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NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Evening Sun Staff Thomas W. Waldron and Larry Carson contributed to this nTC story | October 8, 1991
Scores of angry protesters converged on the State House today to wave signs and voice their outrage at severe budget cuts proposed by the governor.Meanwhile, Senate and House leaders are nearing an agreement to stave off about one-fifth of those cuts -- such as to state police, welfare recipients and drug treatment programs -- without raising taxes.To do so, lawmakers are considering additional cuts in state aid to local governments and schools, as well as furloughs and early retirements for state government workers, Del. Charles J. Ryan, chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, said today.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Laura Smitherman and Liz Bowie and Laura Smitherman,bowie@baltsun.com and laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | January 23, 2009
State funding for local schools would plunge by $69 million next year under Gov. Martin O'Malley's plan to eliminate a nearly $2 billion shortfall in Maryland's budget, a change that would hit poorest districts hardest. Under the 2010 budget proposal introduced this week, Baltimore would receive $23 million less than in the current school year and Prince George's would be cut by $35 million. Baltimore County would lose $8 million. The belt-tightening comes after years of robust growth in education spending under the landmark 2002 education funding plan known as the Thornton formula.
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NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | December 24, 1991
When Maryland lawmakers arrive in Annapolis Jan. 8 to begin the 1992 General Assembly session, they'll be greeted by hordes of angry critics who don't like the way the state has dealt with its fiscal crisis.Organizations from around the state are planning to descend upon the State House and voice their concerns about the effect of budget cuts on government services.Over a two-week period in January alone, no fewer than four rallies have been scheduled to protest cuts Gov. William Donald Schaefer and the legislature have made or plan to make to balance the budget.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | July 11, 2007
Despite Gov. Martin O'Malley's pledge to spare local governments, legislative leaders say cuts in aid to counties and cities will likely have to be part of the state's effort to resolve its $1.5 billion budget shortfall. The governor, a former mayor, managed to avoid such cuts in the $213 million worth of proposed spending reductions he publicly unveiled yesterday, and he reiterated his desire to preserve the money the state passes on to local governments for education, public safety and other services.
NEWS
October 17, 1992
This is how far Maryland has come in its budget crisis, in case you've lost track:Last month, the governor huddled with legislative leaders and announced that he would cut $150 million in aid to local governments. The locals squawked, and demanded to be brought into the process.This week, the governor huddled with legislative leaders and announced he would cut $147 million in aid to local governments, by making the locals pick up the state's contributions to the teacher pension fund. The locals squawked, and demanded to be brought into the process.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Evening Sun Staff | January 2, 1991
At the request of Gov. William Donald Schaefer, the state Board of Public Works today trimmed more than $50 million from the state budget, reducing aid to local governments and eliminating the jobs of 45 government workers.Thirty-six meat and poultry inspectors and nine computer workers will be out of a job, while several vacant positions will be eliminated. The federal government is expected to pick up the meat and poultry inspection program, however.The Board of Public Works, which includes the governor, comptroller and treasurer, approved the cuts as part of Schaefer's plan to reduce the projected budget deficit.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff writer | February 27, 1991
Carroll legislators on General Assembly budget committees say they remain committed to cutting costs in next year's budget, rather than raising taxes, even if it means reducing aid to deficit-ridden local governments.The latest proposal from Gov. William Donald Schaefer to legislators calls for reducing education aid to counties by $45 million and the property tax grant the state returns to local jurisdictions by $26 million to compensate for a projected $115 million revenue shortfall in fiscal 1992.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Liz Bowie contributed to this article | April 10, 1998
The General Assembly gave final approval yesterday to legislation that would increase state aid to local school systems by $68 million a year, with much of the money targeted to students in poverty.The vote by the House of Delegates ends an often contentious struggle that began last year when legislators from the Washington suburbs objected to the General Assembly's passage of a major education spending increase for Baltimore.This year, in a politically balanced approach, all areas of the state receive new aid.The largest sum -- $18 million -- would go to Prince George's County, where student test scores rank second worst in the state, trailing Baltimore's.
NEWS
March 28, 1995
For state leaders to cut personal income taxes this year would have required them to suspend reality and ignore the sad fiscal facts confronting the state of Maryland.Legislative firebrands -- especially radical/conservative Republicans -- wanted to -- into the unknown. But key fiscal leaders and the governor finally prevailed last week in winning a sensible delay until next year.Maryland is not yet in a position to cut back on personal taxation. There is still a big structural deficit that refuses to shrink.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns | October 11, 1991
Tony Demma was looking for help as he wandered into a group of protesting state employees at the Preston Street office buildings in Baltimore yesterday."
