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By New York Times News Service | October 18, 1993
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- In an apparent gesture of good will, forces loyal to Gen. Mohamed Farah Aidid have dismantled most of the dozen roadblocks they had erected along a main thoroughfare in the capital, U.S. military officers said yesterday.U.S. Army helicopter crews have detected a significant decrease in barricades along 21 October Road, their commander said. A flight along the street yesterday afternoon showed that only two or three barricades now block the way of traffic.The change is important because the roadblocks built by General Aidid's forces had essentially prevented U.N. forces from moving along the east-west road.
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NEWS
December 18, 1996
U.S. MARINES went ashore in Somalia in 1992 to set up Operation Restore Hope, with a secret asset -- reservist Sgt. Hussein Aidid of Los Angeles, 30, who had lived in the U.S. since age 14, as interpreter and guide. That he was the third son of Gen. Mohamed Farah Aidid, militia chief of the Habr-Gedir sub-clan of the Hawiye clan and boss of south Mogadishu, did not hurt.After the United Nations declared General Aidid the problem and ordered his arrest, Sergeant Aidid was packed home. The U.S. went after the warlord, who killed Americans, humiliated the superpower and turned American public opinion against the operation, mission creep and ever sending American troops on ill-defined missions without exit route or date.
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NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | August 29, 1993
At first glance, dispatching 400 Army Rangers to Somalia does not make a lot of sense.Rangers are an elite commando force. These are the guys who slide down ropes from helicopters and train in counterterrorism and unconventional warfare.These were the dreaded "lurps" -- Long-Range Reconnaissance Patrols -- of Vietnam, who smeared their faces and hands with camouflage paint, crept into the jungle at night and killed in utter silence.So what are they doing in Somalia where our mission is to feed people?
NEWS
August 5, 1996
PEACE MAY RESULT from the slaying of Somalia's faction chief Mohamed Farah Aidid. But it is not assured, though the tTC population is frightened, hungry, sick of chaos and ready for an end to civil war.General Aidid was the principal barrier to any accord. He ruled south Mogadishu and battled with the chief of north Mogadishu, Ali Mahdi Mohamed, as well as with defectors and other clan leaders. He declared himself president. He prevented any coalition from working.Some ragtag enemy's bullet did what the U.S. Army, Marines, Navy, Air Force, CIA and NSA could not do. It found Aidid.
NEWS
August 5, 1996
PEACE MAY RESULT from the slaying of Somalia's faction chief Mohamed Farah Aidid. But it is not assured, though the tTC population is frightened, hungry, sick of chaos and ready for an end to civil war.General Aidid was the principal barrier to any accord. He ruled south Mogadishu and battled with the chief of north Mogadishu, Ali Mahdi Mohamed, as well as with defectors and other clan leaders. He declared himself president. He prevented any coalition from working.Some ragtag enemy's bullet did what the U.S. Army, Marines, Navy, Air Force, CIA and NSA could not do. It found Aidid.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | October 22, 1993
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- Mogadishu's other warlord, enraged that America has abandoned the fight against his archenemy, is warning of renewed clan warfare in Somalia after U.S. troops leave."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 18, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Despite the administration's attempts to blame the United Nations for the Somalia crisis, the intensifying military operations there were repeatedly endorsed and sometimes driven by top U.S. officials in the months before the disastrous Army raid on a hostile faction two weeks ago.Last Thursday, 11 days after 18 U.S. soldiers died in the raid, President Clinton sought to shift responsibility to the United Nations, which took over the Somalian...
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | September 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Pancho Villa taught the U.S. Army 77 years ago that snaring warlords can be tricky business, and when Congress gets back next week, the Clinton administration may find that the idea of arresting Mohamed Farah Aidid is viewed dubiously, as well.It was with an anxious eye on Congress that the administration last month sent a task force of 400 Rangers to Somalia, ostensibly to augment a U.S.-commanded "quick reaction force" charged with providing security for United Nations operations.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau | October 15, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton, insisting yesterday that "there was no deal" with Somalian Gen. Mohamed Farah Aidid for the return of a wounded U.S. helicopter pilot, nevertheless left open the possibility that the fugitive warlord can play a leadership role in Somalia.In a wide-ranging news conference devoted solely to foreign policy issues, the president also said he has no intention of backing down in his quest to restore exiled Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide to power.In fact, Mr. Clinton hinted broadly that he is considering a blockade to enforce a U.N. embargo aimed at the island's military dictatorship.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times The New York Times contributed to this article | October 10, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Somalian warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid proposed an immediate cease-fire in his urban guerrilla war with United Nations forces yesterday, and President Clinton quickly welcomed the truce offer.In a statement broadcast on his guerrilla faction's radio station in the Somalian capital of Mogadishu, General Aidid said he wants "a total cease-fire" that would apply to his forces, U.N. forces and the growing U.S. military contingent.The Somalian clan leader also said he accepts Mr. Clinton's proposals for settling the conflict and is ready to resume peace talks with other Somalian factions, according to news agencies that monitored the broadcast.
