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By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | August 24, 1996
Maryland will create a housing information service for people infected with the virus that causes AIDS, under a $976,800 grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.HUD Secretary Henry G. Cisneros announced the grant yesterday, along with $7 million in awards to 10 other cities and states.The Maryland grant will go to the state's AIDS Administration and will be used to give notice of available public and private housing on a toll-free phone line and on the Internet.The funds will be administered by a private, nonprofit group, the Low Income Housing Information Service.
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NEWS
By Debbie Cenziper and Debbie Cenziper,The Washington Post | October 18, 2009
WASHINGTON - - In a city ravaged by the highest rate of AIDS cases in the nation, the D.C. Health Department paid millions to nonprofit groups that delivered substandard services or failed to account for any work at all, even as sick people searched for care or died waiting. More than $1 million in AIDS money went to a housing group whose ailing boarders sometimes struggled without electricity, gas or food. A supervisor said she was ordered to create records for ghost employees. About $400,000 was paid to a nonprofit organization launched by a man who once ran one of the District's largest cocaine rings, for a promised job-training center that has never opened.
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NEWS
By Patrick Ercolano and Patrick Ercolano,Staff Writer | March 27, 1992
A forum on AIDS among blacks and Hispanics has presented statistics from 1991 showing that, for the first time ever in Baltimore County, the number of acquired immune deficiency syndrome cases among minority people exceeded the number of cases among whites.The Minority AIDS Forum was attended last night by about 100 local black and Hispanic leaders. Their stated goal is stemming the spread of the disease among minorities, largely by establishing community-based AIDS awareness programs.The program at the Liberty Family Resource Center in Randallstown was sponsored by the AIDS division of the county Department of Health and the AIDS administration of the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun reporter | February 13, 2008
Despite struggling with one of the nation's highest AIDS rates, Maryland is facing a 40 percent reduction this year in federal support to track infections - a cut that officials say could have a ripple effect on aid to treat the indigent. The cut, from $1.8 million last year to about $1 million in calendar year 2008, eliminates funding for the state to perform tests that discern whether someone testing positive for HIV was infected recently or years ago, according to the Maryland AIDS Administration.
NEWS
By KELLY BREWINGTON and KELLY BREWINGTON,SUN REPORTER | February 26, 2006
Baltimore's health commissioner and advocates for people with HIV and AIDS are concerned that shuffling budget money at the state AIDS Administration could leave the city without positions vital to help stop the spread of the virus and could force people who depend on life-sustaining drugs to do without them. The state AIDS Administration is confronting proposed budget changes beginning July 1 that could eliminate 33 employees, some of whom collect data on the prevalence of HIV and AIDS cases.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | December 4, 1991
Over a three-year period, Maryland has registered HIV-infection levels for childbearing women that are among the highest in the United States, says the state health department's AIDS Administration.Only three other states -- New York, New Jersey and Florida -- and the District of Columbia, have HIV-infection rates for childbearing women that exceed Maryland's.While the dramatic rise in rates seen between 1988 and 1989 was not repeated in 1990, the number of childbearing women infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | January 31, 1991
The state AIDS Administration now estimates that between 16,000 to 30,000 Marylanders were infected with the AIDS-causing human immunodeficiency virus at the end of 1990.The new estimate is far lower than the previous one of 70,000.AIDS Administration officials agreed yesterday that the revised estimate represents a "significant decrease" in numbers, but urged the public not to be lulled into thinking the magnitude of the state's AIDS problem has diminished."No, we don't need to do less, we need to do more," said Dr. Kathleen F. Edwards, the AIDS Administration director.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun reporter | February 13, 2008
Despite struggling with one of the nation's highest AIDS rates, Maryland is facing a 40 percent reduction this year in federal support to track infections - a cut that officials say could have a ripple effect on aid to treat the indigent. The cut, from $1.8 million last year to about $1 million in calendar year 2008, eliminates funding for the state to perform tests that discern whether someone testing positive for HIV was infected recently or years ago, according to the Maryland AIDS Administration.
NEWS
By Patrick Ercolano and Patrick Ercolano,Staff Writer | March 27, 1992
A forum on AIDS among blacks and Hispanics last night presented statistics from 1991 showing that, for the first time ever in Baltimore County, the number of acquired immune deficiency syndrome cases among minority people exceeded the number of cases among whites.The Minority AIDS Forum was attended by about 100 local black and Hispanic leaders. Their stated goal is stemming the spread of the disease among minorities, largely by establishing community-based AIDS awareness programs.The program at the Liberty Family Resource Center in Randallstown was sponsored by the county Department of Health's AIDS Division and the AIDS Administration of the state's Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
NEWS
By Debbie Cenziper and Debbie Cenziper,The Washington Post | October 18, 2009
WASHINGTON - - In a city ravaged by the highest rate of AIDS cases in the nation, the D.C. Health Department paid millions to nonprofit groups that delivered substandard services or failed to account for any work at all, even as sick people searched for care or died waiting. More than $1 million in AIDS money went to a housing group whose ailing boarders sometimes struggled without electricity, gas or food. A supervisor said she was ordered to create records for ghost employees. About $400,000 was paid to a nonprofit organization launched by a man who once ran one of the District's largest cocaine rings, for a promised job-training center that has never opened.
