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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | November 29, 1990
In Baltimore as elsewhere, "Day Without Art 1990" is going to be a day with art. Exhibits, performance art, the AIDS Memorial Quilt and a quilt-making workshop are among the activities planned around the second annual Day Without Art observance on Saturday.Organized nationally by Visual AIDS, a New York-based group of art professionals, this year's day coincides with the World Health Organization's AIDS Awareness Day.According to organizers, "Day Without Art 1990" is intended to remember those who've died from acquired immune deficiency syndrome, "to educate the public about HIV infection, and to encourage action to cure and care for all people with AIDS everywhere."
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By ALAN ZAREMBO and ALAN ZAREMBO,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 4, 2006
ATLANTA -- She is constantly sewing. Hunched over pieces of the quilt, the seamstress stitches fraying edges and little tears that have accumulated over the years. When she is finished mending a piece, she folds the fabric and carries it into a long, quiet gallery. Metal shelves stretch the length of the room. Each shelf holds five 12-foot-square blocks of quilt. Each block is made of eight panels. Each panel, the size of a grave, contains a name. "There are some spots that are really faded, that you can barely see anymore," said the seamstress.
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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 7, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Mary Fisher, the AIDS-infected woman from Florida who spoke so movingly at the Republican National Convention in August, is taking Earvin "Magic" Johnson's seat on the National Commission on AIDS, sources confirmed yesterday.The White House is expected to announce the appointment today. Ms. Fisher will be the only member of the advisory panel with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.Mr. Johnson, a basketball star who has the virus that is linked to AIDS, resigned from the commission last month and criticized President Bush for not following its recommendations.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 10, 2004
For those who use theaters to escape unpleasantness of the real world -- and such a motivation sure is understandable these days -- Meyerhoff Symphony Hall was not a good place to be Saturday night. Reality filled the space in grim, visceral fashion. The event, which deserved a much bigger audience, was the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's final Symphony With a Twist program of the season. The concert focused on two composers known for using their music to challenge and confront -- Beethoven, represented by his boldly declamatory Piano Concerto No. 5, and John Corigiliano, by his Symphony No. 1, an anguished response to the toll of AIDS.
FEATURES
November 4, 1991
Some 200 panels from the NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt will be on view in the Glass Pavilion at Johns Hopkins University today through next Monday.The quilt was begun in 1987 when Cleve Jones of San Francisco spray-painted a piece of cloth as a memorial to his friend, Marvin Feldman, who had died of AIDS. Since then the quilt has grown to more than 14,000 panels, covering in their entirety an area larger than 5 1/2 football fields.The quilt will be on public view noon to 8 p.m. today and 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. tomorrow through next Monday.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1996
Howard "Buddy" Gaguski was a Dr. Seuss fanatic. He loved old-line Episcopalian hymns and silk smoking jackets. He kept ,, order at Chase-Brexton Health Services, where he worked as a nurse tending to HIV patients, and at Emmanuel Episcopal Church in Bel Air, where he was the parish organist. He was a sympathetic healer, the kind of nurse who kept a stash of candy for patients and colleagues.When he died of AIDS last December at 45, Gaguski left behind his devoted Yorkshire dog, Max, and many loving friends.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | April 12, 1998
When Lisa Hurka-Covington of Towson stands on the Capitol steps in Washington this week, she will be keeping alive precious memories as she unveils Maryland's first suicide quilt and recites the names.Her sister, Laura Anne Hurka; John and Jody White, husband and son of author Susan White-Bowden; 12-year-old John Tolzman of Riderwood; 32-year-old Wes Hewitt of Bel Air. And too many more.Hurka-Covington will be among more than 25 state coordinators displaying memorial quilts embossed with photos of loved ones Friday.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | September 14, 1993
Howard County residents who have lost a loved one to the AIDS epidemic can make an emotional statement about their loss by sewing panels for the international AIDS Memorial Quilt, beginning this Saturday.And in December, residents will get a chance to view portions of the larger quilt at Howard Community College to mark World AIDS Day, an event intended to promote education about the disease.The 10-acre quilt is a product of the NAMES Project Foundation, a San Francisco-based group that has stitched together panels bearing the names of more than 25,000 who have died of acquired immune deficiency syndrome.
NEWS
By Henry Scarupa | June 5, 1991
James Schuman and Colleen Bowers have dedicated themselves in recent days to plying needle and thread, their urgency prompted by the return to Baltimore today of the NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt.The two quilters, who belong to the Presbyterian AIDS Network and sing together in the choir at Brown Memorial Park Avenue United Presbyterian Church, have been hurrying to complete three new panels, honoring friends who have died recently of acquired immune deficiency syndrome.Theirs will be among 100 new panels created by local churches and faith communities for dedication during the quilt's stay here in connection with the AIDSWALK '91 fund-raiser Sunday.
