches by several small boys whose bodies are twisted in fantastic positions, the result of severe malnutrition and rickets.Ms. Zaks, 23, of Severna Park, returned recently from Romania, where she worked as a dietitian and nutritionist with a six-person volunteer medical team.She spent several months visiting orphanages and hospitals, working with young people ages 4 to 21 who have suffered horribly from near-starvation and neglect.
NEWS
November 15, 2009
St Martin's in the Field Episcopal Church will hold this event from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dec. 5 at 375 Benfield Road in Severna Park. Candles, wreaths, jewelry, wood crafts and flower arrangements are among the available items. In addition, African jewelry and carvings will be sold to benefit AIDS orphans in Africa, and a White Elephant Sale will be held. For directions and more information, call 410-544-3222.
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