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Aid To Russia

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NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,Staff Writer | April 2, 1992
NEW YORK -- Gov. Bill Clinton claimed credit yesterday for prodding President Bush into finally proposing plans for assisting the former Soviet republics, and offered his support "in convincing the American people and the Congress that this is the necessary course for our country."In a speech before the Foreign Policy Association, the Arkansas governor said he hoped Mr. Bush's statement "represents not only a declaration of intent, but a commitment to lead on this issue" in the post-Cold War era, just as the United States assumed the role of international leadership after World War II.The front-runner for the Democratic presidential nomination accused the man he would run against of having been "overly cautious on the issue of aid to Russia, not for policy considerations but for political calculations."
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NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 17, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Responding to criticism of U.S. policy toward Russia, Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright urged continued aid for Moscow yesterday as the best defense against nuclear proliferation but warned Russia to crack down on corruption."
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 14, 1993
TOKYO -- President Clinton has told Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa that U.S. contributions to Russia would increase by at least $2 billion, Japanese and U.S. officials here said today. The figure would more than double the original $1.6 billion Mr. Clinton had pledged to Russia originally.In the conversation, which took place yesterday on the eve of a conference in Tokyo on Russian aid, Mr. Miyazawa reportedly said that Japan had decided to offer $1.8 billion in direct bilateral financial assistance to support Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's programs for democratic change.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 20, 1997
NEW YORK -- George Soros, the Hungarian-born American financier and philanthropist, said yesterday that he would spend as much as $500 million in the next three years in Russia trying to improve health care, expand educational opportunities and help retrain the military for civilian jobs.In a telephone interview from Moscow, Soros said he would announce the initiative in eight fields today. This latest gift would make him Russia's largest philanthropist and largest individual Western investor, as well as a donor whose presence rivals that of the United States, which gave Russia $95 million in foreign aid last year.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | April 2, 1993
WASHINGTON--President Clinton's decision to press for financial aid for Russia is a test for both him and for the voters who put him into the White House.In one sense, Clinton already has passed that test by saying, in effect, that he is willing to risk some of his political capital on the kind of proposal that is certain to evoke bitter criticism from some elements of the electorate. The key question now is whether Americans will accept his plea--outlined in detail before the American Society of Newspaper Editors--that they look beyond "the dilemmas of the moment" and see the "larger questions" involved in helping Boris Yeltsin.
FEATURES
By New York Daily News | May 28, 1992
Ross Perot and his wife, Margot, sat for Barbara Walters at their home in Dallas for tonight's "20/20."ABC says Mr. Perot discussed his views of the presidency, the issues and values he believes in most and his positions on the deficit, taxes, abortion, aid to Russia, homosexuality in the military, welfare and how he would change the role of the vice president and the State Department.
NEWS
June 21, 1991
Callers to SUNDIAL may not know quite what to make of Boris Yeltsin, president of the major Soviet republic of Russia. On one hand, a slight majority registered the opinion that President Bush should negotiate directly with Yeltsin. On the other hand, a slight majority supported the idea that Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev would be a better leader than Yeltsin.On specific questions, 123 of 229 callers (53 percent) said Bush should negotiate with Yeltsin, and 106 said the president shouldn't.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 17, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Responding to criticism of U.S. policy toward Russia, Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright urged continued aid for Moscow yesterday as the best defense against nuclear proliferation but warned Russia to crack down on corruption."
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | April 14, 1993
TOKYO -- Japan's Cabinet approved a record $116.8-billion in economic pump-priming last night -- a move designed as much to shape relations with the United States as it is to generate a surge in the Japanese economy.At the same time, the government appeared ready to make another uncomfortable gesture to the West -- and especially the United States -- by allocating about $1.8 billion in aid to Russia despite a territorial dispute with Moscow over the Kuril Islands in the North Pacific.The $116.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | February 25, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The rush of some Republican senators to see a return of the Cold War in the arrest of a high CIA officer charged with spying for Moscow indicates again their belief that foreign policy is President Clinton's Achilles' heel and, if they rub it the right way, it can defeat him in the 1996 election.But while Clinton has characterized the case as "very serious" and the FBI is said to claim that a number of informers in the old Soviet Union lost their lives as a result, the fact that spying went on, and still does, is hardly a revelation.
NEWS
By James L. Hecht | August 6, 1996
WILMINGTON, Del. -- In 1992, the United States promised Russia to help with the difficult task of economic reform. There was talk of assistance involving tens of billions of dollars, but in the end only $4 billion was given.Still, had that money been spent wisely, economic reform would have alleviated life for Russians, half of whom are worse off economically now than under communism. Instead, however, most of this money was used to provide corporate welfare to politically connected American companies.
