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By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | May 29, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Election-year jitters on Capitol Hill appear to have doomed chances that President Bush will be able to present President Boris N. Yeltsin with a major aid package while the Russian president is here next month.The gloomy outlook diminishes expectations of both a Bush political glow from the June meeting and the United States' leadership role in trying to solidify free-market democracy in the former Soviet republics. It also comes as Russia's government confronts barriers to its ambitious economic reform plans, eliciting expert warnings of hyperinflation and worsening budget deficits.
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NEWS
June 6, 2007
To keep Legg Mason in Baltimore in the style it is accustomed to and accommodate an additional 200 to 300 of its employees, Mayor Sheila Dixon is willing to forgive about $33 million in taxes for the developer of a proposed waterside office tower complex that will house the money management firm. Without the assistance, city officials claim the project won't go forward. How's that for a little pressure? Let's be clear: There's only one reason to support this aid package, and that's to keep Legg Mason and its employees, who earn on average $111,000, in Baltimore, and that's an investment in the city's growth and future.
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NEWS
March 15, 1996
THE EMPATHETIC powers of President Clinton were in full view Thursday during his short visit to Israel after the Mideast terrorism summit. But empathy like symbolism is no mean quality, and seeing the president of the United States tenderly placing a pebble from the south lawn of the White House on the grave of Israel's assassinated Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin sent a strong message about the United States' stake in keeping alive the peace process between...
BUSINESS
By GAIL MARKSJARVIS and GAIL MARKSJARVIS,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | April 23, 2006
Who would have thought that one piece of mail could stir so much emotion? But that's what happens to families this time of year when the initial elation over fat college acceptance envelopes morphs into sticker shock. In May, students generally need to let colleges know if they will attend next fall, or pass up offers to favorite institutions and settle for more affordable options. For many parents, that poses sleepless nights as they face $20,000 or $40,000 annual costs to make their children's dreams come true.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 25, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The United States is preparing to commit U.S. taxpayer funds as part of a lending program of at least $30 billion to try to insulate Brazil, and with it the rest of Latin America, from the worst effects of the global financial turmoil, according to U.S. and foreign officials assembling the program.Details of the U.S. contribution, which is expected to total several billion dollars in direct aid or loan guarantees, have yet to be negotiated. But several congressional leaders have been alerted to the likelihood that the administration would have to act while Congress is in recess.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 13, 2001
WASHINGTON - The Bush administration has rejected Pakistan's request to release a fleet of F-16 jet fighters that it bought in the 1980s, U.S. officials said yesterday, adding that the United States wanted to avoid destabilizing relations in South Asia. In an interview Saturday, the president of Pakistan, Gen. Pervez Musharraf, said transferring the fighters would be an important symbolic gesture of U.S. gratitude for his nation's strong support in the war in Afghanistan. Pakistan purchased 28 F-16s in the 1980s, but their delivery was blocked when Congress cut off all aid and military sales in 1990, citing Pakistan's secret development of nuclear weapons.
NEWS
June 6, 2007
To keep Legg Mason in Baltimore in the style it is accustomed to and accommodate an additional 200 to 300 of its employees, Mayor Sheila Dixon is willing to forgive about $33 million in taxes for the developer of a proposed waterside office tower complex that will house the money management firm. Without the assistance, city officials claim the project won't go forward. How's that for a little pressure? Let's be clear: There's only one reason to support this aid package, and that's to keep Legg Mason and its employees, who earn on average $111,000, in Baltimore, and that's an investment in the city's growth and future.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 22, 2000
WASHINGTON - The Senate last night endorsed an aid package of nearly $1 billion to help Colombia equip and train security forces to combat drug traffickers in a country where the narcotics trade and guerrilla insurgency support each other. While the Senate delayed until today final passage of the legislation containing the aid, that outcome was not in doubt, and senators completed work on the Colombia portions of the bill. The Senate has now set aside a total of almost $1.3 billion for assistance to Colombia over the next two years, counting $300 million in an earlier military bill.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 6, 2000
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration's $1.3 billion plan to help Colombia fight drug trafficking and leftist insurgents is meeting with skepticism from U.S. military and law-enforcement officials concerned that the United States could be dragged into a long and costly struggle that may have little impact on the drug trade. The aid plan, which is to be presented in detail to Congress tomorrow, is intended to help stanch the booming production of cocaine and heroin in Colombia, strengthen the government and help it take control of a large part of its southern territory now dominated by the rebels.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 24, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush, under pressure to offer some gesture of help when he meets with Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev next week, may expand U.S. agricultural credits and technical assistance to the Soviet Union but won't announce a big aid package, officials said yesterday.The two presidents will meet in Madrid next week before jointly opening a Middle East peace conference. The Soviets cooperated in setting up the peace conference and in turn gained added stature in the Middle East by being part of it.The meeting, the two presidents' first since August's failed coup against Mr. Gorbachev, comes as the Soviets brace for winter food shortages amid the continuing collapse of their economy and the decline of the central government's authority.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 19, 2003
