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By Samuel Goldreich and Samuel Goldreich,Staff writer | January 19, 1992
Several parents complained to the school board last week that the county's policy of promoting sexual abstinence has been undermined by AIDS education efforts.The debate comes one month after members ofBel Air High School's Contemporary Health class asked the school board to allow education in middle school grades about the importance ofcondoms for safe sex.Educating students about condoms undercuts the promotion of abstinence as the only certain way to prevent the spread of the AIDS virus, said Nancy Jacobs, state representative for Concerned Women for America, a group that opposes abortion.
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NEWS
December 8, 2011
Darwin was not his given name. He was being treated for HIV/AIDS at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. As the hospital's senior chaplain, I visited him often. He was in tears as he told me that when his disease was known to his family he was rejected. When he went to church one Sunday, he was met by the pastor and two church officials at the door, and they denied him the right to enter the church. Again, he cried for being turned away. As his condition worsened I visited him daily. As I entered his room one day I was surprised to see him holding a teddy bear in his arms.
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NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1996
Carroll County Health Department has initiated an AIDS education and prevention program aimed at two groups of underserved county jail inmates: those who are at-risk for contracting the virus that causes AIDS and HIV-positive inmates who are in danger of spreading the disease to others.A part-time community health nurse based at the Carroll County Detention Center will work with members of both groups on an individual basis to provide health assessments, prevention counseling and case-management services, said Debbie Middleton, the county's supervisor of communicable diseases.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | August 22, 2010
"I'm a conservative, but I'm not mad at everybody over it. " — Mike Huckabee I'm writing this to say just one thing: I like Mike. That would be Michael Dale Huckabee, former Baptist preacher, former governor of Arkansas, former GOP presidential candidate, current Fox News personality, the guy quoted above being flagrantly reasonable during an interview on "The Daily Show. " I like Mike. The proximate reason I say that is his recent refusal to support a knuckleheaded idea being touted by many of his conservative brethren: altering the 14th Amendment to curtail illegal immigration.
NEWS
By Brian Sullam and Brian Sullam,Staff writer | February 16, 1992
High school students who want to learn about AIDS, contraception and other sex-related issues at public school will have to get permission from a parent first.That new policy was adopted by the Board of Education Monday in response to pressure from parents who complained that the past policy stigmatized" students because their parents had to submit written requests for their children to be excused from those sessions.The board approved the measure, 5-1. Board member Anne Sterling voted against it.In addition, the board said that high schools can use the play "Secrets" as part of their AIDS education curriculum if a controversial picnic scene is eliminated.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | November 12, 1992
The Carroll County school system will be one administrator short for at least the rest of this year, with two supervisors picking up the duties of David Miller, who left as head of vocational and technology education for a post in Frederick County.Superintendent R. Edward Shilling told the Board of Education yesterday that he decided not to replace Mr. Miller because of expected reductions of $2.5 million to $3.8 million in money coming from the state.Marjorie Lohnes, formerly supervisor of home economics and health education, will continue to supervise home economics and add most of Mr. Miller's duties to her work load.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | November 19, 1992
A play about AIDS called "Secrets" has angered a group of parents who wants county high schools to stop using it as a tool for teaching about the disease.Bishop Thomas R. Winings of the Ellicott City Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints became upset after his daughter saw the play at Centennial High School last month. Although he had sent a letter asking that she be excluded from AIDS education, a teacher forgot to forward his slip to school administrators, principal Sylvia Pattillo said.
NEWS
By Michael J. Clark and Michael J. Clark,Howard County Bureau of The Sun | September 29, 1991
A 37-member AIDS task force is recommending that the Howard County Health Department establish a clinic to monitor people infected with the virus that causes the fatal disease, expand community education and establish support services for people who are infected with the virus."