NEWS
By KELLY BREWINGTON and KELLY BREWINGTON,SUN REPORTER | February 26, 2006
Baltimore's health commissioner and advocates for people with HIV and AIDS are concerned that shuffling budget money at the state AIDS Administration could leave the city without positions vital to help stop the spread of the virus and could force people who depend on life-sustaining drugs to do without them. The state AIDS Administration is confronting proposed budget changes beginning July 1 that could eliminate 33 employees, some of whom collect data on the prevalence of HIV and AIDS cases.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2002
OCEAN CITY - The college financial aid administrators of Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia conclude their annual convention here today. Some 250 of them have been cooped up in a hotel since Monday, discussing such subjects as FERPA regulations, the management rules of Perkins loans and why EFC formulas and loan verifications go hand in hand. I know almost nothing about the business, but as a "convention spouse" I've been attending the regional meeting of the Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators for several years.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2001
Acknowledging that his office has done a poor job of counting the number of people in Baltimore infected with the virus that causes AIDS, the city's health commissioner has turned responsibility for that task over to state health officials. "I'm not confident we're doing it adequately," Peter L. Beilenson told a City Council committee last night. "If they can do it better, count the cases better, it's no skin off our back. " Beilenson's comments were made during a public hearing on the spread of human immunodeficiency virus, which causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome, that was called by the council's Housing, Health and Environment Committee.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | May 13, 1999
A clinic that for years has treated AIDS patients at its Mount Vernon headquarters is expanding to suburbia, reflecting a move by health care providers to treat a growing population of HIV and AIDS patients outside the city. Chase Brexton Health Services is to mark the opening today of its Pikesville offices, an expansion that occurs amid signs that specialized care for the potentially deadly disease is in high demand in the suburbs and the far-flung areas of the state. Even as Chase Brexton settles into its new location, the Johns Hopkins medical system AIDS clinic is planning to expand services at its satellite office in Baltimore County, and public health clinics on the Eastern Shore and in Western Maryland are for the first time treating patients who have human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immune deficiency syndrome.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1999
State health authorities are planning to cut federal AIDS funding in nine Maryland counties despite having 5 percent more money overall, sparking heated protests from activists and counties that stand to lose. Howard and Frederick counties would lose more than 40 percent of their Ryan White Title II funding over three years -- a combined total of $82,000 -- while Baltimore, along with Anne Arundel, Baltimore and Prince George's counties, would receive more money. Montgomery County would lose about $70,000 over the three-year period.
NEWS
By Mark Binker and Nicole L. Gill and Mark Binker and Nicole L. Gill,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | February 8, 1998
WASHINGTON - The number of new gonorrhea infections in Maryland has dropped by half in the last decade, from 24,132 cases diagnosed in 1987 to 11,316 in 1996.While health officials cannot point to any one cause for the decline, they said it is at least partly attributable to the fear of another disease - AIDS - and the safe-sex message that has come with it."I really think the predominant reason for the decline in gonorrhea cases is the prevention effort related to AIDS," said Arthur Thacher, Prince George's County's health officer.
NEWS
By GAREY LAMBERT | March 7, 1992
The Maryland General Assembly is flirting again with legislation that would compromise the privacy rights of people with AIDS. The state government says it wants mandatory testing of certain populations, particularly health-care workers, to protect the public and to help people who are infected get the treatment they need.Virtually every medical and scientific authority to have an opinion on the subject, including the federal Centers for Disease Control, says that mandatory testing will not achieve those goals.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | May 16, 1991
A Johns Hopkins Hospital specialist says that fears of AIDS patients and doctors afraid of contracting the disease have kept more than half of Maryland AIDS patients from receiving the anti-viral drug AZT that could prolong their lives.Dr. Richard E. Chaisson, director of the hospital's AIDS patient care, said yesterday that AIDS patients fear anemia and other much-publicized debilitating side effects and doctors who fear they will contract AIDS refuse to treat these patients "they do not feel comfortable with."
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | August 24, 1996
Maryland will create a housing information service for people infected with the virus that causes AIDS, under a $976,800 grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.HUD Secretary Henry G. Cisneros announced the grant yesterday, along with $7 million in awards to 10 other cities and states.The Maryland grant will go to the state's AIDS Administration and will be used to give notice of available public and private housing on a toll-free phone line and on the Internet.The funds will be administered by a private, nonprofit group, the Low Income Housing Information Service.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | May 23, 1995
Gov. Parris N. Glendening yesterday named Dr. Liza Solomon, a public health researcher and longtime advocate for AIDS patients, to run the office responsible for containing the epidemic and serving the afflicted.The appointment marks the first time that the director of the state AIDS Administration has come squarely from the activist community.Over the years, Dr. Solomon has fought former Gov. William Donald Schaefer's efforts to register the names of people who test positive for the virus that causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome -- saying it would violate privacy rights and scare people from getting care.
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