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Aids Activists

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NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | June 28, 1994
The image of AIDS activists is one of angry, in-your-face street protesters shouting from the perimeter of the scientific establishment for immediate action -- and using nearly any means to get it.But as the epidemic grinds on, shifts in method and attitude are taking place among members of the advocacy movement for victims of acquired immune deficiency syndrome.Now, many longtime activists sit beside members of the medical and scientific establishment on panels and committees. And, in sharp contrast to their urgent demands of the 1980s, they often preach caution.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2013
John W. Bunting III, a former program specialist for the state Department of Social Services who was an HIV/AIDS activist, died Nov. 5 of heart failure at his Sutton Place Apartments home. He was 69. The son of a salesman and a school teacher, John William Bunting III was born in Huntington, W.Va., and was a 1962 graduate of Barboursville High School in Barboursville, W.Va. He attended the University of Baltimore and served in the Navy from 1966 to 1968 aboard the carrier USS Independence.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 16, 2003
Six AIDS activists briefly disrupted a speech by federal Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy G. Thompson yesterday in Baltimore. As Thompson addressed a conference on illness prevention, the protesters burst into a tent in front of the Marriott Waterfront hotel where about 1,000 health officials and advocates were eating lunch. They held up posters and chanted, "AIDS is an emergency, save the Global Fund," before being led out by security guards. One of the protesters, Allison Dinsmore of Philadelphia, said later that they believe the $15 billion President Bush has pledged to the international fight against AIDS should go to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, a multinational group.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2011
Vincent Quayle knows the corrosive effect of foreclosures well, sitting as he does at the helm of a nonprofit group that helps homeowners in trouble. But he says the current foreclosure crisis is nothing compared to the damage wrought by the "blockbusting" that reshaped Baltimore and its suburbs in the 1950s and '60s. As African-American families began moving into historically white city neighborhoods, real estate investors capitalized on racial fears to persuade white homeowners to sell cheap, then rented or resold the properties for big profits to African-Americans.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 2, 1991
KENNEBUNKPORT, Maine -- Nearly 1,000 AIDS activists briefly took over the main roads of this tiny town yesterday to highlight their demand that President Bush take bolder action to combat the deadly epidemic.Although sponsored by ACT-UP, a group known for its extreme tactics, yesterday's demonstration was calm, peaceful and extremely well-organized.When parading protesters were stopped by heavily gloved Maine State Police about a quarter-mile from Mr. Bush's vacation home, they chanted for the benefit of onlookers and camera crews for about 30 minutes and then retreated quietly.
NEWS
By JOAN BECK | January 14, 1992
Chicago -- Sobersides medicine has never seen anything like the most virulent of the AIDS activists. With a raunchy blend of guerrilla theater, civil disobedience and deliberate offensiveness, groups led by ACT UP (AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power) and others have disrupted scientific meetings and shouted down the very researchers trying to help them.They have stormed into solemn worship services to protest church inaction and disrupted the New York Stock Exchange. They have taunted police.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 15, 2001
PRETORIA, South Africa - South African AIDS activists won a major court battle against their government yesterday, as a judge ruled that public health officials must supply pregnant women with a drug that can protect their babies from becoming infected with the AIDS virus. Applause and cheers filled the courtroom here when Judge Chris Botha delivered the ruling that will make the drug nevirapine available nationwide in public hospitals and clinics. For the government, yesterday's ruling was a humiliating defeat.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 23, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Rattled by a series of embarrassing demonstrations last week, members of Al Gore's campaign and White House staffs met with AIDS activists yesterday to try to persuade them that the vice president is trying to reduce the cost of AIDS drugs in Africa. But the activists emerged undaunted and unconvinced, pledging they would go forward with a planned series of protests, including an anti-Gore rally Monday night in Philadelphia. "It's full speed ahead," said Wayne Turner, a member of the AIDS group ACT-UP, who met with the Gore campaign's political director, Donna Brazile.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 24, 2004
PHILADELPHIA - Calling the worldwide spread of HIV/AIDS a "direct challenge to the compassion of our country," President Bush announced yesterday that Vietnam would be added to the list of nations eligible for emergency U.S. help in fighting the epidemic. "We're putting a history of bitterness behind us with Vietnam," Bush said, speaking at the Greater Exodus Baptist Church, a largely African-American congregation with faith-based social programs. Bush said he is poised to send $500 million more to prevent and treat the disease in Vietnam and 14 other countries in Africa and the Caribbean.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2003
A year after Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley declared a state of emergency in the battle against AIDS, health officials say they're worried that a drop in AIDS cases could lead to public complacency. "While AIDS is becoming more and more a chronic disease and less of a fatal disease, we want to avoid media fatigue from setting in and an attitude where people feel they can ignore what's still a very serious threat," said Dr. Peter L. Beilenson, city health commissioner. The number of city residents dying of AIDS has dropped steadily over the past decade, from 959 in 1993 to 93 last year, he said.