A $6.6 billion combined aid package for Micronesia and the Marshall Islands won't keep pace with inflation during the next 20 years and will ultimately produce a substantial cut in the per capita aid to the two impoverished nations, a U.S. General Acounting Office official testified yesterday. Susan S. Westin, the GAO's managing director of international affairs and trade, told the House subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific that an analysis of the proposed aid packages negotiated with the two countries as part of a revised Compact of Free Association shows that even with the creation of trust funds, the countries will face substantial cuts.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 27, 2003
SAFWAN, Iraq - The barefoot boy, maybe 5 years old, was named Jan if he understood the question put to him yesterday, the day this one small child on this one small patch of blood-dampened desert scrambled for some benefit from war, a tiny benefit, but something. Food arrived here yesterday in southernmost Iraq. Water did, too. To meet it came this little boy: dirty, thirsty, hungry, desperate, dressed in ragged clothing that just 54 miles to the south, in Kuwait City, would not be used to wipe down a car. And with the boy came many other boys and many men and a few women and the chaos to be expected when three 18-wheel tractor-trailers filled with supplies arrive at a town in which people have been scooping rain from dirt puddles to wash and to drink.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | March 23, 2003
TO HIGH SCHOOL seniors, getting accepted by a college is half the battle. The other half is now arriving in mailboxes. Colleges are sending out financial aid award letters that list the cost of a freshman year and how of much of it will be covered by grants, loans and work study or come out of the family's pocket. The information can be confusing. A recent Harvard University study of top high school seniors found that some had "self-defeating" responses to aid. For example, students were "excessively attracted" to loans and work-study, although those have less value than grants.
NEWS
By Sonni Efron and Sonni Efron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 22, 2003
ELMENDORF AIR FORCE BASE, Alaska - The United States will announce a resumption of food aid to North Korea soon, although concerns about making sure the supplies get to the needy have not yet been resolved, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell said yesterday. Powell's pledge came as he flew to Tokyo to begin a five-day Asian tour aimed at smoothing relations with U.S. allies and trying to find a diplomatic formula to bring North Korea to the negotiating table in the standoff over its nuclear programs.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 13, 2001
WASHINGTON - The Bush administration has rejected Pakistan's request to release a fleet of F-16 jet fighters that it bought in the 1980s, U.S. officials said yesterday, adding that the United States wanted to avoid destabilizing relations in South Asia. In an interview Saturday, the president of Pakistan, Gen. Pervez Musharraf, said transferring the fighters would be an important symbolic gesture of U.S. gratitude for his nation's strong support in the war in Afghanistan. Pakistan purchased 28 F-16s in the 1980s, but their delivery was blocked when Congress cut off all aid and military sales in 1990, citing Pakistan's secret development of nuclear weapons.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 22, 2000
WASHINGTON - The Senate last night endorsed an aid package of nearly $1 billion to help Colombia equip and train security forces to combat drug traffickers in a country where the narcotics trade and guerrilla insurgency support each other. While the Senate delayed until today final passage of the legislation containing the aid, that outcome was not in doubt, and senators completed work on the Colombia portions of the bill. The Senate has now set aside a total of almost $1.3 billion for assistance to Colombia over the next two years, counting $300 million in an earlier military bill.
BUSINESS
By GAIL MARKSJARVIS and GAIL MARKSJARVIS,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | April 23, 2006
Who would have thought that one piece of mail could stir so much emotion? But that's what happens to families this time of year when the initial elation over fat college acceptance envelopes morphs into sticker shock. In May, students generally need to let colleges know if they will attend next fall, or pass up offers to favorite institutions and settle for more affordable options. For many parents, that poses sleepless nights as they face $20,000 or $40,000 annual costs to make their children's dreams come true.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Gady A. Epstein and Thomas W. Waldron and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2000
Gov. Parris N. Glendening and legislative leaders are crafting an education aid package that would send an extra $22 million to local school systems next year, although key details over how to spend the money are unresolved. The proposal falls far short of what education advocates have called for to address a variety of needs, including a proposed $49 million intervention program to help students prepare for competency tests. It also seems certain that any final package will not include most of the nearly $50 million sought by Baltimore officials for the city's beleaguered school system.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Gady A. Epstein and Thomas W. Waldron and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2000
Gov. Parris N. Glendening and legislative leaders are crafting an education aid package that would send an extra $22 million to local school systems next year, although key details over how to spend the money are unresolved. The proposal falls far short of what education advocates have called for to address a variety of needs, including a proposed $49 million intervention program to help students prepare for competency tests. It also seems certain that any final package will not include most of the nearly $50 million sought by Baltimore officials for the city's beleaguered school system.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 6, 2000
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration's $1.3 billion plan to help Colombia fight drug trafficking and leftist insurgents is meeting with skepticism from U.S. military and law-enforcement officials concerned that the United States could be dragged into a long and costly struggle that may have little impact on the drug trade. The aid plan, which is to be presented in detail to Congress tomorrow, is intended to help stanch the booming production of cocaine and heroin in Colombia, strengthen the government and help it take control of a large part of its southern territory now dominated by the rebels.
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