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | June 23, 2005
As Maryland health officials pledged yesterday to help local agencies find ways of providing health coverage to uninsured legal immigrants despite state funding cuts, health care advocates warned that the costs will be shifted to hospitals and county and city governments. Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s budget plans to eliminate a $7 million Medicaid program for low-income pregnant women and children who are legal permanent residents, about 4,000 people statewide. The administration is sending letters informing people they will lose their benefits starting July 1, the beginning of the fiscal year.
NEWS
January 5, 2003
Maryland needs more revenue to support schools In this tight budget climate, at least one thing is still guaranteed: Maryland's 1 million school-age children are still guaranteed an adequate education by the Maryland Constitution. Gov. Parris N. Glendening appointed the Thornton Commission to determine the new money needed to meet the education needs of every child and finally fulfill Maryland's constitutional commitment. But the commission's recommendations for increased state aid assumed stable levels of local education spending.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Liz Bowie contributed to this article | April 10, 1998
The General Assembly gave final approval yesterday to legislation that would increase state aid to local school systems by $68 million a year, with much of the money targeted to students in poverty.The vote by the House of Delegates ends an often contentious struggle that began last year when legislators from the Washington suburbs objected to the General Assembly's passage of a major education spending increase for Baltimore.This year, in a politically balanced approach, all areas of the state receive new aid.The largest sum -- $18 million -- would go to Prince George's County, where student test scores rank second worst in the state, trailing Baltimore's.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1997
Local school systems would receive about $50 million in state aid geared to teaching students from poor families under a plan to be outlined today by Maryland school Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick, according to people familiar with her proposal.The spending increase has the support of leaders in the House of Delegates, who hope they can build consensus around the proposal and avoid a repeat of the bruising regional fight over education funding that divided the General Assembly earlier this year.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1996
Despite assurances to the contrary by Gov. Parris N. Glendening, some local officials are concerned that the governor's proposed 10 percent income tax cut will mean reduced state aid to the counties.Those officials say they are worried about the lack of detail on Glendening's plan and fear that the details could cost them money -- in the way that the recession of the early 1990s forced the state to slash millions in local aid to solve its budget crises."County officials want to be secure that the state, in implementing its tax cut, is not just building up a future debt that the counties will be called on to pay," said David S. Bliden, executive director of the Maryland Association of Counties (MACo)
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | April 30, 1995
The counties had better get used to it: ''Devolution'' is headed their way.From Washington to Annapolis to localities. That's how the downsizing of American government works. Washington takes welfare and Medicaid and hands them off to the states. The states, in turn, send along a big chunk of the programs to the cities and counties.It's already started. Welfare reform likely to pass Congress will return control of this program to the states. But the amount of federal money will no longer be unlimited.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and Marina Sarris and John W. Frece and Marina Sarris,Staff Writers | September 16, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Gov. William Donald Schaefer and legislative leaders tentatively agreed yesterday that at least $150 million of the state's half-billion-dollar budget deficit will have to be squeezed from local governments.During a series of closed briefings with lawmakers, Mr. Schaefer also said he will probably propose a new state lottery game designed to raise $50 million to help offset the deficit.The rest of the money -- about $300 million -- would come from broad reductions in spending by all state agencies, Mr. Schaefer told legislators.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1996
Despite assurances to the contrary by Gov. Parris N. Glendening, some local officials are concerned that the governor's proposed 10 percent income tax cut will mean reduced state aid to the counties.Those officials say they are worried about the lack of detail on Glendening's plan and fear that the details could cost them money -- in the way that the recession of the early 1990s forced the state to slash millions in local aid to solve its budget crises."County officials want to be secure that the state, in implementing its tax cut, is not just building up a future debt that the counties will be called on to pay," said David S. Bliden, executive director of the Maryland Association of Counties (MACo)
NEWS
March 28, 1995
For state leaders to cut personal income taxes this year would have required them to suspend reality and ignore the sad fiscal facts confronting the state of Maryland.Legislative firebrands -- especially radical/conservative Republicans -- wanted to -- into the unknown. But key fiscal leaders and the governor finally prevailed last week in winning a sensible delay until next year.Maryland is not yet in a position to cut back on personal taxation. There is still a big structural deficit that refuses to shrink.
NEWS
October 17, 1992
This is how far Maryland has come in its budget crisis, in case you've lost track:Last month, the governor huddled with legislative leaders and announced that he would cut $150 million in aid to local governments. The locals squawked, and demanded to be brought into the process.This week, the governor huddled with legislative leaders and announced he would cut $147 million in aid to local governments, by making the locals pick up the state's contributions to the teacher pension fund. The locals squawked, and demanded to be brought into the process.
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