NEWS
January 3, 1995
Mohamed Siad BarreExiled Somali leaderMaj. Gen. Mohamed Siad Barre, who was overthrown as president of Somalia in 1991 after ruling that impoverished African country for more than 20 years, died on Monday in exile in Lagos, Nigeria."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 24, 1993
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- United Nations officials are concerned at signs of disputes between the rival Somalian factions that share control of the capital and fear that a clash may be increasingly likely.Renewed tensions between the forces of Gen. Mohamed Farah Aidid and Ali Mahdi Mohamed are a growing threat to peace efforts being pressed by the United States and the United Nations, the officials say.U.N. representatives have urged each faction to avoid steps that might provoke the other to violence.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 23, 1993
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- In a bold and risky rebuke to both the Clinton administration and Somalian warlord Mohamed Farah Aidid, United Nations Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali defied even his own staff's security warnings yesterday to visit the once-starving town of Baidoa and the Somalian capital, where angry demonstrators burned tires and waved cow skulls to protest the visit.But the secretary-general never saw the protests.In fact, Mr. Boutros-Ghali never left the heavily fortified Mogadishu airport during his secretive two-hour stop in the capital, where not even the news media knew of his presence until after he departed for Nairobi, Kenya.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | October 22, 1993
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- Mogadishu's other warlord, enraged that America has abandoned the fight against his archenemy, is warning of renewed clan warfare in Somalia after U.S. troops leave."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 21, 1993
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- Stripped to their shorts, their faces smeared with sun block, the crack commandos of the U.S. Army's 75th Ranger Regiment spent the last day of their ill-fated mission in Somalia locked in fierce combat -- on the volleyball court.Then, before the sweat dried, the first 100 quietly packed their bags, had a last look around and prepared to board a C-5 Galaxy for home today in a departure with no ceremony.Asked yesterday how long he had been in Somalia, one of the 750 Rangers due to leave under President Clinton's orders to abandon their mission simply shook his head and said, "Too long."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 18, 1993
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- In an apparent gesture of good will, forces loyal to Gen. Mohamed Farah Aidid have dismantled most of the dozen roadblocks they had erected along a main thoroughfare in the capital, U.S. military officers said yesterday.U.S. Army helicopter crews have detected a significant decrease in barricades along 21 October Road, their commander said. A flight along the street yesterday afternoon showed that only two or three barricades now block the way of traffic.The change is important because the roadblocks built by General Aidid's forces had essentially prevented U.N. forces from moving along the east-west road.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | October 11, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Secretary of State Warren M. Christopher admitted yesterday that the administration "right up to and including the president" had failed to assess the dangers posed by its drive to capture Somalian warlord Mohamed Farah Aidid.The acknowledgment came as the Clinton administration remained on the defensive, trying to explain its policy toward Somalia as congressional and public sentiment turns against a continued U.S. presence in the African nation.Mr. Christopher, in a television interview, said the United States went along with a shift in the United Nations' mission in Somalia in June "perhaps without a full understanding of the consequences of that."
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | September 30, 1993
Either catch Mohamed Farah Aidid, or make a movie about him!Mrs. Clinton ought to go to the Hill any time Bill needs a job done there.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 18, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Despite the administration's attempts to blame the United Nations for the Somalia crisis, the intensifying military operations there were repeatedly endorsed and sometimes driven by top U.S. officials in the months before the disastrous Army raid on a hostile faction two weeks ago.Last Thursday, 11 days after 18 U.S. soldiers died in the raid, President Clinton sought to shift responsibility to the United Nations, which took over the Somalian...
NEWS
By RICHARD O'MARA | October 17, 1993
Recent events in Somalia and Haiti suggest the unhappy conclusion that U.S. troops are becoming unsuitable for further high-profile United Nations peacekeeping operations.It is not because they are incompetent, ill-equipped, untrained or psychologically unfit for this kind of work.Rather, it is because they are becoming the targets of those who desire to frustrate U.N. initiatives.That was never more evident than last Monday in Port-au-Prince when those trying to prevent the United Nations from restoring Haiti's elected President Jean-Bertrand Aristide urged the Haitian military to fight the Americans in the peacekeeping force preparing to land from the ship Harlan County anchored offshore.
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