NEWS
By DAVID J. KRAMER | April 9, 1995
During the Clinton administration's first two years in office, the White House touted Russia as one of its major foreign policy successes. One no longer hears such talk. The administration's earlier hype, in fact, has come back to haunt it as relations with Moscow have deteriorated. By exaggerating U.S. influence over developments in Russia and by painting too positive a picture of Russian domestic and foreign policy, the administration set itself up for a big fall.The latest setback came this week when Russia rejected pleas from Defense Secretary William J. Perry to cancel a proposed $800 million sale of nuclear reactors to Iran.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 14, 1994
WASHINGTON -- After veering from being enemies to being friends, the United States and Russia have settled uncomfortably in between.And the political weakness of Presidents Bill Clinton and Boris N. Yeltsin threatens to make the relationship worse.Four years after the collapse of the Soviet Union all but buried the threat of mutual nuclear incineration, the two countries are chafing over such post-Cold War problems as Bosnia, Iraq and the expansion of NATO. And with Russia still struggling to create durable democratic institutions, the former rival states face new strains as a result of Republican pressure in Congress to cut U.S. aid to Russia.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 14, 1994
WASHINGTON -- After veering from being enemies to being friends, the United States and Russia have settled uncomfortably in between.And the political weakness of Presidents Bill Clinton and Boris N. Yeltsin threatens to make the relationship worse.Four years after the collapse of the Soviet Union all but buried the threat of mutual nuclear incineration, the two countries are chafing over such post-Cold War problems as Bosnia, Iraq and the expansion of NATO. And with Russia still struggling to create durable democratic institutions, the former rival states face new strains as a result of Republican pressure in Congress to cut U.S. aid to Russia.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | March 16, 1994
EVERY other word in Washington these days, at least about foreign policy, seems to revolve around Russian aid. We did not want to cut off aid over the Ames spy case, for instance, because it would benefit the most reactionary forces in the Russian government.Then, this week, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee released its report on the $3 billion assistance program, and it was qualifiedly critical. "It does not appear," the report said, "that the average citizen of Moscow, Almaty or Bishkek . . . is aware of or affected by international assistance or the reforms that it is supposed to foster."
NEWS
March 1, 1994
Honor codesOne has to live in a fantasy world to believe that unsupervised examinations and sloppy handling of papers so that the students get ready access to them could lead to a fair and just evaluation.The so-called honor code practiced by the Naval Academy and many graduate divisions of universities creates an illusion that it is adhered to by all the students.In actual practice, students who honor the code find themselves at a disadvantage.It is always better to prevent cheating by proper supervision than to punish those who succumb to temptations.
NEWS
By DAVID J. KRAMER | April 9, 1995
During the Clinton administration's first two years in office, the White House touted Russia as one of its major foreign policy successes. One no longer hears such talk. The administration's earlier hype, in fact, has come back to haunt it as relations with Moscow have deteriorated. By exaggerating U.S. influence over developments in Russia and by painting too positive a picture of Russian domestic and foreign policy, the administration set itself up for a big fall.The latest setback came this week when Russia rejected pleas from Defense Secretary William J. Perry to cancel a proposed $800 million sale of nuclear reactors to Iran.
NEWS
By Elaine Sciolino and Elaine Sciolino,New York Times News Service | February 8, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration intends to create a supercommittee in the State Department to shape a unified strategy toward Russia and the other former Soviet republics, but it has no intention of immediately increasing foreign aid to the area, senior administration officials say.In an effort to avoid what it considers President George Bush's haphazard approach to the problem, the administration has chosen Strobe Talbott, a journalist and author...
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | February 25, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The rush of some Republican senators to see a return of the Cold War in the arrest of a high CIA officer charged with spying for Moscow indicates again their belief that foreign policy is President Clinton's Achilles' heel and, if they rub it the right way, it can defeat him in the 1996 election.But while Clinton has characterized the case as "very serious" and the FBI is said to claim that a number of informers in the old Soviet Union lost their lives as a result, the fact that spying went on, and still does, is hardly a revelation.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Carl M. Cannon and Mark Matthews and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 24, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Bit by painful bit, it's becoming clearer that while the United States and Russia are not the enemies they used to be, they are far from being the best of friends.The arrest of a CIA official on charges of selling sensitive secrets to the Russians is part of a recent pattern of events that brings post-Cold War Russia into clearer focus.Amid economic chaos and a painful transition to democracy, Russia views itself as a great power with interests that at times clash with the United States'.
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