NEWS
By From staff reports | February 26, 1997
At the urging of the Baltimore Teachers Union, the city Department of Education is assembling a task force of students, teachers and administrators to rewrite school discipline rules.The BTU proposed a discipline code last year, calling for clear-cut consequences for violence and disruption.Approved by the city school board last week, the task force will collaborate with the BTU to review state and local policies on suspension and discipline and propose new guidelines.Police say stranglings of two women unrelatedTwo women have been found strangled in vacant buildings on the same West Baltimore block since January, but a police spokeswoman said yesterday no evidence has been found to suggest the slayings are related.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2002
With AIDS cases on the rise in Carroll, the county Health Department has organized an observance the day after World AIDS Day to raise awareness, stress preventive measures and offer reminders that, despite life-prolonging advances in treatment, the epidemic is spreading. A panel from the AIDS Memorial Quilt will provide the backdrop for the two-hour event tomorrow at the department's offices in Westminster. The staff will give a primer on acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Visitors will see exhibits and pamphlets that list statistics, and a college theater troupe will perform skits that stress safe sex. An AIDS patient will speak.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 4, 1999
Boisterous students rushed into the Westminster High School library yesterday, expecting to take a quick look at the AIDS memorial quilt and dash off an assignment.But faced with this sad piece of Americana, they fell silent before pictures and relics of the dead."It goes from a rumble to a silence every time," said Margaret Cush, health and physical education teacher at the Carroll County school."Kids don't know what to expect; they are usually just happy to get out of class," said Pam Shurkin, a member of the Maryland Association of Student Councils who organized the first statewide high school quilt tour.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 4, 1999
Boisterous students rushed into the Westminster High School library yesterday, expecting to take a quick look at the AIDS memorial quilt and dash off an assignment.But faced with this sad piece of Americana, they fell silent before pictures and relics of the dead."It goes from a rumble to a silence every time," said Margaret Cush, health and physical education teacher at the Carroll County school."Kids don't know what to expect; they are usually just happy to get out of class," said Pam Shurkin, a member of the Maryland Association of Student Councils who organized the first statewide high school quilt tour.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | April 12, 1998
When Lisa Hurka-Covington of Towson stands on the Capitol steps in Washington this week, she will be keeping alive precious memories as she unveils Maryland's first suicide quilt and recites the names.Her sister, Laura Anne Hurka; John and Jody White, husband and son of author Susan White-Bowden; 12-year-old John Tolzman of Riderwood; 32-year-old Wes Hewitt of Bel Air. And too many more.Hurka-Covington will be among more than 25 state coordinators displaying memorial quilts embossed with photos of loved ones Friday.
NEWS
By From staff reports | February 26, 1997
At the urging of the Baltimore Teachers Union, the city Department of Education is assembling a task force of students, teachers and administrators to rewrite school discipline rules.The BTU proposed a discipline code last year, calling for clear-cut consequences for violence and disruption.Approved by the city school board last week, the task force will collaborate with the BTU to review state and local policies on suspension and discipline and propose new guidelines.Police say stranglings of two women unrelatedTwo women have been found strangled in vacant buildings on the same West Baltimore block since January, but a police spokeswoman said yesterday no evidence has been found to suggest the slayings are related.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1996
WASHINGTON -- On a chilly, breath-fogged morning, nine Baltimore school children held hands and shivered around an intricately folded section of the AIDS Memorial Quilt.The students waited quietly yesterday for Cleve Jones, founder of the San Francisco-based Names Project Foundation, to begin reading the names of the dead. Then the seventh and eighth graders from Friends School began to part panels that were folded together like the petals of a lotus.When each section was open, they lifted it, carried it in a quarter turn and placed it gently on the cold, glistening grass.
NEWS
By Angela Winter Ney and Angela Winter Ney,Staff writer | October 5, 1993
The panel of the AIDS memorial quilt is backed with a stark gray fabric. A well-worn back pocket from a pair of blue jeans holds a purple bandanna. Nearby is a packet of playing cards, a small square that advertises "The S&M Market" and a condom packet that reads: "Safer sex is for everyone."The grim panel stands out among the brightly colored patches of the NAMES Project AIDS quilt on display at Anne Arundel Community College.Five of the quilt's 23,000, 12-foot by 12-foot panels are at the college through Wednesday, part of a week of AIDS-awareness programs.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2002
With AIDS cases on the rise in Carroll, the county Health Department has organized an observance the day after World AIDS Day to raise awareness, stress preventive measures and offer reminders that, despite life-prolonging advances in treatment, the epidemic is spreading. A panel from the AIDS Memorial Quilt will provide the backdrop for the two-hour event tomorrow at the department's offices in Westminster. The staff will give a primer on acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Visitors will see exhibits and pamphlets that list statistics, and a college theater troupe will perform skits that stress safe sex. An AIDS patient will speak.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1996
Howard "Buddy" Gaguski was a Dr. Seuss fanatic. He loved old-line Episcopalian hymns and silk smoking jackets. He kept ,, order at Chase-Brexton Health Services, where he worked as a nurse tending to HIV patients, and at Emmanuel Episcopal Church in Bel Air, where he was the parish organist. He was a sympathetic healer, the kind of nurse who kept a stash of candy for patients and colleagues.When he died of AIDS last December at 45, Gaguski left behind his devoted Yorkshire dog, Max, and many loving friends.
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1995
The AIDS Memorial Quilt has come to Bel Air High School, but not many people can talk about it.At the high school, teachers can discuss AIDS with the school's 1,300 students, but school administrators have prohibited them from using the quilt to talk about the danger of high-risk sexual practices. Condoms can be mentioned only in connection with birth control.Elsewhere in the district, teachers are free to tell their students that the quilt is at Bel Air High. But they can't say anything else.
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