NEWS
June 29, 2011
Thomas McDonough of Towson, asks if U.S. taxpayer dollars sent to fight AIDS in Africa are not better used right here in Baltimore or Detroit, at least for now ("African AIDS money better spent at home," June 25). Senora McGuire of Dundalk deplores the money Michelle Obama and family have wasted on their recent Africa trip ("How can we afford First Lady's trip to Africa?" June 28). While referring to AIDS activists talking to the First lady about the plight of AIDS victims, Ms. McGuire says that AIDS will long be with us and there is no use talking about it. It is a testament to the medical community and AIDS activists that people like Mr. McDonough and Ms. McGuire can make light of AIDS this way. AIDS is treatable as a chronic illness for now. Antiviral use is more widespread, science is supplanting superstition in Africa, whole populations of people are not being decimated, and AIDS orphans hopefully will grow less staggeringly large in number.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 16, 2005
NEW YORK -- Drivers entering Manhattan through the Lincoln Tunnel yesterday grimaced with dismay. Were all those people really walking into the tunnel's central tube? Indeed, they were - for a cause. Carrying signs calling for an end to AIDS, more than 500 activists strolled and shouted their way under the Hudson River in what organizers described as the start of a new national movement to eradicate the virus worldwide. It took nearly an hour for the crowd to move through. Many of the marchers planned to stay on long past the tunnel's western terminus in Weehawken, N.J. Their destination was Washington, where - after three weeks of walking - they plan to meet other marchers from across the country on Nov. 4 for rallies throughout the nation's capital.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2004
Comptroller William Donald Schaefer clarified his support of a registry of people with HIV/AIDS yesterday, saying he wants a public list of only those who intentionally spread the disease to others. Under fire for stating that AIDS victims were to blame for their disease and were a danger to society in comments two weeks ago, Schaefer, speaking on the Chip Franklin Show on WBAL radio, said he is only trying to stop the spread of HIV. "To me, a woman on the street, a prostitute that intentionally gives a person AIDS, she should be on the registry," he said.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 24, 2004
PHILADELPHIA - Calling the worldwide spread of HIV/AIDS a "direct challenge to the compassion of our country," President Bush announced yesterday that Vietnam would be added to the list of nations eligible for emergency U.S. help in fighting the epidemic. "We're putting a history of bitterness behind us with Vietnam," Bush said, speaking at the Greater Exodus Baptist Church, a largely African-American congregation with faith-based social programs. Bush said he is poised to send $500 million more to prevent and treat the disease in Vietnam and 14 other countries in Africa and the Caribbean.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2003
A year after Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley declared a state of emergency in the battle against AIDS, health officials say they're worried that a drop in AIDS cases could lead to public complacency. "While AIDS is becoming more and more a chronic disease and less of a fatal disease, we want to avoid media fatigue from setting in and an attitude where people feel they can ignore what's still a very serious threat," said Dr. Peter L. Beilenson, city health commissioner. The number of city residents dying of AIDS has dropped steadily over the past decade, from 959 in 1993 to 93 last year, he said.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 16, 2003
Six AIDS activists briefly disrupted a speech by federal Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy G. Thompson yesterday in Baltimore. As Thompson addressed a conference on illness prevention, the protesters burst into a tent in front of the Marriott Waterfront hotel where about 1,000 health officials and advocates were eating lunch. They held up posters and chanted, "AIDS is an emergency, save the Global Fund," before being led out by security guards. One of the protesters, Allison Dinsmore of Philadelphia, said later that they believe the $15 billion President Bush has pledged to the international fight against AIDS should go to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, a multinational group.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 23, 2000
WASHINGTON - President Clinton and his South African counterpart, Thabo Mbeki, danced delicately around the issue of AIDS yesterday, agreeing to disagree on the disease's cause while moving forward on infrastructure and poverty issues that could combat AIDS indirectly. The controversy surrounding Mbeki's questions on the cause and treatment of AIDS threatened to overwhelm the South African president's first state visit to Washington since he succeeded Nelson Mandela as president last year.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2004
Comptroller William Donald Schaefer clarified his support of a registry of people with HIV/AIDS yesterday, saying he wants a public list of only those who intentionally spread the disease to others. Under fire for stating that AIDS victims were to blame for their disease and were a danger to society in comments two weeks ago, Schaefer, speaking on the Chip Franklin Show on WBAL radio, said he is only trying to stop the spread of HIV. "To me, a woman on the street, a prostitute that intentionally gives a person AIDS, she should be on the registry," he said.
NEWS
By Michael A. Lev and Michael A. Lev,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 21, 2002
BEIJING - China released a prominent AIDS activist from detention yesterday after he acknowledged leaking state secrets, apparently ending a case that drew widespread international criticism of the government. The activist, Wan Yanhai, disappeared Aug. 25. It was later learned he had been placed under investigation by state security for disseminating a government AIDS report over the Internet. China's official Xinhua News Agency said Wan had been detained on suspicion of illegally leaking state secrets and had been released after "confessing his crime."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 29, 2002
BEIJING - China's most prominent AIDS activist has disappeared, apparently detained by government security services, human rights groups and relatives said. The activist, Wan Yanhai, is a former Chinese health official who was fired after he took up the causes of gay rights and AIDS in the mid-1990s. He has been involved in various small but influential projects in the past few years, including a Web site about HIV and the creation of small support groups. He has also helped expose a devastating AIDS epidemic in central China, whose epicenter is in Henan province, where as many as 1 million people may have been infected through sales of tainted blood.
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