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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | May 23, 1999
Imagine a historic Ruxton stone mansion, surrounded by 25 acres of rolling lawns, gardens, woods, ponds and fountains. Now imagine a perfect spring afternoon. Two gleaming white tents are pitched amid the greenery, and some 600 guests stroll the grounds, sipping drinks and dining on a seemingly endless supply of shrimp. That was the scene at the tony Tea at Tyrconnell, which raised $70,000 for AIDS Action Baltimore.Spotted among the swanky set: Lynda Dee, executive director of AIDS Action Baltimore; event chair Joe Platerote; event committee members Lisa Blair, Barbara E. Stern, Karen Winicki, Amy Lowenstein and Greg Baranoski; Corbin, owner of Corbin Salon; Lisa Barnhill, associate broker at Hill & Co.; David Naumann and Dave Shatt, owners of the Bay Cafe; and Michael J. Brown, publisher at Daedalus Books.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
Paul Wilson Ramey, a member of the Army Corps of Engineers who was a founder of AIDS Action Baltimore, died of cancer Dec. 29 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 55 and lived in Hampden. Born and raised in Woodstock, Va., he was a 1975 graduate of Central High School who earned a civil engineering degree "with distinction" at Virginia Military Institute. He then served as a first lieutenant in the Army Reserves' transportation corps. After work at the Wilson T. Ballard engineering firm in Owings Mills, he practiced civil engineering at Whitman, Requardt and Associates from 1983 to 1991.
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FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | February 26, 1992
Proceeds from today's five shows of "Beauty and the Beast" at the Senator Theatre will be donated to AIDS Action Baltimore in memory of Howard Ashman, its executive producer and lyricist."
NEWS
June 11, 2008
On June 2, 2008, GARY MICHAEL RICKTOR, loving partner of Stephen Chisholm. Memorial Services will be held at St. Peter Claver Church, 1546 Fremont Avenue, Baltimore, 21217 on Saturday, June 28, 2008 at 1:00 P.M. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to AIDS Action.
NEWS
June 11, 2008
On June 2, 2008, GARY MICHAEL RICKTOR, loving partner of Stephen Chisholm. Memorial Services will be held at St. Peter Claver Church, 1546 Fremont Avenue, Baltimore, 21217 on Saturday, June 28, 2008 at 1:00 P.M. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to AIDS Action.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | September 8, 1995
Paul A. Risi, a Charles Village hairstylist whose annual Christmas tree was a tradition in his Bolton Hill neighborhood, died Aug. 29 of AIDS at his home. He was 41.Mr. Risi worked at Current Rage Hair Studio, where he had begun his career 13 years ago. Earlier, he had been a waiter."He was very popular with our clients and had wonderful expertise as a cutter," said Rose Nathewitch, Current Rage proprietor. "He kept his customers for years, and that was because he did exactly what they asked and he always smiled."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | August 13, 2000
You think John Waters' movies are a little excessive? Why should the party for the world premiere of the Baltimore filmmaker's new movie, "Cecil B. DeMented," be anything less? The 800 guests who partied at the Lava Lounge for this AIDS Action Baltimore fund raiser weren't disappointed. First, there was the intoxicating beat of disco and hip-hop music resounding through the club. Then, the scrumptious food donated by more than 20 local restaurants and caterers. Some of Waters' favorite videos (too "interesting" to mention here)
ENTERTAINMENT
By SLOANE BROWN | May 21, 2000
The grounds of Ruxton's historic Tyrconnell Mansion were in the pink for the fourth-annual "Tea at Tyrconnell." Huge hot pink and orange sculptures dotted the patio, while fuchsia streamers fluttered in the breeze under two tents. And by early evening, many of the 700 guests had a pink glow, courtesy of the sun, cha-cha-cha rum punch or a combination of the two. Or maybe it was the knowledge that the Sunday soiree had raised more than $70,000 for AIDS Action Baltimore. Basking among the beautiful people: Joe Platerote, event chair; Amy Lowenstein, Jayme Gilden, Barbara Stern, Stephen Tancibok, Karen and Paul Winicki, event committee members; Lynda Dee, board president of AIDS Action Baltimore; Ken Eggrel, Joe Myers and Tom Holden, board members; Eileen Hotz, WBFF-TV news assistant; Stuart Ortel, Stone Hill Designs owner; Mike Aquino, Strategic Resource Group; Charlie Reid, partner of Brown Investment Advisory; Gino Cardinale, owner of City Caf; Enid Feinberg, partner with State of the Art Design; Patrick Onley, free-lance TV writer and producer; Heshi Zinman, HIV manager with DuPont Pharmaceuticals; Purvey Bennett, AT&T data circuit designer; Curt Decker, D.C. disability lobbyist; and Ken Davies, partner with Wright, Constable & Skeen.
NEWS
June 25, 1992
William J. Urban, founder, publisher and editor of theBaltimore Alternative, a gay newspaper, died yesterday of complications to AIDS. He was 37.Mr. Urban had battled AIDS for almost six years. In the years since his diagnosis, he chronicled his experiences with the illness in articles appearing in community publications on the Eastern Shore, where he was raised, as well as in his own newspaper.He was born in Lancaster, Pa. He graduated from Kent High School in Worton in 1973 and attended several colleges and universities, including the University of California at Santa Barbara and, in Baltimore, Loyola College and Coppin State College.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | June 28, 1994
The image of AIDS activists is one of angry, in-your-face street protesters shouting from the perimeter of the scientific establishment for immediate action -- and using nearly any means to get it.But as the epidemic grinds on, shifts in method and attitude are taking place among members of the advocacy movement for victims of acquired immune deficiency syndrome.Now, many longtime activists sit beside members of the medical and scientific establishment on panels and committees. And, in sharp contrast to their urgent demands of the 1980s, they often preach caution.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun reporter | March 28, 2008
Six years after city officials declared a "state of emergency" over Baltimore's AIDS problem, a commission is calling for stronger prevention efforts to reverse an epidemic that remains one of the nation's worst. In a report released yesterday, the advisory panel said Baltimore is beset by rising infection rates among adults in their 20s. Meanwhile, African-Americans continue to bear the brunt of the disease, accounting for 90 percent of new HIV and AIDS cases. "Baltimore as a whole is not doing well," said Dr. William Blattner, an epidemiologist who heads the Baltimore City Commission on HIV/AIDS Prevention and Treatment.