NEWS
December 8, 2011
Darwin was not his given name. He was being treated for HIV/AIDS at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. As the hospital's senior chaplain, I visited him often. He was in tears as he told me that when his disease was known to his family he was rejected. When he went to church one Sunday, he was met by the pastor and two church officials at the door, and they denied him the right to enter the church. Again, he cried for being turned away. As his condition worsened I visited him daily. As I entered his room one day I was surprised to see him holding a teddy bear in his arms.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | May 26, 1991
Tina K. Krasnodemski sees the county's education system from two perspectives.The 18-year-old Pylesville resident is a graduating senior at North Harford High School. She also is the student representative on the county Board of Education.Tina finishes her one-year term on the eight-member education board in June. The position requires her to attend as many as seven school board meetings and hearings in a month, many of which can last hours.The senior was elected to the school board by the county Regional Association of Student Councils, which is made up of representatives from Harford's high schools.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin | October 26, 2008
In separate book clubs, Angie Jones and Martha Banghart read the book Three Cups of Tea: One Man's Mission to Promote Peace...One School at a Time. In the book, Greg Mortenson, co-writer with David Oliver Relin, gives a detailed account of his failed attempt to climb to the top of K2, the world's second-highest mountain. But then he succeeds in building schools in some of the most remote regions of Afghanistan and Pakistan. Jones and Banghart, who serve as choral directors in the county's public school system, were so touched by the book they were inspired to do something to help.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,sun reporter | April 6, 2007
When Doug and Carole Bruns look around their neat, blue-walled gallery space on Main Street in Ellicott City, they see more than a showplace for photographs. The newly opened f64 gallery is the Fulton couple's latest joint venture, their "empty nest" project and the fulfillment of a longtime desire of Doug Bruns to delve more deeply into fine-art photography. It is also a way to raise money for a foundation they started, which funds efforts to send young people from the United States to other countries for educational and public service projects.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,[Special to the Sun] | January 14, 2007
Kevin Jaros, a 15-year-old with multiple disabilities, needs an escort to find his way to the school bus. To teach him about the human digestive system, his teacher, Tammy Wolanin, created the stomach, intestines and other parts in colors and textures Kevin can recognize and then stick into place on a model. He has to repeat the task over and over again to pass the alternative Maryland State Assessment -- also known as the alt-MSA -- the state's version of standardized testing for special education students.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2003
Annapolis should offer tax relief to low-income residents and provide additional education about available tax breaks, a task force will tell the city council at a meeting tonight. "I just don't think people understand the programs that are out there," said task force member Fred Puddester, a former state budget secretary. "They're somewhat complicated." The council created the task force to review tax credits for fixed-income residents "in order to offset excessive assessments," the report states.
NEWS
By Chalya Lar | July 11, 2002
BARCELONA, Spain - "One more day, please." It's a plea I hear every time I return to Africa, a plea from mothers dying of AIDS who need time to find someone to care for their children after they die. And it's a plea that should echo in the ears of each of the 17,000 delegates during this week's International AIDS Conference in Barcelona. Regrettably, the voices of thousands of African women will be silenced forever as delegates mix discussion on AIDS with sun, Catalan culture and paella in Barcelona.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 30, 2001
BEIJING - One bright, clear morning in March, people gathered in Donghu, a farming village in Central China's Henan Province, to take part in an increasingly frequent ritual - the burial of one of their own. They lifted the wooden casket bearing the body of Feng Dongyuan, 41, and carried it about 500 yards to a grassy area. Unable to afford a proper marker of their own, the family stuck a 6-foot tree branch into the earth to mark the spot. Last month, Feng's wife, Mei Yuerong, died, leaving behind their three children; two boys, age 15 and 9, and a girl, age 7. They were made orphans by a mysterious illness once known in this region as guai bing, or "the strange disease."
NEWS
November 23, 1992
Western Maryland College will observe World AIDS Day, Dec. 1, with several events to promote knowledge of the deadly disease.World AIDS Day is an international response to the global spread of acquired immune deficiency syndrome crisis. A Western Maryland senior organized the campus events for a class project.The campus observance will include "Day Without Art," in which sheets will be placed over many works of art at the college, and "Night Without Light," in which the steeple lights on Baker Memorial Chapel will be turned off for a few minutes.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | January 11, 1994
Howard County has made progress in the fight against AIDS, but needs to do more to help AIDS patients and to educate minorities and others at high risk of contracting the disease.That's the view of Jim Mundy, chairman of the county Board of Health, who tonight will deliver the first formal assessment of the county's AIDS prevention, education and outreach programs."I think we've had successes [but] there's still some places we need to work on," said Mr. Mundy, who will join Dr. Joyce Boyd, the county health officer, in addressing the annual meeting of AIDS Alliance of Howard County.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | December 27, 2000
Baltimore's schools and legislative leaders are proposing a $55 million education aid package to Gov. Parris N. Glendening that could end the latest round of legal wrangling between the city and state. Sources familiar with the proposal - which would amount to a $22 million increase in state aid to Baltimore's schools over the current year but $46 million less than the city school board had been seeking - said the governor is generally supportive of the plan, pending negotiations over a few key details.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2000
Catonsville resident Teresa LaMaster is an unusual parent advocate in that she knows more about her cause - special education - than many of the school officials with whom she meets. A business attorney and the mother of a 4-year-old diagnosed with autism, LaMaster, who heads the Citizens' Advisory Committee for Special Education, has earned the respect and support of some of Baltimore County's top education leaders. "Teresa is really an able advocate for children with needs," said Marjorie M. Rofel, director of special education, who communicates regularly with LaMaster by telephone and e-mail.
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