NEWS
August 7, 2005
Brian Ott, 13, a pupil at Patuxent Valley Middle School, has organized a charity basketball game to benefit AIDS Action, a Washington-based organization that educates and is an advocate for people affected by HIV/AIDS. The game will be played on the outdoor basketball court at Patuxent Valley Middle School at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Brian and 12 friends have solicited sponsorships for the points they score, as well as for each assist, steal, block and rebound. The money raised will be matched by Brian's uncle, Ian Sudano, who works closely with the Desert AIDS Project in Palm Springs, Calif.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to the Sun | September 28, 2003
A certain uninvited guest by the name of Isabel crashed several fund-raisers last weekend. But leave it to us Mur-landers not to let anyone or anything ruin a good party. "Do the ideas of chainsaws and decorating go well together?' asks Historic Ellicott City executive director Janet Kusterer. Chainsaws were what was used to cut away trees Isabel kicked onto the road leading up to the group's 19th Decorator Show House, Valhalla in Marriottsville. The original kickoff preview party was postponed from Thursday, Sept.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2002
Faced with a doubling of county AIDS cases in the past three years, Carroll health officials have launched a campaign to encourage testing and early treatment, to educate young people and to make the population more aware of the potentially fatal illness. "We have to get the prevention message out, not only to youth but to their parents," said Bernice Culver, a registered nurse and acquired immune deficiency syndrome case manager for Carroll County Health Department. "Death rates are down, but infection rates are up. People have become relaxed in their attitudes to this disease.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | August 13, 2000
You think John Waters' movies are a little excessive? Why should the party for the world premiere of the Baltimore filmmaker's new movie, "Cecil B. DeMented," be anything less? The 800 guests who partied at the Lava Lounge for this AIDS Action Baltimore fund raiser weren't disappointed. First, there was the intoxicating beat of disco and hip-hop music resounding through the club. Then, the scrumptious food donated by more than 20 local restaurants and caterers. Some of Waters' favorite videos (too "interesting" to mention here)
ENTERTAINMENT
By SLOANE BROWN | May 21, 2000
The grounds of Ruxton's historic Tyrconnell Mansion were in the pink for the fourth-annual "Tea at Tyrconnell." Huge hot pink and orange sculptures dotted the patio, while fuchsia streamers fluttered in the breeze under two tents. And by early evening, many of the 700 guests had a pink glow, courtesy of the sun, cha-cha-cha rum punch or a combination of the two. Or maybe it was the knowledge that the Sunday soiree had raised more than $70,000 for AIDS Action Baltimore. Basking among the beautiful people: Joe Platerote, event chair; Amy Lowenstein, Jayme Gilden, Barbara Stern, Stephen Tancibok, Karen and Paul Winicki, event committee members; Lynda Dee, board president of AIDS Action Baltimore; Ken Eggrel, Joe Myers and Tom Holden, board members; Eileen Hotz, WBFF-TV news assistant; Stuart Ortel, Stone Hill Designs owner; Mike Aquino, Strategic Resource Group; Charlie Reid, partner of Brown Investment Advisory; Gino Cardinale, owner of City Caf; Enid Feinberg, partner with State of the Art Design; Patrick Onley, free-lance TV writer and producer; Heshi Zinman, HIV manager with DuPont Pharmaceuticals; Purvey Bennett, AT&T data circuit designer; Curt Decker, D.C. disability lobbyist; and Ken Davies, partner with Wright, Constable & Skeen.
FEATURES
By Sue Campbell | November 25, 1990
If you happen to have spare clothing, appliances, furniture, office equipment or those two most precious commodities -- time and money -- an awful lot of people in Baltimore and surrounding areas would be delighted to hear from you. In this, the traditional season of Thanksgiving and giving, you can help those in need. Attend dances, festivals and feasts that raise money for charities. Purchase charity raffle tickets. Or instead of buying something for a person who already has everything, make a charitable donation in her name.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2002
Faced with a doubling of county AIDS cases in the past three years, Carroll health officials have launched a campaign to encourage testing and early treatment, to educate young people and to make the population more aware of the potentially fatal illness. "We have to get the prevention message out, not only to youth but to their parents," said Bernice Culver, a registered nurse and acquired immune deficiency syndrome case manager for Carroll County Health Department. "Death rates are down, but infection rates are up. People have become relaxed in their attitudes to this disease.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | August 29, 1999
Scientific advances, increased federal money for research, and Third World countries finally waking up to the fact that AIDS has ravaged their populations is creating optimism for a milestone that could save millions: a vaccine for the deadly AIDS virus.Just two years ago, when President Clinton pledged to Morgan State University graduates that scientists would find a vaccine for AIDS within a decade, there was plenty of cynicism. Today, there is much less."It is possible that the components for a reasonably successful vaccine are almost there, in our hands, but we don't know it yet," said Dr. Robert C. Gallo, co-discoverer of the AIDS virus.
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